Slightly OT: Most important train locomotives

WisdomSeeker wrote:

Well, that will work fine for North American diesels, less so for steam or electric locos from there, or from anywhere else. NA diesels, *generally speaking*, tend to be mass-produced designs ordered from a catalogue, whereas steam and electric locos, *generally speaking*, tended to be custom-designed and built for each customer. Before all the pedants leap on that, I know very well that most steam builders offered catalogue designs, but with the possible exception of Baldwin - maybe, they were not the majority of their output.
Cheers,
Mark.
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Mark Newton wrote:

Prussian designs of steam locos often ran into thousands produced, and often replicas were sold across Europe and the ME. (in addition to being taken as reparations after two world wars. Ditto the German Kreigsloks of WWII. Russian steam locomotives also were built in huge numbers, over 10,000 for at least one type.
Regards, Greg.P.
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On 20 May 2007 17:51:18 -0700, WisdomSeeker

Well, I'll take a stab at it. Very North American-centric...
#1 would have to be one of the earliest functioning steam locos. They are specifically named (i.e. "Stephenson's Rocket", "The Dewitt Clinton", "John Bull") because they were generally one-off prototypes.
#2 The "American" type 4-4-0. From the early 1850's to nearly the turn of the next century they were the dominant type.
#3 The "Atlantic" type 4-4-2. Ushered in very high speed passenger service.
#4 The electrified commuter train. Made mass transit in big cities like NYC and Chicago practical. I'd include in this the interurbans.
#5 The heavy electric locomotive. Perhaps in particular the 1915 GE boxcabs of the Chicago Milwaukee and St. Paul. They had influence worldwide. Also my favorite loco :) Stick a diesel engine onboard and you can lose the wires- hence the modern diesel- electric was born.
I'll stop there. Is this more the format your seeking?
Dale
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Unfortunately, some of the most significant locomotives appeared as only one instance. For example, the Stephenson "Rocket" was significant because it developed the basic successful formula for all steam locomotives for the next 150 years, but only one example named "Rocket" was built.
--
-Glennl
The despammed service works OK, but unfortunately
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Steam, Diesel, and Electric. Worldwide.

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WisdomSeeker wrote:

Only 10? I think you've got buckley's of narrowing it down to 10 locos.
Mark.
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Mark Newton spake thus:

"Buckleys"? Now *that's* a term I've never hoid before. Translation, pleeze.
--
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On Mon, 21 May 2007 11:17:11 -0700, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

It's an Oz saying. Idiomatic. http://www.anu.edu.au/andc/ozwords/Oct%202000/Buckley 's.html -- Ray
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Ray Haddad spake thus:

OK, equivalent to AmE. "bupkis".
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

Now *that's* a term I've never hoid before.
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Greg Procter spake thus:

American English, from Yiddish "bubkes". Actually commonly misused, as it originally meant "nonsense" but is mostly used to mean "nothing", as in "I went to visit that guy Greg who said he was giving away a bunch of model RR stuff, but I came away with nothing, nada, zip, zilch, bupkis".
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Ray Haddad spake thus:

OMG; that led me to another Oz-ism, "furphy". How many terms like this, named after mythical persons, do y'all have down there?
"Furphy" reminds me of the carryings-on of that venerable American "organization", E Clampus Vitus, aka "the Clampers": http://www.eclampusvitus.net .
--
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On Mon, 21 May 2007 17:22:18 -0700, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

Those little nuggets turn up frequently here.

Yes, indeed. There's a lot of that going around here. What we need is a monument to trolls who by dint create the furphies here. -- Ray
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David Nebenzahl wrote:
> Mark Newton spake thus: > >> WisdomSeeker wrote: >> >>> Steam, Diesel, and Electric. >>> Worldwide. >> >> Only 10? I think you've got buckley's of narrowing it down to 10 locos. > > "Buckleys"? Now *that's* a term I've never hoid before. Translation, pleeze.
You've got two chances, Buckley's, and none. Believed to be derived from the famous Melbourne emporium Buckley & Nunn's. But don't take my word for it, at least not without a large grain of salt.
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Mark Newton spake thus:

Ah, yes, In Texas I'm told they say, "Well, your chances are slim to none, and Slim just left town ...".
--
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On Mon, 21 May 2007 19:01:11 -0700, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

. . . with a nun named Sister Mary Elephant. -- Ray
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On Tue, 22 May 2007 14:27:21 +0800, Ray Haddad wrote:

Dave's not here, man.
--
Steve

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WisdomSeeker wrote:

