Why is called HO?

Why not xyz or abcxyz

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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (daniel peterman) wrote in

Modellers can still work in HO when Hung Over unlike N or Z, which require finer motor skills. (Btw, N stands for "No way" and "Z" stands for "You're better off sleeping.")
;-)
Puckdropper
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wrote:

Actually, HO stands for "Horribly Oversized" whereas N stands for "Normal".....
Franz T.
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snipped-for-privacy@thefinalfrontiernet.net says...

N scale also means "in scale," as opposed to "out of scale." Likewise, N gauge means "in gauge," as opposed to "out of gauge."
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Ken Rice -=:=- kennrice (AT) erols (DOT) com
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Ken Rice wrote:

9mm x 160 = 1440mm compared to 1435mm for standard gauge. 9mm x 152.4 (UK) = 1372mm (63mm narrow) 9mm x 150 (Japan) 50mm compared to 1067mm (287mm wide)
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Japan has two scales for N-scale. Most non-Shinkansen trains are narrow gauge, and are modeled at 1/150. The Shinkansen trains are standard gauge, so they are modeled at 1/160.
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Ken Rice wrote:

Now you see why the designation refers to gauge first and scale second - either "n-scale" is or "n scale" isn't!
Regards, Greg.P.
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Greg Procter wrote:

British N scale is 1:148.
2mm finescale (1:152.1) uses 9.43mm gauge.
P160 finescale uses 8.97mm gauge.
Cheers David
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David Bromage wrote:

Good point - I was going for a logical figure ;-)

Is that a typing error? 1 foots worth of millimeters divided by 2mm equals 152.4, not 152.1?

Who uses that?
Regards, Greg.P.
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Greg Procter wrote:

They just say 1:152.

All the the P160 literature I've seen is in German so draw your own conclusions. :)
Cheers David
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David Bromage wrote:

Ahh, like the yanks with HO - they start with a non-rational set of factors, round them to make them both less accurate and different to everyone elses and then claim them to be the ultimate!

Tough call - perhaps the Lichtensteineans(?)

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David Bromage wrote:

Ahh, like the yanks with HO - they start with a non-rational set of factors, round them to make them both less accurate and different to everyone elses and then claim them to be the ultimate! =8^)

Tough call - perhaps the Lichtensteineans(?)

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David Bromage wrote:

Just can't measure 9.00mm I guess.
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Wolf K wrote:

No, it's 0.03mm gauge widening in curves.
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On Mon, 27 Nov 2006 23:56:30 GMT, Franz T wrote:

Er, uh, "normal" must mean two foot high rails, eh? Even Code 55 in N is verrrry heavy rail, and the more common Code 80 is insanely oversized.
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Steve

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I thought N meant "Non Scale" :)
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"Half O".
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Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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daniel peterman wrote:

Back in 1891 Maerklin exhibited the first standardized track systems which would be extendable, as opposed to trainsets which came in a box with no add-ons available. Those were gauges 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1 (48mm). 5, 4, and 2, are long forgotten by most people. In 1900 Ma introduced the smaller again 0 gauge (35mm).
As you can perhaps see, they had rather cornered themselves (and the rest of us) for further size reductions.
The next step was "00", which was applied by various manufacturers to any gauge smaller than "0"
"H0" (letter H, number 0) was applied to 16-16.5mm gauge which was about exactly half 0 gauge.
"TT" was a US gauge refering to "Table Top". "000" was the logical/illogical next reduction from "00" and perhaps should have been H00, being half 00 scale. In the US it was named "HHH" but the first commercial models were N scale from Europe.
The "N" scale name was coined in Europe, "N" being shorthand for Nine/Neuf/etc as 9 starts with N in most European languages.
"Z" came from Maerklin aiming to make the smallest practical working scale/gauge.
Since WWII the terms have slowly morphed from refering to gauge to refering to scale, except for in Britain and with LGB.
Every once in a while someone will suggest we have a more rational scale/gauge system such as I gauge being called "(1:)32/45mm" and H0 "87/16.5" etc but of course humans aren't rational creatures.
Regards, Greg.P.
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Greg Procter spake thus:

Where do you get this "Maerklin"? Nobody spells it that way; it's "Mrklin".
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If you don't have an umlaut on your keyboard, and as an umlaut isn't used in English, then it is replaced with an "e". So "Maerklin" is a 'correct' English spelling.
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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