Transmitter choice...

I'm looking for my first transmitter...something in the 4-channel line.
Right now I'm currently looking at the JR XF421EX, but I'm also wondering
about other brands of transmitters. In regards to quality and reliability
how do this compare?
Hitec
JR
Futaba
Airtronics
Do all these transmitters work ok with other brands of receivers?
Also, should I buy the complete kits or a stand-alone transmitter and other
electronics to the airplane such as GWS or ?
I'm leaning toward electrics with gliders and parkflyers being my
foreseeable planes. I noticed that the JR XF421EX has two different setups
that you can buy...one with four standard servos and one with two micro
servos. Looks like both of these setups comes with the 610M micro receiver.
Looking for advice here (or someone springing the bucks for a transmitter
would be fine),
Thanks,
Ed
Reply to
intheswamp00
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I'm looking for my first transmitter...something in the 4-channel line. Right now I'm currently looking at the JR XF421EX, but I'm also wondering about other brands of transmitters. In regards to quality and reliability how do this compare?
Hitec JR Futaba Airtronics
Do all these transmitters work ok with other brands of receivers? Also, should I buy the complete kits or a stand-alone transmitter and other electronics to the airplane such as GWS or ?
I'm leaning toward electrics with gliders and parkflyers being my foreseeable planes. I noticed that the JR XF421EX has two different setups that you can buy...one with four standard servos and one with two micro servos. Looks like both of these setups comes with the 610M micro receiver.
Looking for advice here (or someone springing the bucks for a transmitter would be fine), Thanks, Ed =================================== Everyone has preferences but they're all good. I have, and like, a Futaba 6XAS.
Hitec and Futaba transmitters are negative shift. They can control any brand of negative shift receiver. Hitec and Futaba typically can be connected to each other with a trainer cord. JR and Airtronics are positive shift. They can control any brand of positive shift receiver. JR and Airtronics have proprietary trainer systems.
If you can buy a full system with the receiver, servos, and battery you need for your plane; it is "usually" cheaper to buy the system versus piecing it together. The JR XF421EX has two model memory. Depending on how many planes you want to control with one transmitter, model memory can be important.
We have guys in the club with 10 or more planes programmed in one radio; others have 1 transmitter per plane. Neither method is 'better', just different.
Carrell
Reply to
Carrell
wondering
reliability
Radios were discovered over 50 years ago. They are all The same now. I'd say buy a Hitec Eclipse 7. Biggest bang for the buck.
transmitter
Reply to
AAA
On 7/18/2004 5:53 PM Ted shuffled out of his cave and grunted these great (and sometimes not so great) words of knowledge:
Hitec and Futaba are negative shift. Either can control negative shift receivers.
JR and Airtronics are positive shift. Either of them can control positive shift receivers.
Buddy box cords are compatible between Futaba and Hitec. JR and Airtronics have proprietary systems for buddy boxes.
Unless you can get a REALLY GOOD deal, the package price is USUALLY cheaper.
Since you are going to be primarily flying electrics and gliders, I would suggest going with a "micro" setup/package. This will provide the smaller/lighter battery, servos and receiver normally used in these planes.
The brands you mentioned are all good brands and very reliable.
I will make a few suggestions that may be helpful to you:
1. See what brand the MAJORITY of the people at your flying field/area are using and get that brand. If you have a question/problem, manuals are good, but a live person who has knowledge of the radio is better.
2. Find out which channels are the LEAST USED at the field/area you will be flying at and get your radio on one of these channels. There is less chance of you accidentally being "shot down" or shooting someone else down.
3. Try to get a computer type radio. They will allow you to store multiple models in memory and allow you to easily "mix" some functions which you may need/want for the gliders.
If you want to try putting a system together yourself, some of these hobby shops may have prices you will like:
Balsa products
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Hut
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City
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Hope this helps.
Reply to
Ted Campanelli
Well, yes and no. The Airtronics RD6000 and RD8000 are shift selectable. Yeah, I'm biased...I love Airtronics radios.
To the original poster: I know you were looking for a basic 4 channel radio but why do that when for about 100 bucks more you can get a computer radio that will grow with you as you progress. Plus it's easier to sell if you decide RC is not for you.
Don
Reply to
Don Hatten
The Hitec Eclipse is also shift selectable so it can work with most FM receivers.
Most of the FM units being sold today work quite well. Some are easier to use than others. Many of the high-end radios also support Pulse Code Modulation (PCM). However, everybody's PCM coding is different from any of the others. So, at some point in time, you might find yourself wanting to stick with a specific brand.
I always recommend that a new pilot hook up with an instructor. It is usually best if you and he use compatible equipment. The trainer function on the transmitter is very useful, and having incompatible gear eliminates a major learning tool.
Jim - AMA 501383
D> Well, yes and no. The Airtronics RD6000 and RD8000 are shift
Reply to
James D Jones
Take a look at the Multiplex EVO range - nothing beats them on spec and quality!
Gordon.
Reply to
Gordon upton

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