Diesel locos designations

On 2/8/2008 8:28 AM Pac Man spake thus:
Just a tiny, tiny note that a viola is a musical instrument (the butt of many musical jokes). The word you're looking for is "voilá!".
Reply to
David Nebenzahl
Loading thread data ...
"Tobias Wittwer" wrote
Go back and read my original post. I was speaking only of the early SDs when I said "they *started out* as variants that were essentially the same locos, but the six axles gave them a lighter wheel loading".
I said what I meant, and I meant what I said; so if you wanna play nit-picking word games, go find someone else to bother.
Me, I'm anti-semantic.
Reply to
P. Roehling
Careless reading. There were two FL9s, the first batch at 1750hp, the second at 1800 hp. I read the two lines as "FL7" and FL9". My eyes must be egtting old. Erm, yeah, that's it. ;-)
Thanks for the added info.
-- wolf k.
Reply to
Wolf K.
Hey, you're right and I'm wrong - treasure the moment, but there's no call to build a shrine.
There's always the possibility!
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
I beg to differ - there's "design" horsepower, there's rail horsepower, there's SAE Horsepower, there's PSi Horsepower ... The V200 was intended to be a nominal 2,000 PSi machine. The engine came from an outside source, and could be had in different horsepower ratings for maximum power, longevity or anything in between. Initially, at the point of series production the 2,200 PSi motor was chosen and later with the V 200.1 series the 2,700 PSi motor was fitted.
The V 80 was the first of the series and the V 200 which followed was basically a doubled V 80 with two equivalent engine/gearbox/transmissions to the V 80's one.
The V160 was designed over a decade later and was a new design with a single engine/gearbox/transmission. There was the possibility allowed of fitting an auxilliary engine, mostly for electric train heating purposes as of course the entire series was hydraulic drive. Various versions (V 160-169) had a circa 500 PSi engine through to an over 1,000 PSi gas turbine due to the fact that the auxiliary engine could also be linked mechanically to the torque converter. The V100 was (if I remember correctly) a second generation single engine/gearbox/transmission locomotive without train heating.
The V 90 was a new design, based on the V100 but with greater weight and train heating. Of course they couldn't call it a V 100 as that designation was already used. I don't know why they didn't call it a V 110.
The DR used a different computer prefix; 0 - Steam. 1 - Diesel. 2 - Electric. That resulted in some renumbering when the DR and DB were reunited circa 1991.
01-10 Einheits (Standard design) Express Loks. 11-19 Absorbed Express Loks.
Some of the absorbed railways had 120 km/hr as "Express" speed while others had 110 Km/hr and even 100 Km/hr as express level. The KWStsE even had some 90 Km/hr Loks designated as Express Loks. (AD and ADh)
20-29 Einheits Passenger. 30-39 Absorbed Passenger. 40-49 Einheits Gueterzug-Loks. 50-59 Absorbed Goods. 60-68 Standard Passenger Tank locos. 69-79 Absorbed " " " 80-87 Einheits Goods Tanks 88-96 Absorbed " " 97 Rack Tanks. 98 Local service Tank locos. 99 Narrow Gauge.
Reply to
Greg Procter
Aren't you jumping to conclusions? Perhaps he was refering to a loco that played tiny, tiny notes and was the butt of many musical jokes - I'd like to hear them!
Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
Doncha hate it when that happens? :-p
Got that straight from an EMD employee who does slide shows in New England based on his collection of rare EMD items...including a shot of the original FL9 (water buffalo) plans. Most of them came from the dumpster when they closed LaGrange.
Paul A. Cutler III ************* Weather Or No Go New Haven *************
Reply to
Pac Man
And just like that, I'm an idiot. Voilá! LOL Thanks for the correction.
Paul A. Cutler III ************* Weather Or No Go New Haven *************
Reply to
Pac Man
Well, if it is the FL 9 from the New Haven RR, then it did have a musical sound that steam enthusiasts would love, because it had the Hancock air horn that sounded like a steam whistle.
Reply to
Frank A. Rosenbaum
On Sat, 09 Feb 2008 15:52:09 +1300, I said, "Pick a card, any card" and Greg Procter instead replied:
We know. -- Ray
Reply to
Ray Haddad
Since semantics has to do with the meaning of the words we write, we should all be pro-semantic. Otherwise there will be misunderstandings -- like the one in this thread.
Reply to
Mark Mathu
Am Sat, 09 Feb 2008 16:27:25 +1300 schrieb Greg Procter:
Ok, I didn't take that into account. Then, some of the designations make sense - V60, V80, V200, maybe also the V100, I'm still in doubt about the V160.
More like an improved V80 (more power), with a steam boiler.
The V90 was definitely not a new design. It is very similar to the V100, but a pure shunter/switcher, without train heating. I guess they chose the V90 name to bring it closer to the V60, the other switcher.
Toby
Reply to
Tobias Wittwer

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.