Walthers Code 83 switches

I have several older Walthers Code 83 switches (Walthers Part # 948-804) that apparently do not have isolated frogs. They have since
been replaced by (Walthers Part # 948-8804) DCC friendly switches.
I have no idea how this affects my plans to use my older switches in a DCC layout.
Could someone please help me to understand if I can still use these older switches. And, if so, what must I do to make them work?
Many Thanks! Matt
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On 17/12/2011 1:53 PM, mc snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Yes, but you must isolate the frogs by using plastic railjoiners (or gaps in the rails) when connecting the frog end of the turnouts to the tracks beyond them. This needs to be done only when turnouts face each other they do on a passing siding, for example. Otherwise you'll get short circuits, because when the turnout is thrown, ground and hot sides will be connected.
Turnouts with isolated frogs merely incorporate the isolation in the turnout itself (various ways of ding this).
If this isn't clear enough, I suggest you buy one of the books on wiring a layout. Money (and time) well invested IMO.
HTH Wolf K.
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Thanks so much!
I now understand. I will use insulated connectors to avoid any problems.
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Hi Wolf,
Might you have a suggestion for a DCC / LED wiring book?
I would like to use LED lighting along the rails and throughout my first module in buildings, etc. I'm fine using the equations to do the calculations for resistors, but I remain totally confused about the input values that I need to use in those equations. A book on wiring basics for DCC and LED/resistors is a must item going forward for me - preferably one with some color images, etc. of the examples being discussed and explained.
Qeustion 1: Do you recommend using a secondary power supply for LED lighting and leave the rail power to its own power supply???
Thanks Many Times Over!!! Matt
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On 03/01/2012 3:32 PM, mc snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Try: http://carstensbookstore.com/prgutodicoco.html
or:
http://www.kalmbachstore.com/12417.html
The input values depend on the power source. An old train set power pack will have enough wattage to run several dozen LEDs, depending on their power consumption. Unloaded, these usually provide around 16V DC. Under load that will drop, but I'd use 16V as the nominal input voltage when calculating the resistor values, so as to ensure the resistors will drop the voltage into the safe range. LEDs like incandescent bulbs will last longer with lower voltage.

IMO you should never use a single power source for trains and accessories. On the contrary, each type of accessory (lighting, signals, animations) should have its own power supply.
To reduce the amount of wiring, you can use common return (common ground/earth), just make sure you use a colour coding scheme, and adhere to it strictly. Eg, Green for common ground, and for the hot side, Red for train power, Yellow for lights, Blue for signals, etc. Controls (switches, timing devices, etc) must always be placed in the hot side of the circuit. The ground sides of all power supplies are wired together using this method.
HTH Wolf K.
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