Looking for Fordson Super Major parts

Hi folks,
I'm looking for some parts for a 1963 Fordson Super Major (fitted in a
JCB 3C digger). I need the following:
* Radiator (in good condition)
*
Six-bladed radiator cooling fan (not the standard fan, I believe)
Anyone know where I might get them? If you have them for sale, or know
of a source, please e-mail me (cdt22 AT cantabgold DOT net) or post here.
Many thanks,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
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Near me there is E.Warburton, who have advertised breaking JCBs in the Farmers Guardian for longer than I can remember. 0161 9281501
Surely any fan that fits would do the job? Radiators - I don't know where you are but Warrington Commercial Radiators did a re-core of a Field Marshall radiator for be earlier this year - not too expensive.
Julian.
Reply to
Julian
Probably better off! It's hard to see one overheating in British climatic conditions, probably the exact opposite. (which is bad for a Diesel) Unless your contemplating the speed digging championships! I've got a loader tractor that struggles to warm up when used for loader work, and the back actor on a JCB barely even makes the engine work at all.
If you're deperate for a six bladed one then maybe the spares section of Tractor & Machinery or maybe one of the Fordson Spares dealers.
New radiator cores are very short lived compared to old designs. My '46 Field Marshall still has 3 out of its 4 original radiators. The one I had re-cored is done with a modern matrix - probably very efficient at exchanging heat but I bet 10 years is all it will last for.
Julian.
Reply to
Julian
I called Eric Warburton about some other parts a while back. He said he doesn't keep anything this old.
Well, I was hoping to find the correct six-bladed fan (mine has two blades missing).
The radiator is probably fixable, but I'm not sure if it will be economical. New radiators are available, but I'm not sure if they're as good as the originals, or if they're cheap reproductions. Anyone know?
Thanks for the thoughts.
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Blimey, maybe if you've got serious work lined up for the thing then a more recent model would be the WTG? IMHO the very old models are only good for the occasional bit of ditching work, self build or finding a blocked field drain on a farm - or at least that's what they use them for around here :-) Many are so poor that you would never dream of taking them up the road!
Bore glazing, sooted injectors and stinking blue smokey exhausts as a rule.
But the trouble is (as I just found out) the radiator refurb companies can only generally lay their hands on modern core material for the job. The chap I dealt with in Warrington indicated that it might be possible to source core material made to an older pattern but suggested that it may not be cheap. I take it your doing some sort of classic digger restoration to be worried about such things - given that old JCBs are pretty cheap things?
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Julian.
Reply to
Julian
It depends on the size of the back actor, and JCB made them in a good many different sizes. A small one won't work the engine too hard. But I find that a big one can get the engine pretty hot.
Out of curiousity, what happens to a diesel which isn't warm enough?
I was thinking of replacing the fan at the same time as I was getting the radiator fixed or replaced. This is because the existing fan has some cracks in it, and I don't want a blade to break off and stick in the radiator.
That's what I was wanting to know. I had a suspicion this might be the case. I will try to get the original radiator fixed, or find a refurbished one.
Many thanks,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Old diggers still dig okay, if you give them a bit of care and attention. My friend Dave managed to dig up a buried gate with it recently:
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Maybe it wasn't too hot them. It is a bit smoky, even though I had the injection pump serviced. After some hard digging the block is just too hot to touch. Not really hot even to burn your hand though.
Yes, it's more for fun than use. They're not as cheap as they used to be, though. I seriously doubt you could buy a new one and save money instead of replacing the radiator!
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Who said anything about buying a ''new one?'' I merely suggested that ''Blimey, maybe if you've got serious work lined up for the thing then a more recent model would be the WTG?'' which was in response to your original claim:
But as it so happens, you essentially retract that statement here:
So, if you need a new radiator then just get the thing re-cored as cheaply as posible - it's not worth getting exited about what is essentially a play thing that sees the occasional bit of serious use.
Julian.
Reply to
Julian
Well, I meant new as in "new to me", rather than new as in "brand new".
Actually, the first statement still stands. JCB made four sizes of backhoe loader based on the Fordson Super Major, and the larger ones will inevitably work the engine harder than the smaller ones.
What I'm not sure about is whether the engine is getting too hot. I was just a little surprised that the rocker cover was too hot to touch after an hour's digging. But thinking about it, this is probably okay. I have seen smaller engines get this hot.
Not sure if it needs re-coring. It's just the joint where the filler pipe is attached which is damaged.
Are these the people in Warrington you were talking about?
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Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Just get a stick of plumbers solder, a mole skin, some flux, scotchbrite it clean and remake the joint. (IMO)
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Yes, that's who I used. They are quite helpful people, but you don't get that impression when you first see the place. I'm sure they will be quite happy to repair the rad for you - I suppose they might refuse if the rest of the thing is pretty much shot at and they won't put their name to it!
Julian.
Reply to
Julian
Thanks. I'll give them a call.
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy

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