Ripples in water surface.

I could use some help and I'll be glad to reciprocate with stuff I know about.
I can not figure out how to get decent ripples in water. I have not yet
tried Woodland Scenics "water", and I have heard that it sort of works. All of my rivers are Enviro Tex Lite over stones and sand and the surface is "millpond" or smooth. The effect is rather nice as I add Pullman Green and Roof Brown and the bottom is still visable, but not quite realistic. I have tried stiring when Enviro Tex is almost in the dry stage and I have tried heat guns.....nada!
My dad in the 50's used linolium cement applied with a trowel and with this tool he would he would carve perfect ripples or river water patterns as the cement was setting.. Then all was painted mud brown and gloss added later. It looked great, but I think we can do much better today. I'd sure be grateful for some tips or ideas.
Many thanks, Howard Zane
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Howard Zane wrote:

TRy the water effects by woodlandscenic
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Woodland Scenics "Water Effects" (aka artist's gloss gel medium) is great for this. I use a wide fan brush, and "push" the medium in lines across the water. You can add successive layers to make more ripples, and make them cross directions or build up in Vs around stones or wakes around boats. You can see some of my efforts in the Photo album on the Bend Track SIG page here:
http://daytonn-track.org /
See the waterfall and river pictures.
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Joe Ellis wrote:

And the artist's variety is usually cheaper :-).
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It's turtles, all the way down

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On Fri, 03 Nov 2006 08:50:48 -0800, Larry Blanchard wrote:

No it's not, the turtle's only one of the top layers, at least according to Hazmat Modine in their album's title song "Bahamut":
http://www.hazmatmodine.com/sound.html
(click on "Bahamut" under SAMPLE TUNES FROM BAHAMUT, and be sure to listen through to the cosmological digression)
http://www.popmatters.com/pm/music/reviews/5163/hazmat-modine-bahamut /
?No one has ever seen Bahamut?, we learn, thanks to its massive size. All of us are floating inside a bowl, on a tortuga, on a mountain, in an acacia tree, which grows from ?the snout of a giant blood-red ox with fifty eyes?, which fits inside one of the Bahamut?s tears. ?Some think it?s a fish? some think it?s a newt...?
<G>
--
Steve

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Steve Caple wrote:

Sounds to me like they swiped and modified an idea from Terry Pratchett and his "Discworld" series.
He's the only author that can make me laugh out loud while reading :-).
--
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On Sat, 04 Nov 2006 08:55:32 -0800, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

Ever read any Spider Robinson? -- Ray
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Ray Haddad wrote:

Yes, and I like his stuff, but I find my sense of humor more like Pratchetts.
--
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On Sat, 04 Nov 2006 08:55:32 -0800, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Yep, it makes about as much sense as most cosmologies. Did you listen to it?
--
Steve

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Steve Caple wrote:

Nope. I don't listen to groups with weird names. Mostly I listen, if at all, to classical or folk. Although I do admit to fond memories of Bill Haley and the Comets.
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On Sun, 05 Nov 2006 09:08:50 -0800, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Weird names? Like The Doors, or Jefferson Airplane or The Beatles? Or Warren Zeavon? What a strange and limiting thing to proclaim.
I listen mostly to folk (of many sub-genres), with classical (from Josquin to Bartok) and blues and a little rock and less country. Hazmat Modine is a great folk/blues band, but if you find the canned predictability and rigid metre of Bill Haley entertaining (my folks loved it, but I found it to be really mickey music back in the late '50s/early '60s) then Hazmat Modine may be too much for you.
I'm not much on odd names either, but even The Strawberry Alarm Clock managed at least one decent track. Names, in a music industry dominated by schlockhead A&R types, publicists and agents, are a pretty poor guide to the actual stuff. Besides, look where a prosaic name like Bush has got us.
--
Steve

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Steve Caple wrote:

It was a joke, Steve. Meant to express my dislike for almost all "popular music" since the early 60s.
And I earned the right to be an old fart - I'm 69 :-).
-- It's turtles, all the way down
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On Mon, 06 Nov 2006 09:13:34 -0800, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Well, you've got 6 years on me, but I'm definitely an 'alte furze' in many ways, not to mention the most literal sense. I guess we can agree that Britney (g-d dammit, spelling counts!!!) and Kenny Gee and Janni suck.
--
Steve

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On Mon, 6 Nov 2006 12:32:33 -0800, Steve Caple wrote:

Kenny G walks onto an elevator and says: "Man, this place is swingin'!"
Tejas Pedro
"What, me worry? I voted for Kinky!'
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On Tue, 07 Nov 2006 12:53:37 -0600, Random Excess wrote:

Have you heard the song by Richard Thompson, one of my candidates for guitar god, that starts (on a variant of the tune of Humoresque)
"I agree with Pat Metheny Kenny's talent is too teeny . . ." ?
A great rant.
--
Steve

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On Tue, 7 Nov 2006 11:32:56 -0800, Steve Caple wrote:

I've not heard that particular RT piece but he's so much more than just a candidate for "Guitar God." He may well be one!
Metheny's rant is classic BTW, and available over the net last time I looked. Legitimate too, I might add, although, oddly, I can tolerate kg's unmistakably feeble attempts at music on the rare occassions that I'm riding in an elevator. Go figure.
Tejas Pedro
"What, me worry? I voted for Kinky!"
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On Sun, 5 Nov 2006 11:03:35 -0800, Steve Caple wrote:

Danny Cedrone and Franny Beecher both were killer guitar players, all it takes is ears to know it. In the referenced time frame it was probably one of those guy's playing that you heard. And Skinny Minnie is a great song with a fabulous horn chart.

