Possible reason the A-10 is being dropped

Good one. Martin
On 9/28/2015 5:38 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote:


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, September 28, 2015 at 6:38:53 PM UTC-4, Jim Wilkins wrote:

We? Who the hell are you talking about "we". Radar was invented by a Scot (Robert Alexander Watson-Watt). Honestly, I don't even know if he ever eve n visited the United States. Radar like research was going on in several c ountries. The US was not a pioneer in this area.

The budget devoted toward this field was still practically nothing relative ly speaking.

Cell phones and cars were practically nothing budgetary-wise. And weaponiz ed versions of this stuff? Practically nothing.

rk

A lot of it wasn't even pioneered in the USA. So maybe militaries of other nations had higher budgetary devotion, but certainly not here in the United States.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

We? Who the hell are you talking about "we". Radar was invented by a Scot (Robert Alexander Watson-Watt). Honestly, I don't even know if he ever even visited the United States. Radar like research was going on in several countries. The US was not a pioneer in this area.

The budget devoted toward this field was still practically nothing relatively speaking.

Cell phones and cars were practically nothing budgetary-wise. And weaponized versions of this stuff? Practically nothing.

A lot of it wasn't even pioneered in the USA. So maybe militaries of other nations had higher budgetary devotion, but certainly not here in the United States.
===========The Great War had ended all major wars, remember? We wouldn't be needing a military for more than minor police actions. Pacifists controlled Depression spending.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_radar Actually it was Watson Watt's assistant Arnold Wilkins who invented, built and demonstrated the first British radar in February of 1935.
The US Navy beat them, although since radar was kept top secret by all of its nearly simultaneous inventors it wasn't known to be a race.
"In December 1934, the apparatus was used to detect a plane at a distance of one mile (1.6 km) flying up and down the Potomac. Although the detection range was small and the indications on the oscilloscope monitor were almost indistinct, it demonstrated the basic concept of a pulsed radar system. Based on this, Page, Taylor, and Young are usually credited with building and demonstrating the world's first true radar."
The British system transmitted a continuous wave and inferred direction to the target by measuring the return's phase difference at two antennas, the same way our ears tell the direction but not distance of a sound source. A second receiver and antenna pair elsewhere gave an intersecting vector and crude estimate of range. The Germans investigated it and concluded it was something other than a radar, since it didn't work like theirs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tizard_Mission "...the British disclosed the technical details of the Chain Home early warning radar stations. The British thought the Americans did not have anything like this, but found it was virtually identical to the US Navy's longwave CXAM radar."
The British didn't invent computers all by themselves either.
At Mitre I had a working replica of a ~1932 German microwave aircraft detection radar on my desk. I haven't found any mention of it online.
US jet engine development began earlier than is generally known, too: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lockheed_J37 "Price started work on his own turbojet design in 1938,..."
-jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Radar hardware of one design and a good one was developed in the UK. Western Electric was assigned to take it and make Ship radar and then Air radar. The design team was in Bell Labs, my dad was on that team. He later went to Carolina to put it into production. He retired as a director of R&D in Field Engineering and had a heavy dotted line back to Bell Labs. He spent his last 6 months in the Labs completing his design documentation on his last monster Radar.
The US worked on radar at the same time, but didn't have a working model as clean as the UK. The UK design went to both Naval bodies of the UK and USA. It was critical for the shipping between the US and the UK. Later it was shown to be instrumental in many a battle in the Pacific.
The Magnetron tube that was provided was an R&D design by the UK. It put both of us ahead in shipboard radar to fight planes and subs.
Martin
On 9/30/2015 4:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The magnetron tube was an American invention: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Hull
The British contribution was to extend its frequency response into the microwave range. US experimental microwave radars of the late 1930's used Klystron tubes, which took longer to fully develop. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klystron
That article mentions that magnetrons had poor frequency stability. British electronic genius R. V. Jones wrote that they could classify unknown transmissions as British or German by observing their frequency stability. Typically German field gear was as good as the best British laboratory instruments. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
-jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What's missing is that Raytheon invented the manufacturing process that made it practical to make magnetrons by the tens of thousands. Without this, radar would have remained a lab curio.
.<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Percy_Spencer
Joe Gwinn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My dad used Klystrons you could unbolt a plate and climb inside (in a RAD suit) change the filament climb out and pump down. They were 6 meters tall. Short ones :-)
Magnetrons, a high tech type, was / is used on a B-52. It has some special features that isn't on the typical unit. About the size of a boot box. I taught Semiconductor Electronics to the B-52 Design team so they could design the F-111B. And they did. It was a bit weird to be teaching someone twice ones age solid state devices. Thankfully I knew tubes and related their place in the solid state designs. They took to design faster that way and we got into the mathematics as well. A long time ago.
Martin
On 10/1/2015 6:24 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
EMP bombs. Nasty. Destroys electronics.
Rail Guns. Basically a linear accelerator that shoots a projectile at a high rate, electrically driven by electronics.
Martin
On 9/28/2015 4:37 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can shoot the moon and get the reflection. It is all in the quality of signal beam. It is parallel light.
They were developed for subs to shoot out an optic and cut the waterline or hit the magazine. All sorts of tricky stuff.
These are not the simple ones you hold. These are large units.
I knew a guy working on them in a puff plane. That type. They used a 707 since they were cheap and could use newer engines for more power.
The coolant tank was baffled to prevent waves while flying. The baffles broke down and the plane was having problems with shifting center of gravity. Kinda dangerous.
Battle ships were fitted as well.
Martin
On 9/25/2015 8:40 AM, Ignoramus32266 wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, September 23, 2015 at 6:31:56 PM UTC-4, jonathan wrote:

th respect to technology, engineering and science. Having decades old habi ts and traditions don't always do it. Its always been like that. There's no such thing as "oldie, but goodie".

ote:

.
e.

ers-will-carry-laser-cannons-cyber-weapons-by-2020/

.
rom-carriers.html
Its about time. The technology has been around for years and years, like wi th green cars, aircraft and other transportstion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 25 Sep 2015 07:49:05 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

No, it hasn't. Fiber lasers of that capability (from IPG) just became available about four or five years ago, and weaponizing them into something that really works has only been possible for a couple of years.

I had a couple of green cars -- British Racing Green. d8-)
--
Ed Huntress

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, September 25, 2015 at 11:00:37 AM UTC-4, Ed Huntress wrote:

with respect to technology, engineering and science. Having decades old h abits and traditions don't always do it. Its always been like that. There 's no such thing as "oldie, but goodie".

wrote:

s...

one.

ls

ghters-will-carry-laser-cannons-cyber-weapons-by-2020/

s

e

,

t

t

r

e

r

on

al

,

u

e

e.

mpo.

s

ns

he

e

s-from-carriers.html

Yes it has. "The first laser was built in 1960 by Theodore H. Maiman at Hu ghes Laboratories" (wikipedia), this makes the technology at least that old .
If the military had placed the majority of its funding into that program ve rsus others, then the technology would be far more advanced by today.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 25 Sep 2015 08:38:24 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I built my first laser in 1965, with a synthetic ruby rod given to me by Dr. Herb Elion of Princeton University, who did pioneering laser research for the US Navy.
I research and write about lasers every month. The company that makes the laser weapon power sources for the US military, IPG Photonics, is one I'm in contact with every week. I know what they can do, and I know the specific laser power heads that the Navy and Air Force are using in their weapons. I'll be watching their newest ones at work in November.
These devices are made with diode-pumped lasers that have fiber amplifiers. They're good for around 10 kW each, and the weapon development comes from ganging them up and focusing them together. The Navy weapon is 30 kW. The next step is to get them up over 100 kW. They aren't there yet. And that will not be nearly enough to knock out an ICBM.
The recent developments have been with lasers that have a wavelength on the order of 1000 nm -- near inrared. Most high-powered lasers have wavelengths that are reflected by shiny or polished surfaces. The output of the fiber laser, currently the hot ticket in laser cutting machines for fabricators, is absorbed by shiny surfaces. That combination of power, compactness, and wavelength is what makes the laser weapons possible. This is all fairly new technology.

The technology comes from a transplanted Russian company that is now based in the US. The diodes that power these things are the product of US, Japanese, and Russian technology.
You do go off on speculative tangents, mog.
--
Ed Huntress

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.