Boy Scouts electrocuted in deadly Texas boating accident

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AVINGER, Texas -- Authorities say two Texas Boy Scouts were killed and
another was critically hurt when their sailboat hit an overhead power line
and apparently electrocuted the youths.
The Texas Parks & Wildlife Department says the accident happened Saturday
afternoon at Lake O' The Pines near Avinger, 150 miles east of Dallas.
Agency spokesman Steve Lightfoot said the Boy Scouts, ages 18 and 16, died
at the scene. Their names weren't immediately released.
CBS affiliate KYTX-TV reports 11-year-old Thomas Larry was critically
injured and was hospitalized in Shreveport, Louisiana.
All were from Troop 620 in Hallsville and wore personal flotation devices.
Lightfoot says the catamaran was on fire, with sails up, when game wardens
arrived.
Lightfoot says the preliminary investigation indicates the sailboat came
in contact with the power line.
Boy Scout members, teachers and friends shared stories about the boys
killed in the accident and sang "Amazing Grace" during a candlelight
vigil, according to KYTX-TV.
Comments:
Avatar
rwsmith29456 • 18 minutes ago
Were there signs or any attempt to keep boats with masts from crossing
under the lines. Methinks the power company or whoever was responsible for
the line is going to be in deep kimchee.

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Avatar
Oderfodog2 • 37 minutes ago
"Boy Scouts accidentally electrocuted in deadly Texas boating accident."
Just like they were "accidentally" sodomized in my Scout Troop by the
Scout Master's sixteen year-old Explorer Scout son.

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Avatar
DyePhags • an hour ago
jomo scout leader too busy molesting below decks to avoid electric lines.

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2old4thizschit DyePhags • an hour ago
Flagged and blocked. You serve no purpose on this planet.

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adamdrussell • 3 hours ago
Im fairly sure a 120v line would not set the boat on fire. Was the line
high voltage? Shouldnt be strung that low.
1
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whatsamatteryou • 3 hours ago
R.I.P. how sad
1
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pbinCA • 5 hours ago
Taking a sailboat out on Lake O' The Pines with mast taller than "x"
should be strictly prohibited.
3
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Adingoatemybaby pbinCA • 4 hours ago
Stringing power lines lower than "y" should also be strictly prohibited.
3
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Dubiakuw • 5 hours ago
That had to be some high-voltage line. Who thought stringing it low over
Lake O' The Pines was a good idea?
5
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TonyRomano63 • 6 hours ago
Amazing grace, seriously.
2
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Dubiakuw TonyRomano63 • 5 hours ago
THAT'S what you focus on here? Though I oppose ridiculous superstition in
any form, the song was hardly the focus.

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Avatar
Bocephus_Moonshine Dubiakuw • 3 hours ago
As a fellow atheist, I think you should stop being a d!ck about this. To
the devoutly religious, this means something, and it does absolutely no
harm to you.

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Avatar
DyePhags Bocephus_Moonshine • an hour ago
he hates God and religion because they don't accept poo pushers or those
getting their poo pushed in.

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Bocephus_Moonshine DyePhags • 41 minutes ago
You seem awfully obsessed with that particular body part.

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newsman5 Dubiakuw • 4 hours ago
Well, the song was written by a sailor.
3
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Reply to
Leroy N. Soetoro
Loading thread data ...
<snip crap>
There was an incident like that when I was a kid on a lake where we had a cabin. The lake level was high and a sail boat lost control and drifted or was blown where power distribution lines passed near the shore line (over the water at the time), its mast struck the overhead distribution line and two people were killed. The newspaper story reported the distribution line voltage was 4800 volts. That power line and another one that passed over a channel were moved shortly thereafter.
Reply to
Michael Moroney
Hello, and your story, while tragic, isn't anything new. There's a number of instances over the decades where a metallic conductor (antenna mast, etc) from a ground vehicle came into contact with an overhead medium voltage distribution line and people were either killed or seriously injured. In some instances where the vehicle was insulated from earth via its tires the occupant(s) was able to jump clear of the vehicle and survive. Given that many of today's MV lines on utility poles have line-to-earth potentials of 19 kV or higher, maintaining a safe clearance distance can't be overstated. Sincerely,
Reply to
J.B. Wood

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