Internal Fire End of Season Event

I've put a few pictures up from the Internal Fire event at the weekend:
http://www.tangye.org/gallery/album39
As always a very good do, with lots of new exhibits (some of which we
managed to get running, with various degrees of success) - I look forward to next year when, no doubt there will be much more stuff installed and running.
Cheers
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Howden wrote:

A good time was had by all, thanks are due to the many volunteers. Well worth the long journey from deepest zummerzet.
FWIW, I was the guy pushing 'er_indoors around in a wheelchair.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Good pics Dan. Question, in picture
http://www.tangye.org/gallery/album42/06100722_G
a close up of the Petter lighting plant, what is the coil thing in the foreground? I can see the magneto on the left, so it's not HT supply - but what is it?
Personally speaking, I was not especially useful in Kent & could have done both Sodbury & Internal Fire as it turned out. Bugger ..........
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Lister and maybe Petter used a bit of load sensing trickery to adjust the throttle when a load was suddenly applied, it could be that or a shut-down solenoid if the plant was originally an automatic starting type.
Our CD diesel has something like that on it.
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Luton, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.prepair.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm reliably informed off list that the coil in question operated the float chamber drain & is used to turn the engine off.
These rare engines were used in rural telephone exchanges and had wall mounted fuel tanks.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They certainly were used in Rural automatic telephone exchanges, but although they must be quite rare now (I have the said exchanges they were used at, at home, and just can't find one ;-{ ) they certainly weren't rare in the begining. The GPO had well over 1500 rural exchanges, and these plants were specified where no mains electricity was available, and at a rough guess I think that would be more than 40 (as the sign on it says...).
The proceedure for using them was this: The were used to charge wet lead-acid batteries, and there was a power board associated with the engine and batteries. The maintenance man would visit the exchange about once a week (to do some maintence on the exchange, and to charge the batteries). He would take the SG reading of the cells, which would allow him to work out how long a charge he would need to give the battery. He would then set a watt-hour-meter and start the engine. He would now leave and continue on his round. When the watt-hour-meter had recorded the correct amount of charge, a relay would operate on the power board, and the fuel cut-off would operate, shutting down the engine.
Hope this has cast a little light on the subject..
Andy G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hi Andy, I was the maintenance Technical Officer at 10 small rural exchanges about 1970 but although they were in small rural villages they all were mains powered. There was a parking space alongside for a trailer generator in case of power line outages. I bought a similar site about 15 years ago to store my engine collection & it has the same generator park alongside.
--
Dave Croft
Warrington
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They certainly were used in Rural automatic telephone exchanges, but although they must be quite rare now (I have the said exchanges they were used at, at home, and just can't find one ;-{ ) they certainly weren't rare in the begining. The GPO had well over 1500 rural exchanges, and these plants were specified where no mains electricity was available, and at a rough guess I think that would be more than 40 (as the sign on it says...).
The proceedure for using them was this: The were used to charge wet lead-acid batteries, and there was a power board associated with the engine and batteries. The maintenance man would visit the exchange about once a week (to do some maintence on the exchange, and to charge the batteries). He would take the SG reading of the cells, which would allow him to work out how long a charge he would need to give the battery. He would then set a watt-hour-meter and start the engine. He would now leave and continue on his round. When the watt-hour-meter had recorded the correct amount of charge, a relay would operate on the power board, and the fuel cut-off would operate, shutting down the engine.
Hope this has cast a little light on the subject..
Andy G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 10 Oct 2006 11:14:46 +0100, "Kim Siddorn"

You mean your side won this time ? ;-)
Andrew Heggie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Naa, that's this weekend coming. I was on a school visit Friday then at our permanent site.
Harold v William is this weekend .............
Regards,
Kim Siddorn - who, upon the 14th of October, has an engagement on a ridge in Sussex. There, sword in hand, he will do his best to turn away the Norman invader but will inevitably die with his king.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Kim Siddorn wrote:

At Battle or nearby?
Tom
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.