Rifling machine plans

on Fri, 25 Oct 2019 12:54:34


Life is a waterfall.
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On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 09:53:34 -0800, pyotr filipivich

I think it is because they embraced change (then found out it gave them power and made tons of money, too.) It probably had something to do with concentration of like-minded people, too.
--
There is nothing more frightening than ignorance in action.

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wrote:

Especially these two, and later their apprentices: https://www.britannica.com/biography/Joseph-Bramah
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wrote:

I brought up the subject of what enables or hinders progress because we are in a golden age right now, and an envious element who hasn't learned how to participate constructively and politicians who seek a larger power base of Miserati whom they can falsely promise to help by punitively taxing success are trying to destroy it. https://www.businessinsider.com/were-living-in-a-golden-age-and-its-scaring-the-hell-out-of-everybody-2018-1 "We're in a Golden Age, but can only see darkness ahead." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-fulfilling_prophecy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schadenfreude
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On Sun, 17 Nov 2019 10:19:45 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Cool.
--
There is nothing more frightening than ignorance in action.

--Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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wrote:

The USA had comparably talented inventors but they didn't work together. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Oliver-Evans https://www.britannica.com/biography/Simeon-North https://www.britannica.com/biography/Henry-Miller-Shreve https://www.britannica.com/biography/John-Fitch
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On Mon, 18 Nov 2019 00:00:18 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Wow, so much loss for these poor guys! Then fame for Fulton rather than Fitch. That sucks. But we did have some very talented people in the USA.
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There is nothing more frightening than ignorance in action.

--Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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21:37:54 -0800 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    History is full of guy A inventing / discovering something "first" but guy B is the one who got the publicity. E.G., it is called "America" because the map maker called it after Americo Vespucci, for various reasons.
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pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
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on Sat, 23 Nov 2019

It's often A, B, C and D tinkering with the idea, then E making it practical after a different advance removes the last stumbling block. Steam transportation required stronger boilers, airplanes needed lightweight engines.
In my own experience the Segway required solid-state gyros, and cell phones required A/D converters fast enough to digitize radio frequencies. I was building prototypes with digital storage scope components.
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-0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    As I understand it. one of the critical features of steam engines (smooth round cylinders which allowed a tight fit) came as a result of development in the armaments trade: the ability to bore out cannon barrels.     And so forth.

    Although I have plans for a steam powered aeroplane. (circa 1908 iirc)

    I recall reading an article of a guy who made a processor using individual transistors soldered to circuit boards.
    There is a lot of "retro-" building where people are doing "by hand" as a hobby what is not practical to do commercially. I make wooden boxes, the wife crochets blankets. Nobody is going to pay for our time, the best we can hope for is to cover materials. "It is a hobby."

--
pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
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On Mon, 25 Nov 2019 09:04:53 -0800
<snip>

Have you seen these puzzle boxes:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_puzzle_box
I have one like the first image an old acquaintance brought back from Japan after spending some time there. Very cool and they sell for a decent price.
Relative crocheted custom table clothes when she was younger. They used sell for quite a bit. One in particular was $600 in the mid 1970's. I think they "earned" every bit of it though :)
I'm guilty of repairing many items though that would never be profitable to do for pay...
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Grand Rapids MI
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    IF you have the skill, sure. My skills aren't _that_ good.

    I've bought boxes, cabinets, and the like on the grounds "The hardware is more than they're asking for the whole thing!"
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pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
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The Army taught me computer electronics at that RTL and DTL level in 1970. Flip-flops used tricky level shifting and diode steering to direct a capacitive clock pulse to turn off the base of the On transistor. Luckily I had learned DC and AC network analysis in college Physics classes. Later I got into the design of custom ICs, beginning with a DRAM controller for the digital signal processor in a color scanner. When I started as a lab tech at Unitrode my training assignment was to dissect an IC layer by layer with nitric acid and draw the schematic. I got all the current mirrors, gates, op amps and comparators right but couldn't decipher the innards of the voltage reference circuit.
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On Mon, 25 Nov 2019 09:04:53 -0800, pyotr filipivich

Quilters used to give away their hard work, too, but they found a marketing scheme which now sees quilts go for hundreds of dollars. Find your marketer, dude.
--
There is nothing more frightening than ignorance in action.

--Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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20:56:15 -0800 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    It is a possibility. BUT ... I went to tech school to learn machining, because woodworking was a hobby/relaxation. However, as I've said, "I hired this company to collect my pay from customers, oh, and to find customers, suppliers, and to handle the paperwork side of the business."

