Bachmann Jinty & K3

writes


Not just photos, alas, but a lot of digital technology is already difficult to access after a few years. A friend of mine is a fairly senior bod in the world of archives, and tells me that it is usually more difficult to access any sort of digital file more than a few years old than it is analogue (usually written/printed) stuff dating back many centuries. It's one of the major problems in her field apparently. Brian
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Salvι
diskussionsgruppsmeddelandet:cpeol8$5r3$1$ snipped-for-privacy@news.demon.co.uk...

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yes the documentary opened my eyes, I have a largeish video collection and now that DVD is taking over there are some that I want to keep but the problem of transferring from vhs to dvd etc is a hassle, and I'm not even sure as to its legality, Just think of our hobby without Ivo Peters or any of the other photographers, a quiet browse through a book filled with their photographs is a real joy, and an eye opener,When in twenty years the present generation of enthusiasts go to look back on their hobbywill they actually be able to access their own memories?! There are other problems , its quite possible to blow up a conventional photo but try to do the same with a 72dpi image, even with photoshop! the detail becomes rather more than just grainy!! Beowulf
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"BH Williams" wrote

difficult
Overstated problem in my opinion. Even if the method of saving jpegs or tiffs becomes outdated there is every likelihood that bridging software will be available, and as computers get faster, then rewriting from one format to another will be a quick matter.
Don't forget also that photographic negatives and slides also deteriorate, and that scanning and saving in digital form *might* be the best method of preserving them.
John.
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On Sat, 11 Dec 2004 16:48:31 -0000, "John Turner"
John,

If you talk to librarians or archivists, a major ongoing problem is refreshing or changing the format of modern media. Even with super fast copying methods, it would still be a very major task.

Modern photographic stock is very stable and if you talk to Kodak or Fuji, they will start talking about a life of many tens of years, (if not hundreds) if the material is stored in reasonable conditions. One of their selling points for the photographic medium is reliable genuine long term archival storage.
And you don't need to look far for other proof. I've got photographs in my house which were taken at the turn of last century which makes them well over 100 years old. They've been kept in an album in a drawer with no special storage conditions, and they probably look as good as the day they were made.
Jim.
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"Jim Guthrie" wrote

Whilst I won't disagree with this, I think it fair to say that the average railway enthusiast will find it easier to store an image digitally than find the time to properly catalogue and file conventional images.

And I have a fair number (stretching into hundreds) of monochrome negatives dating back to the 30s, some of which are in excellent condition, but others which are sadly scratched and mold infested. I've also got stacks of 35mm transparancies from the 50s and 60s which have been horribly neglected by previous owners and for which scanning and digital storage are probably the only cost-effective means of preserving them for the future.
John.
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Also, computer users are famous - notorious, in fact - for NOT creating backups.
I'd rather trust hard copy than hard disk copy, though keeping both is the best option.
--
Brian
"Reality rarely lives up to TV, usually because reality has a smaller budget
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Jim Guthrie wrote:

I believe that NASA have warehouses full of data (from the 1960s) on disks and/or tapes but because the data is stored in obsolete format(s) they have to rely on a very small stock of extremely elderly and temperamental disk/tape readers.
--
Bruce Fletcher
(To reply replace figure 1 with letter i)
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Bruce Fletcher wrote:

Those people must surely be approaching retirement age?
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Can't think why this is such a problem.
I draw material from 3" discs that were formatted on an Amstrad CPC computer.
Even for that machine there are several file format converters that do mass copying/converting.
--
Brian



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On 11/12/2004 21:19, Brian Watson wrote,

Perhaps NASA haven't got an Amstrad CPC :-)
--
Paul Boyd
http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk /
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Paul Boyd wrote:-

Of course not they use a Sinclair ZX80 built from a kit :o)
(kim)
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Which explains why they can't put a man on Mars.
CPC's had a game in which you could in 1985.
--
Brian
"Reality rarely lives up to TV, usually because reality has a smaller budget
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It's the same with old TV archives, that are stored on obsolete media.
--
Martin S.

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wrote:

Doesn't seem to stop 'em turning up on UK Gold.
--
Brian
"Reality rarely lives up to TV, usually because reality has a smaller budget
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Martin S wrote:-

The National Film Archive long ago foresaw the problem of important early TV broadcasts being lost to posterity and so mounted a movie camera over an upward facing TV screen to record 405-line transmissions onto 35mm film. These have actually fared better than the BBC's own recordings made later on videotape.
(kim)
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Jim Guthrie wrote:

Unfortunately a great deal of more recent photographic material is considerably less stable. The acetate base material is turning to vinegar. Most film from the '50s onward is affected and can deteriorate within as little as 30 years.
Mark Thornton
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wrote:

OTOH, libraries are busy converting archived dead trees into digital formats.
Isn't part of the problem obsolete hardware and storage media, rather than the data itself? I can't read my old school projects, which are on 5.25" disks in some proprietory text editor format, but I /can/ read my old university project (should some unlikely situation require it), which is a PDF stored on a few different networked computers. We can still read HTML 3.2 documents, even though it is obsolete, and Opera 7 is almost unrecognisable from something like Netscape 4.
A JPEG might still be readable, a JPEG on a 3.5" floppy might not be. I reckon the big snag will be all the crap photos to wade through, once people aren't thinking "Jessops will charge me for developing a pointless picture if I waste a shot on this"!
--
Arthur Figgis Surrey, UK

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For £45-00? Its not perfect, but then again it's not a 'perfect' price either is it? It's less than the cost of a couple of resin wagon kits plus wheels and bearings and if I can build those I'm sure I could fix the jinty's imperfections if they bothered me that much. As far as the price goes it's in the cheaper end of the market. If I bought the Eureka Garrett and found a comparable problem then I might feel I had grounds to complain about it. If you want perfection you pay accordingly - if you don't pay you can't reasonably complain without sounding petty.
--
Ian Birchenough

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"Ian Birchenough" wrote

I'm not disputing any of that, but someone asked me what I thought of the model and I gave an opion which said apart from the chimney I thought it was superb.
Shame they don't all run as well as they look. This is one loco where your MUST see it run before buying. There are some real dogs amongst them.
John.
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"Chris Nevard"

Excellent modelling.
-- Cheers Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway (Site now back up and working) http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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