Correct scale for N gauge

Wolf Kirchmeir wrote:


(Nearly) Correct scale 1:160 uses 8.97mm track gauge: http://www.raw-nette.de/nbahn2o.htm This being considerably finer than commercial N.
I don't think anyone does dead-scale in 1:160 or 1:152.

Which is why 2mm Scale uses 9.42mm as the track gauge, this being correct.
And why 2mm Scale, when there is a perfectly good N standard at 1:160 ? Answer because the 2mm Scale Association got there first, and had its standards up and running before N appeared, had the a layout at shows in the early 1960s which ran without faults for several days at a time (be they stalls or derailments)..... And yes, our advice was offered to the embryonic N makers.

The UK has an honourable tradition of stupid model standards: - we have those who made OO rather than HO for the UK, - those who said that Scalefour couldn't work (and nodoubt the same about ScaleSeven), - those who said it was impossible to run two track mainline in OOO (predecessor to 2mm and N) because the magnets in the locos would cause the locos to stick together, etc...
Common thread seems to be armchair theory rather than experimental practise.

There is still a large market in 3ft gauge models using that standard.
- Nigel
--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/
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Nigel Cliffe wrote:

[...]
0.03 mm less than 9mm - wow! NB that a sheet of 20lb copy paper is almost exactly 0.1mm thick. There's something a bit more than mere obsessiveness at work here.

Within the usual manufacturing tolerances, yes they do.

Which ones? AFAIK, the first commercially viable N scale was by German firms. UK's Lesney made Trebl-O-Lectric, which IIRC was neither fish nor fowl. Anyhow, the few items (diecast) that I have here are to no recognisable scale.

Yes, I know, I just want to know who started the the 1:148 scale - Graham Farish? Lesney?

That's often the problem. I recall the argy-bargy when NMRA proposed the RP25 wheel profile. It wasn't accepted until a thousand or so wheel sets had been made and tested on several club layouts for weeks and months, and an extended report ran not only in The Bulletin but also in the commercial press. The report proved that the engineering types who proposed the finer standard (after their own testing of several candidate profiles) were correct. Even so, it took several years before major manufacturers such as Mantua/Tyco made RP25 wheels.
NMRA now has a "fine scale" standard (or maybe it's still an RP), still not exact scale, with an even finer wheel profile, and the track (turnout) dimensions to suit.
[...]
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"Wolf Kirchmeir" wrote

I suspect it was Peco, but that's said with suspicion rather than knowledge. They were the first serious players in the UK r-t-r N-gauge market. I believe it was they that instigated British N-gauge at 2.0625mm to 1 foot.
John.
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On Mon, 3 Oct 2005 21:40:37 +0100, "John Turner"

Could some of the continental models be built using a different length of foot (ie not 304.8mm), which might distort the fifth or sixth decimal place or so? :-)
--
Arthur Figgis Surrey, UK

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John Turner wrote:

I think Peco as well, but also lack proof without asking a number of people present at the time.
- Nigel
--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/
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wrote:
Nigel,

Why only the past tense? :-)
Jim.
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From a Kato catalogue, on 9mm gauge track their models of ordinary 1067mm gauge trains are to a scale of 1:150, which gives an equivalent gauge of 1350mm, rather too wide. However, their Shinkansen models (std. gauge) are to 1:160, equivalent gauge of 1440mm, which is pretty close. I think that the Japanese manufacturer MicroAce makes their small historical steam loco models to 1:140, which would equate to 1260mm, which is still a bit big. Regards, Bill.

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William Pearce wrote:

[...]
Looks like the Japanese are as cavalier about scale/gauge relationships as the Brits. Must be an effect of living on isolated islands... :-)
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Correct scale for UK outline N gauge is 1:148

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N scale (or N gauge) is a popular model railway standard, allowing hobbyists to build layouts that take up less space than HO scale, or pack longer runs containing more detail into a similar amount of space. The name is an abbreviation for Nine millimetres. It is also sometimes called "2 mm to the foot," (1:160) in reference to its scale. Another early N scale was also known as "OOO" or "Treble-O" in reference to O and OO scales and was 1:152.
N scale uses 9 mm gauge track ("N gauge'), and a scale of 1:160 for most of the world. In the United Kingdom where a scale of 1:148 is used because of problems early on in fitting mechanisms into smaller British trains. In Japan 1:150 is used for most trains and trams, to proportion the trains correctly for Japan's 3'6" track gauge, while 1:160 is used for standard gauge Shinkansen (Bullet Train) models.
Although trains and accessories of similar gauge and/or scale existed as early as 1927, modern N scale appeared in 1962. Unlike other scales and gauges, which were de facto standards at best, within two years N scale defined the gauge, voltage, and polarity of track, as well as the height and type of couplers. Electrically N scale uses the same voltage and power levels as HO scale, that is 12v dc for train control and 16v ac for accessories such as point motors. The standard coupling is known as a 'Rapido' coupler and supports automatic coupling and uncoupling. American modellers are increasingly using a different coupler system by Microtrains which also permits delayed uncoupling.
N scale is second only to HO scale in popularity as a modelling scale worldwide. In Japan where space in homes is more limited N scale is the most popular scale and HO scale is considered large. A typical small N scale model railway occupies about 2' x 3' with a layout capable of handling large realistic train lengths occupying about 6' x 2'.
N gauge track and components are also used with larger scales, in particular HOe and 009 scale for modelling narrow gauge railways.
2 mm scale A fair number of modellers in the United Kingdom use 2 mm scale, an older standard than N scale. 2 mm scale, as the name implies, is scaled at 2 mm to the foot (1.152) with a 9.42 mm track gauge. Exact scale track and wheels are used rather than the somewhat coarser N gauge standards.
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