To those running SAMBA servers:

Hey.
I've got a couple of questions for those of you running linux/SAMBA servers
for SW files:
-What filesystem(s) do you use for the samba partition (Some kind of
journaling FS, I assume)?
-Any special tweaks to the smb.conf file to increase speed? (ie: disable
support for 8.3 filenames for older win clients)
-Have you played with block sizes, i-node settings, etc?
-Anything else?
thanks,
nick e.
(server will be mandrake9.1 (or 9.2))
Reply to
Nick E.
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I pretty much run with defaults. EXT3 partitions.
I would like to figure out how to get pdmvault service to run on Wine. I started into it and ran out of time, but it should be doable.
Nick E. wrote:
Reply to
kellnerp
I run a EXT3 file system w/ no tweaks done to the smb.conf file. Basically just a "standard" config and it has worked well.
Reply to
sw2linux
ext3 runs nice.
samba is far faster than my 100mbit/s network cards.
defaults usually are fine.
none, but please don't use mandrake. for servers, you *SHOULD REALLY* move to slackware or debian.
cheers.
Reply to
Gianni Rondinini
Gianni Rondinini quipped:
what's that phrase dogbert uses?
oh yeah.
Bah!
:)
you know, i use it at home and know it, so it'll be ok.
besides for servers, you're supposed to use BSD. :-P
-nick e.
Reply to
Nick E.
i love dogbert... unfortunately it's not that common here in italy and i have to google the net to find something...
this would be the best solution, but while slackware may probably be installed by almost anybody, setting up a netbsd --don't tell me of freebsd, please :P-- server is a little bit trickier. and often in work environment you don't have the 20 minutes netbsd requires more than linux to be set up.
the other thing is that having a journaled file system in netbsd is not as straight forward as in linux and i'd highly recommend to use one on production servers.
bofh-regards ;)
Reply to
Gianni Rondinini

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