For those who like to have "thumbnails" of videos



There is noone in the killfile (except Cliff) from here. They all have something interesting to say. If they are on-topic.

This will make some happy here. :-)) I let it drop and it got slighly bent. About 1/100 mm. Now have to scrap the belly out of it. :-) Anyhow, found a method for lowering complete regions without making too much new errors. I make a checkered pattern in one direction and then directly scrape the leftout boxes in the other direction.
Not happy with applying the blue to the granite surface. I get so indifferent readings. How do you do that?
Nick
--
The modular DRO
<http://www.yadro.de>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 24 Sep 2006 01:10:13 +0200, snipped-for-privacy@gmx.de (Nick Mller) wrote:

About the only one that I have is radioham (airy bean) in ukrme

Bugger! I bet that was an unhappy moment.

Better than chasing lots of little spots one at a time...

I use a soft (polyurethane rubber coated) roller to spread the blue. The roller was sold for pressing down the glued edges of wallpaper and is about 50mm long by 50mm diameter. I roll the roller backwards and forwards and from side to side and also hold the roller at 30-45 degrees from the angle of travel so that it skids sideways. This seems to spread the blue quite well. I stop when the granite looks about the same _through_ the blue over the whole area that I'm using.
Regards Mark Rand RTFM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't remember to have read him.

Learning process a bit stretched.

Got one yesterday night for a beer.

Will try today.
Thanks, Nick
--
The modular DRO
<http://www.yadro.de>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmx.de (Nick Mller) wrote:

This thread is trashed on my computer so I'm only seeing part of it. Are you painting the reference surface and transfering to the surface you are correcting, scraping off the spots will color?
Thanks,
Wes S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
??

Exactly (if "will" means "with" ;-) ). But there are three classes of colored spots. Takes some time to distinguish them. High spots Medium spots and low spots
Nick
--
The modular DRO
<http://www.yadro.de>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmx.de (Nick Mller) wrote:

Yes, you are correct. Nothing like having a German correct an Americans English. ;)

I take it that the low spots are the darkest ones?
Wes S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah, sorry! Typos are harder to understand for me than for native speakers. No nickpicking[tm] here.

No. High spots are very light in the middle and do have a dark(er) boundary. Middle spots are dark (like the boundary of the high spots) Low spots are light and the boundary fading out.
With some graphics it would be easy to explain why*). I'll make them when I write "the beginners scraping page". But only when my prism is finished. But now I'm a bit distracted with a new version for YADRO.
*) I have read the three types somewhere, but without explanation. It is easy not to remember and not to understand what you do, when there is no explanation for the why. I found out (I bet I'm _not_ the first and only one) that explanation and now can judge the spots better.
Nick
--
The modular DRO
<http://www.yadro.de>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 25 Sep 2006 23:25:27 +0200, snipped-for-privacy@gmx.de (Nick Mller) wrote:

There is an evil little trick that I worked out and use sometimes. After rubbing the object on the blued surface plate, rub it on a clean part of the surface plate. This will highlight the high spots very well. This is useful in the middle of the job when you are still using a fairly thick layer of blue on the surface plate but want to know where the worst areas are.
Mark Rand RTFM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks. Didn't come to rubbing on a clean part, but rubbing more. Your trick is great.
Anybody listening thinks we are experts?
Thanks, Nick
--
The modular DRO
<http://www.yadro.de>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 26 Sep 2006 00:40:21 +0200, snipped-for-privacy@gmx.de (Nick Mller) wrote:

It must be all bullshit. Otherwise we'd be good enough to get a job doing it :-)
Mark Rand RTFM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 26 Sep 2006 18:14:35 +0100, Mark Rand

=====================Many a truth is oft spake in jest....
More than likely the "hands on" people in this thread are fully qualified to get a job doing hand scraping, at least at the journeyman level.
Until I retired, I spent many years doing technology transfer, and industrial training in private industry, before getting into post secondary education full time.
Being a slow learner, I was concerned that I was doing something wrong in that the considerable amounts of time, effort and money the students, their employers [and later the tax payers], and I were investing in "training - training -- training" did not seem to produce the expected results, or indeed, *ANY* measurable results (although my "smile sheets," and "feel good" surveys were always highly positive).
While it seems stupidly simple, the reason for this continues to escape many people, probably because it is *HIGHLY* unpalatable...
First, the successful learner must have the necessary aptitude and talents. Like Grandma said "you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear." In many cases a particular set of talents, abilities, etc. are required in several fields, and the learners (or their parents), being rational, tend toward the more popular fields, which are generally the higher paying *AT THE TIME OF CAREER CHOICE*.
Second, the successful learner must have the facilities to develop their skills. This especially includes time, the required facilities, and to a somewhat lesser degree, a qualified instructor. The numbers of participants in both AMC and RCM that are essentially self-taught show that while a qualified instructor can be very helpful, and may speed up the learning process, it is by no means a requirement. However, the availability of time, materials and a place to practice is critical.
Third, and possibly most important, is a continuing and stable demand for the skill cluster [trade] the learners develop. It is a frequently overlooked fact that most people [and their families] like to eat every day, and will *NOT* seek employment in, or remain in, any trade, that does not support this habit.
One of the most pernicious concepts of industrial education was the concept of "skills banking" which assumed the individual would/could retain the competency/qualifications they developed *WITHOUT CONTINUAL PRACTICE.* Many of the "hands on" trades are fully as kinesthetic as playing golf, or possibly even piloting a plane, and the motto of "use it, or lose it" is applicable. In the case of scraping for alignment, flatness, etc. not only is finely/highly developed hand/eye coordination [how to scrape] a requirement, considerable numeric skills [how much to scrape], and spatial skills [where to scrape] are also required. Most people with these skills at the required levels have found better working conditions and far more remunerative employment in other fields such as engineering, product design, and CNC programming.
One of the major contributing factors in American industry is the exponential growth in "inhale-exhale" employment, where all employees including the CEO are temps, until the next chapter 11 filing.
Unka George (George McDuffee) ............................... So long as a man rides his Hobby-Horse peaceably and quietly along the King's highway, and neither compels you or me to get up behind him-pray, Sir, what have either you or I to do with it? Laurence Sterne (1713-68), English author. Tristram Shandy, bk. 1, ch. 7 (1759-67).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wait! Scrapers ask 800.- EUR a day. I'd be happy with just 500.- (for now).
A freelance scraper with his own set of tools and a good reputation will make big $$$$. Only thing missing is reputation. But we are working on it ...
Nick
--
The modular DRO
<http://www.yadro.de>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmx.de (Nick Mller) wrote:

I am looking forwards to seeing that when you put it up on www.
Wes S
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
also like to make short videos of things.

As a buyer, I hate videos or animations. They're distracting and, imho, cheap-looking. They bring to mind every Tripod site someone throws together with animated gifs and squiggles and fat neon green and pink text. I have broadband, so the download is not the problem; the problem is I, and thousands of other folks, am borderline ADD, and seeing things moving in my peripheral vision while I'm trying to concentrate on text makes comprehension impossible.
They're your auctions and of course you can do anything you like, but if you're looking for feedback, there's mine, fwiw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.