Epoxy

for epoxies available over the counter ( not commercial specialty) most are two part resin based, to be mixed like a liquid initially
this appeals to small , unique and one time fixes.
thin applications are ideal, as most ofthese areNOT meant to be filler types, unless specificcaly stated
thin narrow space between parts creates incredible strength when properly epoxied, never 'rely' on the epoxy to become strong like the materials you are joining
except someepoxy may be actualy stronger,, then you just end up breakin the fixed part in some other place when it is used badly agaon!
filled and putty type epoxies , granted they do not 'run' when applied. technically diferent formulations
silicone sealants when cured wil offer high strength when used correctly ( thin, well prepared)
acrylic based fillers provide similar opportuinites.
polymers come in many shades of performance and coloration,
dont get hung upon 'the same old thing', the chemists are busy as we sit on asses typing ...................................
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On Thu, 20 Mar 2008 21:09:14 GMT, Esther & Fester Bestertester

Dunno if it's tough enough but I use GR epoxy glue from Industrial Formulations. 24 hour cure. (Sometimes a pita.) Here in BC. http://www.indform.com / "We have an epoxy system for almost any project". Really?? :P
All I know is that GR epoxy has less flex than Lepage 2 page epoxy (dual syringe) I got from the hardware store.
D from BC British Columbia Canada
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On Thu, 20 Mar 2008 19:03:05 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@comic.com wrote:

Nothing to add.. Just checking my usenet client settings. Ignore this part..
D from BC British Columbia Canada
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To those who offer help even to the misguided, thank you for the benefit of your knowledge.
To those who offer directions to the appropriate forum, thanks for the (index) finger. :-)
FBtf
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Esther & Fester Bestertester wrote:

sci.polymers or sci.materials might be a better bet. There are two general ways you can make a given epoxy harder: bake it (an hour at 100C does wonders) or put filler in it.
If you're bonding hard materials, you might want to use a glass bead filler. When you squeeze the bondline down, the spheres contact the surface, and as the epoxy shrinks (1% or so), it applies a preload to the glass/substrate interfaces. That's a pretty stiff joint.
If you're trying to do something in shear, e.g. attach a strain gauge, glue is not your friend at all. You might be better off using solder or indium bonding or something like that.
Cheers,
Phil Hobbs
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wrote:

Rubinno cement made by Singer Kearfott in the 70's was used on guidance systems for the Sram missile, PC3, and A7 navey fighter jets. It is the best there is.
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Google turns up zero hits. Is the correct spelling? Any web references you can give?
Thanks, FBt
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On Fri, 21 Mar 2008 18:36:53 GMT, Esther & Fester Bestertester

It is probably $50 a quart. Minimum.
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But that doesn't help me know *where*.
FBt
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On Sat, 22 Mar 2008 03:54:02 GMT, Esther & Fester Bestertester

Try this one:
EPOTEK
http://www.epotek.com/categories.asp?ID=1
There are several that would easily fit your needs, and some that are sold at small qty tube level.
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wrote:

Try: Kearfott Guidance & Navigation Corporation 1150 McBride Avenue Little Falls, New Jersey 07424-2500, USA
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Gerald Newton wrote:

What exactly was it used for? For securing components in a high vibration environment, that might damp the vibrations that the OP wants to transmit.
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Esther & Fester Bestertester wrote:

I believe that (Shore) is a measure of resistance to indentation. In other words, pressure. You might need something else, depending on which direction the vibration is acting with respect to the surface. A pressure wave will result in both pressure and tensile stresses on the adhesive. A shear wave will result in (duh) shear stresses.
In addition, you need to define what you mean by 'transmit vibration'. I'm not a mechanical guy, but I'd be willing to bet that the problem of maximizing mechanical energy transmission is analogous to that of maximizing electromagnetic energy transmission. That is: It is optimal when the impedance (modulus of elasticity?) is closely matched and energy reflection is minimized.
The strength of the adhesive only becomes important if the amplitude of the vibration approaches the strength limit of the bond.
This appears to be the sort of problems that people designing sonar transducers have to deal with.
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Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:

I saw something on Blue Whales the other day that mentioned they are the loudest creature. I looked it up and the figure is 188dB (like being next to a rocket) ...and there is great controversy about SONAR use because it is thought (due to weird behavior like healthy-appearing specimens beaching themselves) that it is so loud that it damages the hearing of whales.
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Well, we used an epoxy (simple two part) to 'glue' mounts for vibration monitoring equipment. The accelerator was in a magnetic housing and we epoxied steel rings (not much more than washers really) to rotating equipment at key points of bearings etc...). The mounts/washers provided a nice flat, properly oriented surface for the vibration pickup so we could do 'sound cuts'.
Two fold, 1) we wanted to know how much noise our equipment was making (submarines live / die by sound levels transmitted into the water) and 2) we could predict some equipment maintenance like simple balance, pump-motor alignment, bearing problems.
Maybe that's what the OP is after. But as I said, we used a simple, two part epoxy with quite good results.
daestrom
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daestrom wrote:

The selection of a suitable adhesive depends on how much energy one can afford to lose in a sub-optimally coupled system. In your case, the signal level of vibrating mechanical equipment is probably high enough that some attenuation is tolerable.
The other thing to consider is the mass of the sensor, the flexibility of the adhesive and the resulting natural frequency of the sensor assembly. A massive sensor and/or flexible coupling will result in a lower frequency and result in attenuation of signals above that point.

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On Sat, 22 Mar 2008 20:12:13 -0800, "Paul Hovnanian P.E."

Metal filled epoxies pass thermal as well as vibration quite well.
http://www.epotek.com/SSCDocs/datasheets/H20E.PDF
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How does CA (cyanoacrylate) stack up against epoxy?
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CA has high "pulling" strength, but is easily cracked by lateral forces.
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The "flexible coupling" provided by the epoxies I've tried is causing issues.
It's been suggested that I try silver-filled epoxy and potting compound. Dental cement was also a suggestion. I'm looking at all of these.
FBt
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