Mk 15 Villiers

I've been after one of these little overhead valve engines in a desultory
fashion for some time. I've chased four without success, but finally
collared one with a stuck valve for about twenty-five quid on e-bay a few
weeks ago.
The more exciting ST flat twin has taken my attention recently, but I
finally got around to the Villiers yesterday. It was neglected & filthy
dirty, thus preserving the remains of its green paint. After cleaning with
Gunk (not the same as the product I used in my youth - ah, the smell on a
hot engine ;o)) )The rusty steel bits were actually brightened considerably
by the cautious application of a brass wire brush & an oily rag, discovering
a lot more painted surface than was immediately obvious - this apro pos of
our running conversation here about whether to repaint or not ;o))
As it starts & runs just fine, I've decided to ignore the occasionally
sticky valve & see if it gets worse or better before investigating.
The leaking petrol tap (round barrel) was removed & an Enott's tap (flat
slide) was recorked & fitted. This was then beyond the reach of the pipe, so
I turned the tank around.
HAH!
The tank had been sat on by a giant, requiring squashing in a padded vice to
regain its shape. The straps were all distorted & needed straightening.
Whatever had filled the rust holes at one end fell off & the hole needed
re-sealing (Plastic Metal at thus stage - we'll see .........) Took all
evening.
And now we are ready to run without a "pouring out" tap - which is exactly
what I'm going to do after breakfast.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Time flies like an arrow
Fruit flies like a banana
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
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Well, that was almost boring. Started first pull, fuel system & tank continent, even ticks over (lumpily).
Now to find it something to drive.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Time flies like an arrow Fruit flies like a banana
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
The engine arrived fixed to a scruffy block of wood with wood screws. These I have discarded, but was surprised to find that the heavy bit of 2" thick timber is English oak. Planed, sanded & bevel edged, it looks pretty good in plain varnish.
I have decided to use it to drive one of my odd electrical devices. It is fitted with a vee pulley & rejoices in no less than three commutators, two at one end of the armature & one at the other. It is open framed and after fiddling with the leads, it motors on 12 volts at high speed - 6/7k, I'd guess. The other two comms are without their brushes or wiring & I wonder at the label which describes it as a 240volt, 50 cycle AC device. You can see a photo of it at
formatting link
and would welcome any thoughts about wiring the other two commutators - or not!
My thought was to encourage it to produce 200 odd volts to drive a bulb through a big old potentiometer. The latter would be mounted on a board with ammeter & voltmeter within reach of the public. Turning the knob would make the engine grunt, the dials move & the bulb glow brighter.
Cause and effect in an inter-reactive display!
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Time flies like an arrow Fruit flies like a banana
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
Looks remarkably like a rather elderly frequency converter to me, but I may well be wrong. If it's OK by you, I'll print a copy and ask a mate (retired industrial sparky). Wish I'd known you wanted a Mk.15. Local scrapyard had a tidy one for a fiver a coupla months ago. I've got one on a Howard Bantam which might be sold at some point. After I've excavated the byre far enough to get it out that is... Cheers, Scruff.
Kim Siddorn wrote:
Reply to
scruffybugger
Yes please, do copy photo to whoever can help!
I might have a home for another one in due course.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Time flies like an arrow Fruit flies like a banana
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
The Mk 15 is now properly bolted to it's polished & varnished oak block. The three commutator rotating device was renovated with a judicious brass wire brush clean, masked the non-painted bits & replicated the satin black finish very closely with Plastic Bumper spray from my local motor factors. I then sealed the armature windings with red paint & it looks quite good. Finally, it was bolted to the base plate from below.
By dint of a length of string, a nice, new drive belt was obtained from Antifriction Components Ltd - Units 5-6 & 8-9, The Commercial Centre, Days Rd, St. Philips, Bristol, BS2 0QS - 0117 955 6678. It is the second time they had a belt that no one else could supply & I'm impressed but not involved - if you get my meaning ;o)) They have a £10.00 minimum cash sale policy ........
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Time flies like an arrow Fruit flies like a banana
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
In another thread it was pointed out that one must never take anything for granted. You'll recall I'd recorked an Enott's tap & fitted it. Since then, the beast was hard to start & wouldn't run for long.
Tonight, I ran a bit of 1/6" welding rod up through the tap & met resistance. Just because the tap doesn't leak & has nice new corks, it doesn't mean it isn't blocked ...........
Brrrm!
Tomorrow, adventures with a trailer ;o))
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
Kim Siddorn

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