Lighting

Dana Miller wrote:


60 mph into unknown territory and then have a train fall on you???? The human body generally isn't up to that!

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Greg Procter wrote:
>>> The light can be on in the cab, but there is a door between there >>> and the machine room/engine room. That room, with the portholes, >>> would have lights with an on/off switch. The driver should have >>> no reason to be in the machine room while in motion unless he is >>> confronted with an inevitable head-on collision. >>> >> I've always wondered what SOP was in this case. I thought They'd >> exit stage right or left. > > 60 mph into unknown territory and then have a train fall on you???? > The human body generally isn't up to that!
Some blokes get lucky. There was a major collision here in 1997 when a coal train ran up the clacker of the one in front at speed. One of the enginemen stepped off at about 62kph. He spent many months in hospital. His mate stayed on the loco, and also survived his injuries. The luckiest person involved was a passenger on the adjacent station platform - he out-ran a 100 ton hopper that was chasing him...
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mark_newton wrote:

Racing motocyclists regularly fall off at speeds up to 200km/hr. The trick is to not hit anything other than the ground until your speed diminishes to about walking speed. Also loco platforms/walkways tend to be higher than motorcycle seats and tracksides tend to have more solid accessories than race tracks!
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Greg Procter wrote:
>>> 60 mph into unknown territory and then have a train fall on >>> you???? The human body generally isn't up to that! >> >> Some blokes get lucky. There was a major collision here in 1997 >> when a coal train ran up the clacker of the one in front at speed. >> One of the enginemen stepped off at about 62kph. He spent many >> months in hospital. His mate stayed on the loco, and also survived >> his injuries. The luckiest person involved was a passenger on the >> adjacent station platform - he out-ran a 100 ton hopper that was >> chasing him...
> Racing motocyclists regularly fall off at speeds up to 200km/hr. The > trick is to not hit anything other than the ground until your speed > diminishes to about walking speed.
I would have thought the trick was to not fall off in the first place!
> Also loco platforms/walkways tend to be higher than motorcycle seats > and tracksides tend to have more solid accessories than race tracks!
Granted. I would not recommend stepping off a loco at any speed greater than walking pace, but if it's the least worst option available to you, you *might* be lucky.
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On Thu, 01 Sep 2005 08:21:20 +1000, mark_newton

I reckon I'd have some JATO-like assist from solids leaving my body at the rear as I ran from the thing...
CL
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Cheery Littlebottom wrote:
>> Some blokes get lucky. There was a major collision here in 1997 >> when a coal train ran up the clacker of the one in front at speed. >> One of the enginemen stepped off at about 62kph. He spent many >> months in hospital. His mate stayed on the loco, and also survived >> his injuries. The luckiest person involved was a passenger on the >> adjacent station platform - he out-ran a 100 ton hopper that was >> chasing him... > > I reckon I'd have some JATO-like assist from solids leaving my body > at the rear as I ran from the thing...
LOL! You and me both!
I've got some photos of the scene, which I'll find and post a link to. When you see the damage, you'll be amazed that no-one was killed...
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Mark Mathu wrote:
> Were portholes on first-generation diesels mainly an ornamental > feature?
Given that the fireman would be expected to go back and inspect the machinery while running, I'd say no.
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But since operation could very likely be during night time - lights would be required anyway. [But I'm just wondering and speculating with my question here.]
Certainly EMD (or others) didn't plan on using the portholes for maintenance lighting?
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Mark Mathu wrote:
> But since operation could very likely be during night time - lights > would be required anyway.
Absolutely. I reckon the portholes were provided to make the interior a little less claustrophobic by day or night. Our 44 class Alco cab-units were rather uncomfortable by comparison, having no portholes or any other windows.
> Certainly EMD (or others) didn't plan on using the portholes for > maintenance lighting?
I wouldn't think so.
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Well, yes, they were, but, ornamental or not, if the engine room lights were turned on at night, the light would show. Being unnecessary doesn't make them non-functional as windows. During daylight hours enough light would usually come into the area to remove the need to use the lights. Most of us tried to avoid being in the engine room anyway, unless it was absolutely necessary. Hot, noisy, smelly, nasty.
Froggy,
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Mark Mathu wrote:

No, they allowed light inside the otherwise dark carbody. FT's had four on each side. F2's and phase-1 F3's had three on each side, later models had only two on the "A" units, but still had three on the "B" units.
In many cases the portholes could be opened for added ventilation. On the FT units, some had a seventh porthole (4+5) for the hostler to stick his head out while moving the loco (most FB units had minimal operating controls).
This also addresses one of my pet gripes. Lots of people like the newer "F" unit models because of their 'see through' side screens. While these DO allow one to see the carbody structure and sometimes the radiator sections, one should NOT be able to see clear through the units from side-to-side as most of the models allow. These screened openings all had sheet metal ductwork behind them that normally completely closed them off from the carbody interior. You could NOT usually see through the units, nor see out of them from inside. This left the interior almost totally dark, except for the portholes. I've been in a lot of "F" units and can attest to this. I'm not so familiar with the "E" units (only been in a few, long ago), but as I recall, and I otherwise surmise, they were much the same.
There were electric lights inside the carbody. If these were on at night, you could see light out the portholes. It was NOT a bright light, however, and pretty dim really.
Dan Mitchell ===========
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I paint the surfaces visible through the portholes on my Fs black. This looks much better than the metallic sheen from the ballast slug.
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For DC power, this (whatever it is/was) must have used a battery to power the lights, since you have to cut power to the tracks to stop the train.
Of course, with DCC power, what you describe is SOP.
-- Bill McC.
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| > Some time ago, probably in Model RR magazine they talked about "Constant | > Lighting" for locomotives or even passenger cars. | > lights are one even when not moving or parked.
| For DC power, this (whatever it is/was) must have used a battery to power | the lights, since you have to cut power to the tracks to stop the train.
Back in the olden days there were circuits typically called "Hi Fi" lighting. A high frequency AC feed to the rails powered lights. The motors were filtered to not see that AC feed. The Hi Fi was constant so lights were always on.
It would also drive furry animals out of the house if it wasn't tuned correctly.
| Of course, with DCC power, what you describe is SOP.
Much has changed.
CTucker NY
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It's always good to learn something new or, in this case, old. Thanks! -- Bill McC.
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You can build a signal generator that can be used to superimpose a 15KHz low-voltage AC to the rails. Some auxiliary capacitors will keep the DC off the lights, and the motors cannot see the AC because the frequency is too high. Some people can hear 15Khz and dogs and cats will go nutz if the amplitude is too high. They can hear it just fine.
In the "old days", back in the '50s & '60s, articles on building these sorts of things were quite common. Transistor throttles and the famous Twin T signal system were of this era as well. The advent of DCC has so reduced the audience receptive to this sort of thing that you almost never see them any more.
Froggy,
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On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 04:08:56 GMT, Froggy wrote:

Especially those of us who were sonar operators.
--
Steve

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