DB-25 Panel cutout dimensions


Hi,
I must be losing my Google search skills but I cannot find panel cut
out details for a female DB-25 plug.
By Female I mean the outer profile of the shell and not the pins
versus sockets. The panel cutout has to be big enough to clear that
outer shell and let the plug seat fully with the Male part.
Can someone please point me at a website that will have the cutout
dimensions?
Thanks
Dave
Reply to
Dave, I can't do that
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I once saw a catalog listing for a Greenlee punch for such. The price would make you faint, however.
Reply to
David Lesher
Then you mean the male side (gender referring to the actual electrical interface connections, ie, the actual pins and sockets). On a DB-25, the outer shell of the male end will surround the outer shell of the female when the two are connected.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
I just emailed you a couple autocad dwgs that I use for mounting connectors in NEMA boxes. They're not dimensioned, but they may be helpful. I generally print them and transfer the center lines to the panel with a punch. Let me know if you don't receive or can't open them.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
Something top watch out for, if the metal piece is thick you may need to relieve/'face' the mounting area to get full seating.
Dave
Reply to
spamTHISbrp
Hi Ned,
Thanks I got them and replied.
Dave
Reply to
Dave, I can't do that
Hi Jon,
Thanks, I had not realized that.
So I need the cut out large enough for the Male (pins) version.
Dave
Reply to
Dave, I can't do that
I also remembered AMP has excellent drawings of their connectors, for example:
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I'm not sure if that's exactly what you need. I reached it thru Mouser's web site.
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Reply to
Ned Simmons
There's no real standard for a cutout- some are reversible and some are not, and some have looser tolerance than others.
There's a cutout (on a panel) drawing here, but you have to register and log in:
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(reversible)
Here's another (non-reversible)
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And a datasheet for a part with yet another design:
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And a cutout-only drawing:
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Lots and lots more info if you search electronics distributors for the part datasheets (eg. Digikey).
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
Can't you just measure the parallel port on your PC, or an old computer card? I used to use a spare plate from a bad board to scribe the outline, and a nibblet to make custom cutouts.
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shows a lot of connector cutouts.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Correct me if I am being really stupid, but why cant you measure it? - after all, this is what vernier calipers are made for. By all means if you have the data in front of you thats the easy way, but basic metalworking skills........
Andrew VK3BFA.
PS - ok, granted, I have learnt in a proper trade certificate course all the really basic metalworking stuff that most hobbyists do not bother with cause its "too basic" - a lot to be said for starting the book on page 1 line 1......
Reply to
vk3bfa
Go to the Digi-Key website
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, find a representative DB-25 connector, and pull up it's data sheet. If it's designed for panel mounting through a cutout, there should be cutout dimensions.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
Thanks to all who responded.
I had been to Mouser and checked some Data sheets but they only showed the body dimensions and not the cutouts.
Thanks for the links I will follow all of them up.
There has to be a standard for these. I cannot believe there are NEMA patterns for just about any type of motor and nothing for DB- connectors. Switch manufacturers all include panel cutouts. I sincerely doubt I am the first person to need cutout dimensions.
As to the two who suggested measuring, take a look at a DB-25 and notice the 10deg angle at the end. Care to hazard how to make an accurate drawing of that? I want accurate and not just near enough. Near enough may be good enough for you two, but not this little cookie.
Dave
Reply to
Dave, I can't do that
Perfect, thank you.
Dave
Reply to
Dave, I can't do that
Excellent, thanks Sphero.
Dave
Reply to
Dave, I can't do that
How many of the holes are you making? I have a punch set I got in the 1970's from the old "Black Box" company. Made many adapters for something, I don't remember now just what they were. If you have interest, email me off line. I certainly have not had a need for it in the last 20+ years!
Paul
Reply to
co_farmer
You're welcome.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Erh - whats the problem? - basic layout principles......I did a unit in this at school for precisely this sort of thing... You can measure the length and breadth, use a protractor to get the angles at each end, then use a radius gauge to get the curves...
And how many are you making? - if you are this fussy about a panel cutout, its going to take you a LONG time.....and thats assuming you can machine to the tolerances you seem to require...
Andrew VK3BFA.
Reply to
vk3bfa
I made a CAD drawing of one by measuring the radius of the corner and length of the long side and placing two circles at that distance. I moved the angled side guidelines to touch those circles, then placed two more corner circles tangent to the sides and a bottom guideline. Then I added clearance all around for the fillet between the body and the D part. Measure a sample from the manufacturer you plan to use because they aren't all identical to 0.001" and you have little room to spare between the angle and the mounting hole.
The commercial hand punches, which are difficult to use, cut oversize. I nearly destroyed one punching holes in 0.093" 6061 on a robot chassis. The flat and the guide pins aren't enough to hold the punch straight.
One of the many standard DB patterns is a square-ended hole matching the wire side, with a notch for the mounting screws. These allow you to put the connector outside the panel where the mounting standoffs extent the right distance. When the connector is inside they prevent the plug from fully mating. Be sure you can wiggle the wired connector through the hole and don't have to assemble it in place.
Jim Wilkins
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Thanks guys,
I am doing 6 but they are on the sides of an existing box so it is not flat sheet. I am using a CNC bed mill so using the right dimensions just makes good sense.
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I know I could reverse engineer one, but as I have stated, and now find to be true, there must be some drawings out there. And indeed there are.
Problem solved.
Dave
Reply to
Dave, I can't do that

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