Diesel locos designations

wrote:


So what does MP mean (MP15DC)?
Would that be multi-purpose?
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Thus
cast
The "T" in "FT" stood for "Truss frame", IIRC (just like the Cast and Welded frames). The F in FT came from Fourteen Hundred Hp (they rounded up from 1350Hp).
Paul A. Cutler III ************* Weather Or No Go New Haven *************
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Am Wed, 06 Feb 2008 23:47:34 -0600 schrieb Karl P Anderson:

Wikipedia has a lot of information.
The EMD system has already been explained. The number behind the GP or SD designator is more or less a model number, although with engines built during the same period, it also says something about horsepower (-38: 2000 hp, -40: 3000 hp). Current production engines are the SD70-M2 and SD70 ACE.
The Alco Century series have designations like C424, where C stands for Century, 4 for four-axle, and 24 for 2400 horsepower. The GE U-boats were U25B, U30C etc., where U stands for Universal, the numbers for the horsepower rating, and the letter for two- or three-axle trucks. A similar system has been in use until today: B30-7 - Dash-7, four axle, 3000 hp Dash 8-40C (often called C40-8) - six axle, 4000 hp This system was also used for the Dash 9. The AC versions, although essentially the same loco, were called AC4400CW and AC6000CW (AC, horsepower rating, C trucks, wide cab). The system has been slightly changed for the engines now in production: ES40DC, ES44DC, ES44AC, where ES stands for Evolution Series, the numbers are of course the horsepower rating, and the letters say whether DC or AC traction motors are used.
Now, guessing the type from looking at an engine can be tricky, as there are often only tiny differences between models. All the Dash 9s and AC....CW look very similar (the Evolution series, also known as GEVOs, also don't differ much), as do engines with the same body, but different prime movers (GP38, GP40). The new SD70 ACEs and M-2s can be distinguished from older SD70s by the characteristic cut-outs in the short hood.
Toby
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Thanks for all the info. I should have known the answer wouldn't be simple. At first I thought the first letter(s) would refer to the manufacture, but then I thought many manufactures were making similar engines so there might be a rule they all followed. Duh!! Why would they work together?
I like Geezer's link to thedieselshop. That has alot of good info and pictures. Thanks Geezer for finding that.
Have fun everybody!
Karl
Karl P Anderson wrote:

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Karl P Anderson wrote:

You mat find the following Kalmbach diesel information books helpful. All are out of print, but they are very handy in the car. I used the first one so much it started to fall apart, so I had it rebound. Very handy for identifying locos in older pictures. For Canada, the Bytown Railway Society's yearly "Trackside Guides" are essential.
Pinkepank, Jerry A. Diesel Spotter's Guide (1967) Marre, Louis A., and Pinkepank, Jerry A. The Contemporary Diesel Spotter's Guide (1969) Pinkepank, Jerry A. The Second Diesel Spotter's Guide (1973) Pinkepank, Jerry A and Marre, Louis A. Diesel Spotter's Guide Update (1979, ISBN 0024-029-0) MacDonald, Charles W. Diesel Locomotive Rosters: United States, Canada, Mexico (1982, ISBN 0-89-24-043-4)
HTH
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On Wed, 06 Feb 2008 23:47:34 -0600, Karl P Anderson

EMD Locos:
GP = General Purpose and will always be a 4 axle SD = Special Duty and will always be a 6 axle F = 4 axle E = 6 axle
Not sure if E and F have any particular "name" like GP/SD
Look at the number of axles to tell which one it is...beyond that you'll need a copy of the diesel spotters guide to find out whether it's a GP30 a GP38-2 a GP40 or a GP60, or so forth.
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Not necessarily. EMD FL9's had 5 axles.
Paul A. Cutler III ************* Weather Or No Go New Haven *************
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wrote:

that would be FL rather than F then wouldn't it?
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No, the "L" is for "Lengthed". It's still an F unit.
Len
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wrote:

"Lengthened" to accommodate that extra axle...therefore not a regular F unit.
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Then what about FP's?
Paul A. Cutler III ************* Weather Or No Go New Haven *************
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Pac Man wrote:

Short for GP?
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Am Fri, 08 Feb 2008 22:37:03 -0500 schrieb Pac Man:

Fs for passenger service (steam boiler, water tank).
Toby
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On 2/6/2008 9:47 PM Karl P Anderson spake thus:

While we're on the subject, since we've got folks here from all over the world, what about, say, Yurpeen locomotives: were there designations for them that followed some logical scheme according to type? What about Asian ones?
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

Yurp is a whole lot of countries and a whole lot of manufacturers. German railways used V for Diesel and a number indicating 10s of horsepower. (eg V 200 Diesel hydraulic - 2000 bhp)
New Zealand used D (Diesel and a suffix a, b, c, d, ... except the the first one was De, then Df, Dg, Da, ...
Shunting tractors are Tr.
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Am Fri, 08 Feb 2008 20:03:16 +1300 schrieb Greg Procter:

No, the number was not related to the horsepower. The V200 had 2,200 hp, the V200.1 2,700. IIRC, the V200 was as "double V100", as it had two of the engines used in the V100. For the same reason, the V160 was called just that, as "double V80", though later on it was decided to use one more powerful engine instead of two. Finally, the V90 has the same engine as the V100, was developed later, and was heavier, so the numbers really say nothing about either horsepower or age. But yes, until 1968, V was used for diesels (Verbrennungsmotor) and E for electrics. After 1968, steam was in the 0 range, electrics in the 1 range, and diesels 2 (the V200 became the 220 and 221, V100 the 211 and 212, V90 the 290 etc.). 3 are small locos, 4 electric MU trains, 6 diesel MU trains, 7 service equipment. With steam locos, there was a further subdivision since the 1920s. 01 to 19 were express engines (I think speed of 100 kph or faster), from 20 passenger, from 40 freight etc. (I don't remember all the details). There where of course many different models as all the state railroads were combined into one, so e.g. all Pacifics ended up with an 18 number, while all 0-6-0 (C) tender engines where 89s.
Toby
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Tobias Wittwer wrote:

I beg to differ - there's "design" horsepower, there's rail horsepower, there's SAE Horsepower, there's PSi Horsepower ... The V200 was intended to be a nominal 2,000 PSi machine. The engine came from an outside source, and could be had in different horsepower ratings for maximum power, longevity or anything in between. Initially, at the point of series production the 2,200 PSi motor was chosen and later with the V 200.1 series the 2,700 PSi motor was fitted.
The V 80 was the first of the series and the V 200 which followed was basically a doubled V 80 with two equivalent engine/gearbox/transmissions to the V 80's one.

The V160 was designed over a decade later and was a new design with a single engine/gearbox/transmission. There was the possibility allowed of fitting an auxilliary engine, mostly for electric train heating purposes as of course the entire series was hydraulic drive. Various versions (V 160-169) had a circa 500 PSi engine through to an over 1,000 PSi gas turbine due to the fact that the auxiliary engine could also be linked mechanically to the torque converter. The V100 was (if I remember correctly) a second generation single engine/gearbox/transmission locomotive without train heating.

The V 90 was a new design, based on the V100 but with greater weight and train heating. Of course they couldn't call it a V 100 as that designation was already used. I don't know why they didn't call it a V 110.

The DR used a different computer prefix; 0 - Steam. 1 - Diesel. 2 - Electric. That resulted in some renumbering when the DR and DB were reunited circa 1991.
01-10 Einheits (Standard design) Express Loks. 11-19 Absorbed Express Loks.

Some of the absorbed railways had 120 km/hr as "Express" speed while others had 110 Km/hr and even 100 Km/hr as express level. The KWStsE even had some 90 Km/hr Loks designated as Express Loks. (AD and ADh)

20-29 Einheits Passenger. 30-39 Absorbed Passenger. 40-49 Einheits Gueterzug-Loks. 50-59 Absorbed Goods. 60-68 Standard Passenger Tank locos. 69-79 Absorbed " " " 80-87 Einheits Goods Tanks 88-96 Absorbed " " 97 Rack Tanks. 98 Local service Tank locos. 99 Narrow Gauge.

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Am Sat, 09 Feb 2008 16:27:25 +1300 schrieb Greg Procter:

Ok, I didn't take that into account. Then, some of the designations make sense - V60, V80, V200, maybe also the V100, I'm still in doubt about the V160.

More like an improved V80 (more power), with a steam boiler.

The V90 was definitely not a new design. It is very similar to the V100, but a pure shunter/switcher, without train heating. I guess they chose the V90 name to bring it closer to the V60, the other switcher.
Toby
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On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 09:51:09 +0100, Tobias Wittwer wrote:

Tim Allen says that for MORE POWER you can't beat 220V
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Steve Caple wrote:

415 V AC is better!
Greg.P.
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