--
pyotr filipivich
"With Age comes Wisdom. Although far too often, Age travels alone."
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wrote:

"The system was satisfactory for tram engines (which were very low-powered) but would not have worked for larger railway locomotives."
http://cs.trains.com/trn/f/740/t/209944.aspx?sort=ASC&pi332=2 "South African Railways was famous for its condensing 4-8-4's, which were built to support steam operation through a desert where water was unavailable. The condensing gear, which was mounted in the tender, had its own maintenance needs above and beyond that of the rest of the locomotive. SAR also had otherwise identical conventional 4-8-4's for service elsewhere, which implies that the condensing gear existed only for a special situation."
Their disadvantages were tolerated when necessary to solve more serious problems. Somewhere I read that their maintenance was quite high, due partly to cracking from hammer blow. Your small loading gauge severely restricted what could be hung on the outside in the air flow.
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Here's a fine example of the protracted development of a promising but difficult idea into a practical product:: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/60794/60794-h/60794-h.htm "The reader has doubtless sensed a certain monotony in this review of
them that were able to write at all."
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What did you think of the CoCo?
I was very impressed with the 6809's powerful instruction set, after struggling to turn a homebrew wire-wrapped 8080 machine into something resembling the IBM PC. The 8080 lacks relative jumps and is more suited to embedded control than general purpose computing with loadable programs. It provided good training in computer hardware design, though.
The company was right at the leading edge of high speed memory chip testing so I learned a lot about transmission lines and impedance matching that helped greatly with digital radio design later at Mitre. The memory testers were so fast that there would be three test vectors (address & write data) travelling out within the coax between the machine cabinet and the test head at the wafer prober, and three results coming back. We manually trimmed the cable lengths to match their propagation delays within a few picoseconds, 16ths of an inch at the speed of light. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wafer_testing
The CoCo had an elegantly simple video controller that I borrowed, in monochrome form, after giving up on Don Lancaster's Cheap Video.
Although I didn't use the 6809, studying it helped a lot when I had to design a 16-bit A/D converter board to go in a 68000-based NuBus Macintosh and the Apple Certified Programmer assigned to write its driver quit.
I could program UVPROMs on the Automatic Test Equipment we were building at work, I wrote a routine to do it quickly for practice, but the engineers gave me slow, pre-production samples of 2816 flash memory that's pin-compatible with the 2716 UV PROM, and the 6116 CMOS static RAM I was using. http://cva.stanford.edu/classes/cs99s/datasheets/at28c16.pdf
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    Or you sure that wasn't OS-9? The one by Microware which made the MC-6809 into a multi-user multi-tasking system (if you has additional serial ports.)
    I used it (along with DOS-69 on a SWTP 6809 system, after using the MC-6800 on both an Altair 680b and a SWTP 6800. The latter made it easier to wire-wrap custom interfaces -- and mechanically/electrically compatible with the SWTP 6809).
    I preferred OS-9, once I had it, but started with SSB'sj DOS-68 and DOS-69 for the 6809 system.

    They got a lot out of very little hardware. But the bit-banger serial interface was terrible -- toss in some MC-6850 serial port chips and it got a lot more usable for multi-user operation.

    the MC-6800 was pretty good already, but Motorola did the right thing with the MC-6809, tossing away backward compatibility -- though they made an assembler which could convert MC-6800 code to MC-6809 code, as long as you stayed clear of things playing with analyzing the stack, as the monitor (EP)ROM did. They (SSB) had a really nice later monitor EPROM -- while the SWTP 6800 used Motorola's MIKBUG as the monitor ROM, and tricky addressing for the early SSB floppy controller card EPROMs to allow it to be interleaved with the I/O address space.

    That controller was another custom Motorola chip, IIRC.

    I did a lot of assembly language work with the 6800 and 6809. Very little with the 68000, where most of my examples were Sun workstations and servers, with good C compilers. The first system was a COSMOS CMS-16/UNX with v7 unix and a terrible C compiler. Later system were the AT&T Unix-PC/7300/3B1 using the MC-68010 CPU, and the later Suns (before SPARC came into the game) were mostly the MC-68020, and one or two examples of the MC-68030, which I never had.

    I built a wire-wrapped computer at work using a MC-68B00 and a superset of the SSB monitor ROM. I did the assembly using a Tektronix MDL -- but at first I programmed the EPROMs with a suitcase-mounted manual prom burner (I forget the maker at the moment) until I wire-wrapped a burner for the 2716 to live in the system and expanded the monitor to include burn instructions. I could assemble the code in the MDL, and through a probe which plugged in where the CPU normally lived, I could load the program into a block of memory and then burn the EPROM on that with the MDL acting as the CPU, then switch back to the normal CPU and continue to use it without the help of the MDL.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    I recall reading about using paper or similar thin shims. But the wedge with fine thread might work too.

    For real fun, work out how to do a "progressive twist" - where the rifling twist gets higher the further down the barrel the bullet goes.
--
pyotr filipivich
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