You know what's really limiting? Insisting on listening only to esoteria. I think that lotta folks do that just to try and show off how intelligent they think they are. Besides, The Doors absolutely sucked.
Try some Louis Armstrong Hot Five and/or Hot Seven, some Benny Goodman quintet with Charlie Christian, some Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Chuck Berry (it's really about the lyrics with Chuck), or how 'bout Huey "Piano" Smith and The Clowns, Kinky Friedman and The Texas Jewboys or even Mojo Nixon, not to mention the likes of TheThree Kings - Freddie, BB, and Albert.

Bartok and Stravinsky are way too sramt for the likes of me and I'm so dumb I never even heard of Josquin. I'll see them and raise you Schubert and Mozart, a couple of cats who really had a way with the kinds of melodies that could bring tears of joy or sadness to your eyes, instead of making your brain go up in smoke.

Unless the names are Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard (again, it's the words as much as the music), Tom Waits, John Pryne, or a personal favorite with me, Bob Dylan (lyrics again).

Rove is the name, amorality the game. Without Rove Butch would be anonymously running yet another business into the ground.
Tejas Pedro
"What, me worry? I'm voting for Kinky!"
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On Mon, 06 Nov 2006 12:12:30 -0600, Random Excess wrote:

Hazmat Modine sure ain't esoterica. We listen to what is fun for us, what blows us away, and avoid what bores us.

Have to disagree there.

Sounds good. Add Bessie Smith and Billy Holiday. Keep the Miles to the earlier stuff for me, thanks. And I've been a Kinky fan for years (but not his attempts at mystery writing), ever since I heard that rumor about a tumor.

I heard Josquin de Pres' music thanks to my sister in law. I like a lot of early stuff like that. Stravinsky's Rite of Spring is loads of fun, but much of his other stuff falls off for me - Petrouchka is a little too precious. I like the more accessible Bartok, like Concerto for Orchestra, or Music for Percussion, Stings and Celeste. I like Prokofiev (my wife has seen the Stuttgart Ballet do Romeo and Juliet four or five times, but then she used to live there) and noisy Shostakovitch (which she doesn't like). Mozart can be good or can be boring, but I blame the times (and the self-titled "noble" A&R types) for most of the boring parts. A little Schubert goes a long way for me (as does a little Johnny Cash). I like hokey old Brahms though.

Real names are just fine with me. We saw John Prine here just the other week.

Amen to that!!
--
Steve

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Steve Caple spake thus:

Yep, just as limiting as only listening to rap, or ranchero, or ... whatever. The musical mono-diet.

Me too. One of the few truly transcendental musical experiences of my youth was the first time I heard "Light My Fire", fooling around with my parents' Magnavox stereo, from some faint, crackling out-of-town AM station somewhere west of Chicago. I could not believe what I was hearing. The only comparable jolt musically speaking was the first hearing of "Purple Haze".

"Hokey old Brahms"? Excuse me, please: what could be more sublime than his symphonies, especially the 1st, written in the dark shadow of the giant, Beethoven; or his Academic Festival Overture (complete with student drinking songs); not to mention his chamber music.
It's too bad that both Stravinsky and, especially, Bartk, have such bad raps and are typecast as difficult, cerebral, atonal. Certainly some of their music is, but much of it isn't and only requires a few times to acclimate oneself to. Of course, the Concerto for Orchestra is about the most accessible Bartk, including the part most people will recognize from "The Shining", but his ballet music (I'm thinking of the suites from the Wooden Prince and The Miraculous Mandarin) are equally charming and full of aural treats.
The other end of another spectrum for Bartk is his folk-music inspired stuff, which, if anything, may be too simple for most folks' tastes these days, but which I find irresistible: try the Romanian Dances (arranged for string orchestra, several recordings available) if you want to check it out.

Memories, they can't be boughten, They can't be won at carnivals for free. It took me years to get those souvenirs, And I don't know how they slipped away from me.

Could do worse than him. Anyone capable of writing "They Don't Make Jews Like Jesus Anymore" can't be all bad.
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On Mon, 06 Nov 2006 15:19:01 -0800, David Nebenzahl

Let me rephrase: The musicians in The Doors were pretty good. It was the front man for whom I didn't care. Had a chance to go hear them at The Scene, I think it was, when they were "up and coming." I told my friends I wasn't too enthused about seeing an ego-tripper dressed in tight leather. Went to The Night Owl instead that evening for The Magicians and The Blues Magoos.

My biggest rock jolt was The Kinks "You Really Got Me." To me, *the* prototypical punk rock song. There'd never been anything like it up to then. Hendrix wasn't so much a jolt as he was a jaw-dropper for me.
Biggest jazz ear-opener was at Carnegie Recital Hall to hear Pizzarelli and Barnes, Bucky and George. I'd no idea that two guitars could do anything like what those guys did, and they made it look so easy!
Thanks for the heads ups on some accessible Bartok. Might be time to revisit, it's been many years.
Tejas Pedro
"What, me worry? I voted for Kinky!"
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