Detachable Welder Leads

I have a Lincoln 225 AC/DC arc welder that I would like to make
detachable leads for. Currently the leads currently used are
permanently attached to the welder. Has anyone done this before and if
so, how did you do it? I would like to attach some type of socket
connector to the welder so one could plug/unplug the leads. I am also
looking at making some extention leads for the welder so I would want
similar in-line connectors used to be available to make the extenstion
set.
Any suggestions, leads or (hint, hint) links to pictures would be
great.
Thanks
TMT
Reply to
Too_Many_Tools
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Go to your local welding supply store and get sets of the Tweco camlock connectors. They are the norm for the application although the DINSE Euro type show up from time to time.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
The local welding supplier will have just what you want. Also, an auto parts store or good hardware store. Forney welding products are sold at many good hardware stores and they make what you want. If the goal is to build it yourself you can still see what works. Bring your calipers, pencil, and paper to make a dimensioned sketch. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
Go to any welding supplier and tell them what you want to do. As mentioned before, twist connectors are a snap. What is not mentioned is that you must be aware of voltage drop that is related to the size and length of cables. Get the right cables, don't make them too long and not too thin/fat. Info at the shop, or online at Lincoln Welding.
Steve
Reply to
Steve B
I done that to my Lincoln ACDC225 years ago, and never regretted it. I used standard twist lock connectors, fastened in the hole they oriignal leads came out of. Worked like a champ.
Reply to
Roy
Try Pearson SK-50 and BK-50 connectors, like ebay item
2566780995
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Reply to
Ignoramus26172
The Tweco "Weldskill" type are the camlocks. They are also cheaper than the DINSE type, note the "Weldskill" are sold as a complete set where the DINSE are individual components. Camlocks are also commonly use in the theater / film / video world for power feeds so you can get them from those supply houses as well.
Pete C.
Reply to
Pete C.
Another solution that has not been mentioned .......... one that I went to on my Miller Thunderbolt after getting a lot of jobs doing metal studs for the Government .................
I got tired of stringing out a lot of lead. I put a longer extension cord on the welder. Easier than stringing leads that get cut/damaged.
Just a thought.
STeve
Reply to
Steve B
also check with forklift companies. The battery connectors from electric forklifts can and are used to great effect for making up extensions leads. And for jump starting cars and big rigs and so forth
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
Reply to
Gunner
One of the reasons that Miller changed to solid connections insead of the tapered plug/socket, is that users would leave them connected all the time, and not clean the connection. Which would lead to corrosion, overheating and potential problems all abd generally leading to liability on Milllers part.
The lawyers at work again, not to mention that a bolted connection requires fewer parts, less expense, more profit.
All this from my Millers rep.
Reply to
John Miller

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