Any suggestions for HO gradient?

On 3/2/2009 3:22 PM Steve Caple spake thus:


Plus that mangling of "proprietary" he uses, "proprietry" (which is probably what it sounds like, but certainly not how it's spelled--oops, "spelt". Hey, I though that was some kind of German bread!)
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On Mon, 02 Mar 2009 15:37:05 -0800, David Nebenzahl wrote:

Spelt (Triticum spelta) is a relatively modern cross between the ancient emmer wheat, or farro (Triticum dicoccon) and wild goat grass (Aegilops tauschii).
True farro makes both the wonderful Tuscan bean and farro soup, but also is combined with chestnut (castagna) flour to make truly wonderful savory pastries.
Unscrupulous suppliers attempt to pass spelt off as farro; conversely, true farro (emmer) is often called spelt by the ignorant. True farro is primarily produced in the Garfagnana region of Tuscany (the Serchio river valley north of Lucca, between the Apuan Alps and the Appenines), and the producers would prefer to see use of the term farro controlled much as wines are under DOCG regulations. For the tase of real farro, look for the seal of the Consorzio Produttori Farro della Garfagnana IGP (indicazione geografica protetta).
http://www.amordivino.net/prodottitipici/prodotto.asp?ID 
Even the Italian Trade Commission badmouths the proud name of farro by referring to "Farro della Garfagnana (IGP)" as spelt:
http://www.italianmade.com/foods/subcat26003.cfm
Zuppa di Farro col Cavolo Nero:
http://italianfood.about.com/od/legumesandpasta/r/blr0004.htm
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Steve

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On 3/2/2009 5:47 PM Steve Caple spake thus:

So I guess there's no telling just *what* is in those "spelt" tortillas (yes, tortillas) you can get at Traitor Joes, eh?
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On Mon, 02 Mar 2009 18:09:16 -0800, David Nebenzahl wrote:

More than likely it's really spelt; the big surprise would be if it was farro, the "expensive spread".
http://www.purityfoods.com /
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Steve

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On Tue, 03 Mar 2009 12:37:05 +1300, David Nebenzahl

Alumin-um to you too.
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Gas: n. any aeriform or completely elastic fluid. Gasoline isn't that.
Calling a liquid fuel a "gas" is as stupid as calling food a "poison" because you eat a lot of fish. (see the French for fish)
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On Thu, 05 Mar 2009 09:49:44 +1300, Greg.Procter wrote:

Don't look a gift fish in the mouth, Fugu breath. Ess, mein kindt.
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Steve

PS - it's a nickname, or slang, stupid - even we seppos can see that
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wrote:

The instructions are written in German, so that won't help!
Greg.P. NZ
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On 23 Feb 2009 19:12:12 GMT, Wim van Bemmel wrote:

Oh - I see. here it's 1:87.1
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Steve

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I've always understood HO to be 3.5mm = 1 foot. An interesting cross between two measuring systems.That would be, pasted from Google, (1 foot) divided by (3.5 millimeters) = 87.0857143
J.B.
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Jim Bright wrote:

Those peculiar mixed-unit scale ratios were, to my knowledge, invented by Henry Greenly of UK in the 1910-1920 period.
Still in use are: 2mm/ft 3mm/ft 3.5mm/ft 4mm/ft 7mm/ft 10mm/ft ... and probably one or two larger ones that I don't remember the exact values for.
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Venlig hilsen/Best regards
Erik Olsen
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On Tue, 24 Feb 2009 15:59:18 +0100, Erik Olsen wrote:

Yes, they are still in use in UK. That is part of local folklore. Like saying a pint to one half liter of Guinness. Notice that 3.5 mm/ft is very rare there. 3 mm/ft and 4 mm/ft (OO) are exclusively used in UK. Of which 4mm/ft with at least 3 different rail gauges. 7 mm/ft known also as "O" too has several varieties.. And 2 mm/ft was also something ambiguous..
Nowhere in the world UK scales are taken seriously. You live in splendid isolation. Except the Protofour and Proto87 movements, they deserve respect from us all. Just the standard track width of 16.5 mm for HO 1:87 (correct) and UK 4mm/ ft (wrong) survived.
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Groet, salut, Wim.