1. The Beaver & Meadows RR Hercules. The first true American type (4-4-0) to incorporate "equalized" (independantly sprung) drivers which made a four wheel drive truly practical. The equalization allowed each driver to rise and fall on the springs to follow uneven track. Equalization increased traction, and reduced the chance of derailment by allowing each driver to keep its tire snug onto the rail and its flange set fully inside the railhead. Earlier rigid suspensions would allow one driver to lift off the rail, which made it easier for the wheel flange to climb up onto the top of the rail and then down on the wrong side, putting the locomotive on the ground. Hercules was built by Philadephia's Garrett & Eastwick company in 1836. The equalized drivers were introduced on a rebuild a year or so later. The resulting design was so satisfactory that more than 25000 American 4-4-0's were built by 1900. IThe American type outnumbered all other steam types by 3 to 1 in the 19th century.
2. The Electromotive Corp light weight streamliners, the Burlington Zephyr and the Flying Yankee. These were light weight stream lined trains with the "power car" integrated into a single train. They were a forerunner of the vast fleets of Electro Motive Division (EMD) diesels that dominated US railroading for 40 years. The power cars carried a 600 hp Winton "distillate" internal combustion engine turning a DC generator to power electric traction motors, the basic arrangement used in diesel electric locomotives.
3. The EMD "F-unit". The diesel freight locomotive that caused the US fleet of steam locomotives to be scrapped by the end of the 1950's. The "F-unit" was handsomely styled and had multiple unit control, by which a single engineer could operate any number of "F-units" ganged up on the head end of a train. This locomotive gave the US diesel locomotive market to EMD. Existing locomotive builders, Alco, Baldwin, Lima and Fairbanks Morse were largely driven out of the business. The first F-3 models went on sale just before WWII. During the war, the war production board restricted the manufacture of diesel locomotives so that the scarce and high tech diesel engines could be diverted to war work such as submarines, naval vessels, and Army power plants. The few F-3 units in commission worked hard thru out the war and gave EMD invaluable operating experience, and allowed the bugs to be worked out. After the war EMD could offer a proven and highly reliable design, whereas the competition's locomotives all suffered from various teething troubles characteristic of new designs. By the time the competitors had their products debugged, EMD owned the US diesel market. Ownership was retained until GE finally became competitive sometime in the 1980's. Moral of the story; it pays to be the first into the market.
4. The Pennsylvania RR GG-1 electric locomotive. A beautiful Raymond Lowry styled design of which 130 odd were built in the PRR shops in the 1930's. They were so well built they remained in revenue service well into the 1980's. They had power to spare, the suspension kept them on the rails at speeds up the 100 mph. A signature locomotive on the electrified PRR trackage.
5. The EMD GP-7. Prototypical road switcher, a type that became so popular that in time it completely replaced the "covered wagon" F units. The original GP 7 has decendents still in production. The road switcher abandoned the stylish streamlined look of the F units for a cab with vision fore and aft, allowing it's use as a switcher, and allowing it operate in either direction.
David Starr
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WisdomSeeker wrote:

I see you asked the same question in the 'jtrains' yahoogroup, using the name "uberboardgamer". What exactly is it you're trying to achieve? As it stands your question if far too general and non-specific.
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First, a huge thank you to all that have provided input. Good stuff. Thanks. Now as several people have mentioned, my specifications (10 most historically important make/model locomotives) were too vague. Sorry. And while 10 slots are clearly not enough to cover all the historically important locomotives, that is all that I have room for. So, maybe I am asking the wrong question. And I did not focus enough attention on the presentation aspect of the data. With all that in mind, I need to change the requirements just a little bit and ask you to review your input and send an update. Since this will need to end up as a graphical representation... What are 5 cool looking types/models/makes of STEAM locomotives that have some level of historical significance/importance/renown/ famousness (and please explain the significance if you can) [Please only recommend locomotives for which pictures (or at least drawings) are available]? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. [I realize that again "cool" is a bit vague. I apologize in advance. I guess that by "cool" I mean visually interesting/unique/impressive but feel free to use your best judgement to recommend trains that you think are cool looking and that have some historical significance.]
What are 3 cool looking types/models/makes of DIESEL locomotives that have some level of historical significance/importance/renown/ famousness (and please explain the significance if you can) [Please only recommend locomotives for which pictures (or at least drawings) are available]? 1. 2. 3.
What are 3 cool looking types/models/makes of electric/hydraulic/ magnetic locomotives that have some level of historical significance/ importance/renown/famousness (and please explain the significance if you can) [Please only recommend locomotives for which pictures (or at least drawings) are available]? 1. 2. 3.
Not necessarily looking for specific named instances of a locomotive, but rather the types/models/makes (although you may feel free to add a locomotive to the list because it looks cool and there is a famous instance of it or there was only one ever made [probably most appropriate for the steam locomotives]).
Thank you again for your assistance.

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