Retired!

Well, I retired on Friday. 'Finally had enough. So I went fishing this weekend -- and I see that a lot of people here spent this nice weekend
blowing smoke at each other.
Tomorrow I'm leaving for a few days of .... more fishing. Then I'm going somewhere else. I won't be back for a long while.
So, enjoy yourselves. I'll be finding better ways to use my time. I have a small boat to build before it gets cold. Hasta luego!
(if anyone wants to reach me, delete the "3" from my phony email address above)
--
Ed Huntress

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On 9/12/2016 12:39 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

What kind of fishing? My son and I are thinking of getting into fly fishing. I'd like to look into building my own fly rod. Ever done that?
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wrote:

Trout fishing for the next few days, in PA. Then bluefish, in NJ. And, if they're biting, false albacore. I haven't checked to see if they're in. They are the ultimate fly-fishing trip, to me.
I'vs been fly fishing since I was 7. Yes, I build fly rods and other rods. That's most of what I do with my South Bend lathe these days. But you don't need a lathe unless you're a real scratch-builder.
Send me a note to my real email address (the one above, but without the "3") and I'll send you a few photos of my favorite home-built fly rod, which I built from scratch around 10 years ago.
I'll be out of here after tonight, though, for at least a week.
--
Ed Huntress

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I will be stalking salmon in Oregon on the Wilson in November.
Congratulations on retirement.
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On Fri, 16 Sep 2016 10:39:02 +0200 (CEST), "lurker #22"

Ah, that's one I hope to try some day -- or Atlantic salmon in the Canadian Maritimes.
But that may be dreaming. Late today, I'm going after bluefish on the NJ beaches.

Thanks, lurker.
--
Ed Huntress

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The most hard corp fly angler I know has got to be John Lindsey. He has an IGFA world record or two under his belt as well (line class). He wrote a nice book on chasing big bass on the fly recently. I've read about half of it and its pretty entertaining. Might be a good guy to chat with if you are serious about getting into the whole fly fishing lifestyle. He posts on Tackle Underground and on my fishing site (www.yumabassman.com) as bassrecord. If you just want to read a good book he self published it and sells them here. http://www.bigbassflyfishing.com/
And now back to metal working. I am making brass adaptors from some generic Chinese thread to NPT threads today. The Chinese thread just seems like a sloppy M6-1. Weird. They didn't leak though. I'm making them with clamped o-ring seals wherever my stuff comes together. One of my new machines is not oiling the Z axis ball nut, so I am plugging the hole where the line comes out of the Z carriage assembly and routing a line directly from the oil distribution manifold. So far I have only had to make two adaptors and a plug.
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On Monday, September 12, 2016 at 5:18:08 PM UTC-4, Rudy Canoza wrote:

I bought a book on making fishing rods by Dale Clemens and gave it to my gr andson last Christmas. But he is not much of a DIY kid. Fortunately the b ook was from Abe and cost less than $5. I recommend the book. I learned a bout Dale from a guy that was the production manager for Fenwick at the tim e.
Dan
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On Mon, 12 Sep 2016 17:30:10 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@krl.org"

I have three of Clemens' books, and four flyrods I built on Clemens blanks. He's very good, but much more than you need to build your first rod. You can get plenty of info online.
--
Ed Huntress

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    Congratulations on retiring.

    [ ... ]

    A friend, who recently retired also, and moved to somewhere in Michigan (if I remember right) makes fly rods from bamboo, and even took the time to design and build a CNC machine for cutting the taper of the sections from split bamboo. Apparently, people pay him quite a bit for the rods, so they must be pretty good.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
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wrote:

Well, a Carmichael bamboo rod brings something like $3,000 or more, so there is some money in it. But building rods in bamboo is like making guitars, if not violins. The level of craft is on a similar order.
--
Ed Huntress

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On 9/13/2016 3:27 AM, Ed Huntress wrote:

Maybe I'll aim a little lower to start ;-)
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wrote:

I'll make a few suggestions here, because you can get really deep into the weeds in a hurry when it comes to fly rods and fly fishing.
It's like golf clubs or shotguns: you can spend unbelievable amounts of money on it, but their performance and pleasure you'll get from it have no relationship to how expensive your equipment is. And if you build rods and find out that you don't really like it, it's a waste. Ovis makes fly-fishing outfits that start at $170, and they have some that go up into the thousands. Until you've been at it for a year or two, you wouldn't recognize the difference.
If you want to try it, my suggestion to everyone (except my wife <g>) is to attend a fly-casting school and see what you think of it. I love it but not everyone does. You have an excellent one in Calif. -- Bill Ward's -- and there are many other smaller, lesser-known ones that would be just as good for a first try. Try their rods and talk to them about what you'd do with it. There are many different kinds and weights, and starting off with the wrong one for the kind of fishing you'd do would be very frustrating.
BTW, there are lots of videos that will help after you get a little hands-on instruction, but they won't help you with the feel and the timing, which are almost everything. Until the last few days I hadn't fly-fished since a year ago this past Spring, and I got really rusty. I'm still not back up to speed. If you only do it from time to time, it probably won't go well. You have to do it fairly frequently. When I can't get trout fishing I'll fly-fish for sunfish or bass. Salt water is another story entirely.
Building rods is fun, but it won't save you any money. My rods probably contain an average of $300 worth of materials each. I could buy really nice rods for that. My newest reel cost a couple of hundred. My $39 one works just as well.
But two of my rods are very special -- you can't buy anything like them, or you couldn't, unless you had them custom-made. That kind of specialization, though, is for someone who has been at it for years.
If you go to a school and find that you really like it, you're probably better off buying a decent but inexpensive rod, rather than building one to start. It takes a few weeks of spare time to do it right at home but the factories can build them in less than an hour. After you've been at it and decide what contour you want, what grip, and what weight, you can buy components a lot more intelligently. I like to make my grips, hosels, and so on from scratch. Without a lathe, you'd want to buy them already made. All you need for equipment is a big book to put some drag on the winding thread, a couple of wire coat hangers, some sandpaper, and a couple of razor blades. But take your time.
Good luck.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Thu, 15 Sep 2016 12:16:34 -0400, Ed Huntress wrote:

I always said this about skiing equipment (where I actually know what I'm doing) and tennis rackets (where I don't): if you suck, the equipment doesn't matter, and if you're very good, it doesn't matter either.
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On Sat, 1 Oct 2016 03:33:46 -0000 (UTC), Przemek Klosowski

--
Good ideas alter the power balance in relationships, that is why
good ideas are always initially resisted. Good ideas come with a
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    OTOH, if you know what you are doing, you know _why_ this thing isn't working.
-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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On Sat, 01 Oct 2016 07:15:39 -0700, pyotr filipivich

That's what I've always aimed for. The more you know about something, the more likely it is that you know how it works and can fix it, fake it, or just say 'fuck it' as necessary.
--
Good ideas alter the power balance in relationships, that is why
good ideas are always initially resisted. Good ideas come with a
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On Sat, 1 Oct 2016 03:33:46 -0000 (UTC), Przemek Klosowski

Ha-ha! Yes, that's a good point. It certainly applies to fly-fishing equipment, too.
In fact it's something has happened to many hobbies and passtimes. The amount of money you can spend on them today, if you're inclined that way, is amazing. But it doesn't make much difference in how much fun you have, in my experience.
--
Ed Huntress

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On Sat, 1 Oct 2016 03:33:46 -0000 (UTC), Przemek Klosowski

That's what I try to tell my offspring when they tell my I need better machines, i.e. grinder made from a double shaft 1/4 HP motor 50+ years ago or 1/6 HP 3/8" bench top drill press upgraded with a 1/3 HP motor, 1/2" chuck and a 66" column w/ CI base on casters.
--

Gerry :-)}
London,Canada
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Ed Huntress wrote:

Retirement sounds like a wonderful concept, hopefully some day I, too, will get to experience it! Enjoy!!!
Jon
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wrote:

Thanks, Jon. Actually, I'll probably start writing again in a few weeks. I don't like the looks of what happens to my friends when they retire.
I'm just not going to work on somebody else's schedule again.
--
Ed Huntress

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