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Wim van Bemmel wrote:

To my knowledge 3.5mm/ft still have followers in the UK.

I have the deepest respect for the Protofour/Scalefour people as well as for the other near-exact-scale people. They have managed to establish systems with enough followers to make commercial produktion of parts possible again boosting the number of followers. If you read from my home page you will know why.

That's an odd one. You may discuss if it's the gauge or the scale that is wrong, most often it is referred to as 4mm narrow gauge.
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Venlig hilsen/Best regards
Erik Olsen
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On Tue, 24 Feb 2009 17:54:53 +0100, Erik Olsen wrote:

Thanks for your link. I could not start the English version, so much of the text is unread by me, being not fluent in Danish.
Standard gauge, in metric 1435 mm, divided by 87 (H0) gives 16.494252874 which for all practical purposes is exactly 16.5 mm. So this is the correct gauge for standard gauge H0. FYI, I am modeling H0 to French prototype, now the Cevennes mining area, following NMRA standards, since 1975. NEM standards are converging to NMRA, but still are not the same.
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Groet, salut, Wim.

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Wim van Bemmel wrote:

Wim, which internet browser do you use? Normally clicking on Union Jack will bring you to the English index page but if it doesn't work in your browser, there may be a way to fix it.
The direct link to the English index page is http://www.modelbaneteknik.dk/index-e.htm
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Venlig hilsen/Best regards
Erik Olsen
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Erik Olsen skriver:

Virker ikke i Mozilla (det engelske link alts :-)
Klaus
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Modelbane Europas hjemmeside: http://www.modelbaneeuropa.hadsten.dk
Modeltog, internet, gratis spambekmpelse, elektronik og andet:
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Klaus D. Mikkelsen wrote:

Hm, I don't have Mozilla, but it doesn't work in Firefox either. Thanks for your reply, I will be checking into that.
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Venlig hilsen/Best regards
Erik Olsen
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Erik Olsen wrote:

The web pages have now been corrected such that the page title does not cover the flags (only in FF and Safari). I needed a bit of help from one of the web design groups as at first I couldn't figure it out.
Thanks again for your help, Wim and Klaus.
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Venlig hilsen/Best regards
Erik Olsen
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Wim van Bemmel wrote:

H0 scale 16.5 mm gauge 1:87 scale is the only gauge/scale where NEM and NMRA standards are close.
N scale 1:160 scale may seem similar but is not, the differences between NEM and NMRA standards are to large so mixing is to invite problems. I wrote of this in http://www.modelbaneteknik.dk/n-scale/stnd/stnd1-e.htm
NEM 0 scale 32mm gauge 1:45 scale is like H0 close to the correct gauge/scale ratio (1435mm/451.89mm) but does not exist in NMRA.
Scaleseven 33mm gauge 1:43.5 scale is to the correct gauge/scale ratio (1435/43.52.99mm) but is to my knowledge (like S2, S3 and S4) only used in the UK.
0 scale 32mm gauge 1:43.5 scale is used in France and some parts of Germany, among others. This is not a NEM standard.
NMRA 0 gauge 1.25in (31.75mm) gauge 1:48 scale has a wrong gauge/scale ratio and is completely different from the European 0 scales.
Btw for calculating gauge and similar one should take the tolerances into account. Gauge is never exact.
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Venlig hilsen/Best regards
Erik Olsen
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Jim Bright wrote:

The whole gauge/scale mess came about because commercial makers in the late 1800s/early 1900s didn't agree on scale ratios, and early authors who wrote handbooks for "model engineers", proposed scales that would be (relatively) easy to measure with ordinary rulers, at least to the limits of precision possible with hand tools. Henry Greenly was one such. Look him up. ;-)
HTH
wolf k.
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