Pictures of one of my projects

One of the houses I worked on in the last few years is featured in this
article
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I did all the railings inside and out, the awning over the main door,
the planters and the master bedroom fireplace.
I know I am not listed at the bottom under resoources.
I am currently trying to find out why.
The publisher is based in New Zealand, and I never knew the article was
even coming up.
The Architect just handed me the magazine in his office.
I am supposed to be in Better Homes and Gardens soon.
Their reporter had a long phone chat with me about my company.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
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It's not necessarily a home that screams 'cozy', but it has a certain panache. Very nice work on that railing... that sweep is very smooth.
Reply to
Mike Graham
I know what you mean about getting left out of the credits. I have had several of my cabinetmaking projects in magazines and the local paper and NEVER was my name mentioned. It was worded to sound like the designer or architect designed, engineered, and built the project. On one of the projects the contractor was mentioned. It's as if they give you a perfect measured working drawing with all details worked out and noted and all you do is build it. I have decided that if you are in a 'profession' then you get or give yourself credit, if you are a tradesman then you are little more than a laborer. I am not a glory hog but it seems the person who has their hands on the project and a good portion of input on HOW to build it should be mentioned.
Ernie Leimkuhler wrote:
Reply to
Jamie Norwood
That's some nice work, quality that's of the sort you'd see in a magazine (if you will...).
I think I'll not venture into the issue of you not being mentioned 'cause you know more about it than me (and that sort of thing ticks me off in a big way) but I'd be interested in how it turns out if you're inclined to let us know.
John
Reply to
JohnM
Getting credit for your work is a big pet peeve with me. For me, I have the biggest issue when someone states that "we are building our own home". Sounds impressive and for most would be a massive undertaking. In almost all cases, they mean they are paying someone to build them a home. Most of these types wouldn't know what end of a hammer to hold. I have met people that have actually built their own home, driven every nail, routed wire, electrical, HVAC...ect. To me that is impressive. The meaning of "having a home built" and "building your own home" are significantly different. For some reason they are used interchangably.
Having massive amounts of money to come up with a crazy idea and paying someone else to execute is a luxury. To be able to execute the crazy idea is indeed a skill, and one to be proud of.
Reply to
gradstdnt
That sweep was hand bent on a table in my driveway with wooden blocks to rack the tube against. It wasn't until 9 months later that I finally built my tubing roller.
The really funny bit is that the first time we went to install that sweep rail we discovered that I had welded all the supports on backwards.
It worked out for the best. The second top tube I bent was much smoother.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
That's just *eerie*, man. I didn't see any visible kinks or 'die marks' in it.
That's the one, is it? I remember you telling the story, and I made mention to it at one point.
Reply to
Mike Graham
Been there, done that, only the filler was Inconel 625. Had to grind out a couple welds. That stuff is tuffer 'n boiled owl!
Ted
Reply to
Ted Edwards
WOW! I am going to go back and do some more polishing. :-)
How did you join those long sweeps of railing and satisfy an SOB client?
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
The longest sweep required a 20' 6" piece of tube, and the 180 grit finish brushed tube only comes in 20' lengths.
So I had to butt weld it on, sand the crap out of it, and then bend it to shape.
I use pre-brushed tube for hand rails. It makes life so much easier.
Now I have a Flex tubing sander that wraps around the tube as it sands the weld away.
I paid $720 for mine. Porter Cable repair has refurbished ones for $358.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
really really nice work, outstanding workmanship! walt
Reply to
wallster
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Mine is the one on the left. I have never seen the one of the right until now, looks cool.
It paid for itself in one $12,000 railing.
It uses 1.5" x 24" belts. I usually buy ceramic or zirconium 3" x 24" belts and split them.
The belt wraps around the tube as you apply pressure. It makes it extremely easy to erase butt welds on tubing, and blend the marks in with the brushed finish on the tube.
I like to demo it to my students using a 36 grit zirconium belt on 3" black iron pipe. In one pass it polishes 1/3 of the circumference of the tube to a uniform brushed finish.
The only other tool anything like it is an air version made by Dynabrade for at least twice the moeny.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Way way cool!
Best to you and all.
Martin
Reply to
Eastburn
Dog gone Ernie how long did it take you to do the whole job for the one railing? But of more interest how did you manage to get a smooth bend of such a large radius? Lots and lots of small bends or what?
John
Please note that my return address is wrong due to the amount of junk email I get. So please respond to this message through the newsgroup.
Reply to
John Flanagan
Fortunately for my wallet the one on the right is not available in the US yet.
My main problem is blending the bead on the acute side of a 60º joint.
Reply to
Glenn Ashmore
Greetings and Salutations...
Those DO look like interesting and useful toys...tools... I suspect that for something like the railing project, it turned what could have been a time-consuming nightmare into a fairly painless process. The only thing that puzzles me a TAD is the 1200 watts in and 700 watts produced fields. Am I goofy, or does this indicate that there is 500 watts disappearing someplace? Since it has been my experience that this sort of thing TENDS to result in heat... something must be getting plenty warm. Regards Dave Mundt
Reply to
Dave Mundt
Other than a rat tail file have you thought of using a soft filler metal over the weld? Like lead or a soft braze then file that?
John
Please note that my return address is wrong due to the amount of junk email I get. So please respond to this message through the newsgroup.
Reply to
John Flanagan
Rack bending is exactly that. Lots of small bends. Before I built my roller is was my only solution. It isn't really all that hard. It just takes a good eye for curves.
Take a small stout table. Bolt it to the ground so it can't move. Screw wood blocks to the top with curved surfaces. slide the tube between the blocks while racking the tube to one side every few inches. The idea is to have a series of small bends that are close enough together to fool the eye. It does take practice, but is extremely cheap to do.
The most critical part is not to allow the tube to rotate, or you end up with a spiral. I usually take the length of tube, and nest it into a length of angle iron, then use the edeg of the angle iron to sharpie marker a line all the way down the tube. This way you have a reference line to keep the tube from rotating accidentally.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Very tricky, that's the thing I was wondering about the most. How to draw a line straight down the side of a tube! Good idea.
But really, $12,000, how much time did it take you? I just want to know in case there's some room for competition :^).
John
Please note that my return address is wrong due to the amount of junk email I get. So please respond to this message through the newsgroup.
Reply to
John Flanagan
Yea, I thought of that as soon as I hit the send key. I can't think of any other way to do it besides filing or *very* fine tig work.
Maybe you can lead it then chrome plate :^).
John
Please note that my return address is wrong due to the amount of junk email I get. So please respond to this message through the newsgroup.
Reply to
John Flanagan

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