Source for window sealant

I had to remove a broken aluminum window from one of my garage walk doors.
I found I could gently pry the frame out of the opening with just a thin
putty knife, but when I got it out, I found something that surprised me.
The sealant the manufacturer used had the properties of both a silicone sealant, and a non-hardening, clear "goo" -- the gooey part acted like a conventional putty, but the hardening part acted just like regular silicone sealant.
The bead appeared to have been gunned onto the door, then allowed to cure completely before screwing the frame onto the caulk. The "silicone" part was just as strongly adhered to the door skin as you'd suspect regular silicone would be (although it was a bit softer and more elastic that GE Silicone), but the gummy part only adhered to the window frame by its tackiness. It was a perfect sealant, in that it compressed fairly easily, sealed well, but allowed the window to be removed easily for repairs.
There was broken glass embedded in the sealant bead, and the bead had been cut in a couple of places where the glass edges got it, so I scraped it off the door.
I can use regular non-hardening "ribbon caulk" to re-do this, but I'm fascinated by the sealant they used.
Has anyone here worked in a window or door manufactury and is familiar with this stuff. I'd love to use it on future jobs, if I can find a source. The manufacturer of the door is no help -- must be a "trade secret".
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Urethane window adhesive. Same stuff that is used to glue in auto glass.
The outer "shell" will harden up and be sort of like silicone (flexible, no tacky feel) while the inner core will not fully cure and stays semi liquid.
http://www.autobodytoolmart.com/3m-fast-cure-auto-glass-urethane-08690-p-11379.aspx
--
Steve W.

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glass.
(flexible,

No, just the opposite here. I've used urethane windshield sealer.
This stuff was "hard" in the core, and gummy on the surface, except right where it was gunned on. Not just soft on the surface, but really aggressively sticky, and the stuff would come off on your fingers. Yet, the bead adhered strongly to the surface on which it was originally applied.
This stuff is really "backwards" from any other sealant I've seen. ALL the others skin over and either cure solid, or remain soft at the core. This stuff is hard at the core and soft on the outside.
This is also milky-clear, just like regular silicone sealant.
LLoyd
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Lexel, ma
On Tuesday, July 24, 2012 6:37:04 AM UTC-6, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Lexel, maybe? Ace carries that, $11-12/tube. Only clear sealant I know that really sticks and stays rubbery. Silicone isn't as clear.
Stan
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snipped-for-privacy@prolynx.com fired this volley in

No... I've used the acrylic/styrene solvent-based sealants, also. They are tough and rubbery. They do NOT stay "wet" and gummy on the air- exposed surface. They skin over quickly, self-level well, and are great sealants.
But you'd NEVER get a window back out of a steel door if you glued the whole flange to the door with that stuff.
This sealant was cured on the door, still "wet" on the window side, and very, very soft, so it complied almost like regular caulk when the window was screwed together.
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

Does the door have a label with the company name that you could use to locate the OEM?
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The company desk "didn't know anything about the caulk..." That's the "Florida Salute" -- _I_ don't know!
LLoyd
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" wrote:

As translated from the orignal German, "I KNOW NOTHINK!!!" :(
Did you ask them to ask production? Tell them you need the MSDS, so you don't have to ask the EPA to get the information to safely dispose of the materials without paying hazmat fees. ;-)
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message

May be they just brush on something that inhibits the cure of the sealant. There are a lot of things that do this to silicone. Maybe it was not even intentional?
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That's a good point. It only takes about five minutes to remove and clean up one of those windows (when it isn't broken). I have two such doors. I'll check the other one, too.
LLoyd
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On 07/24/2012 05:07 PM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Call me naive, but I couldn't help but think that maybe they just had a bad batch of sealant, like the problems that plagued GE Si II for awhile (kept it from curing fully).
Jon
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On Jul 24, 7:37am, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

Maybe this product: http://www.novagard.com/swat/swat.html
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On Jul 24, 8:37am, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

A related question that's been on my mind for years, and since I'm just getting retty to refurb 20 windows in my house...
Is there something better than old-fashioned glazing putty to seal glass in wood sashes? I was thinking that maybe RTV silicone would do better and last longer.
Any thoughts?
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If you're still using the old oil and whiting putty, then yes. I've used DAP for years. Usually lasts until the glass is replaced. Key thing is that the glass has to be CLEAN, no fingerprints, no oil, no paint, where the putty is supposed to stick to it. Same thing with the frame, old putty has to be scraped off down to bare wood. Then a coat of paint over the top keeps it good for 20 years or so. I did the 25 windows(plus storms) the folks had during a college break one year, lasted until they replaced them with vinyl 30 years later. A clean and polished putty knife helps, too. Flexible for application, sharp and rigid for chipping out the old stuff.
Stan
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The common wisdom is to use siliconized acrylic caulk.
You cannot paint RTV silicones, nor paint any surface to which they've been previously applied unless you sand down to bare wood again.
The siliconized acrylics are paintable, last well, and are strong (once thoroughly dry. They shrink somewhat more than glazing putty, and are a bit more difficult to remove in the future, but work quite well.
--

On the comment about failed silicone -- yes, that might be it. I wish I
knew how to cause it to fail in just that way (if that's the case),
  Click to see the full signature.
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"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote in message
(snip)

I think different types of silicone are sensitive to different things, but the usual culprits are sulphur compounds, oils, and amine compounds. you could experiment with some things.
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Consider using double back tape to hold the glass in place while the sealant sets up.
Dan
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DAN! Have you never used glazier's points? That's what they're for!
Lloyd
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On Jul 25, 2:06pm, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote: .

Have you ever used double back tape? You just press the window in place.
Dan
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And then it doesn't sit in against the frame where it should, leaving an ugly gap on the inside surface that must also be caulked.
Glazier's points are cheaper, too.
I use lots of double-stick in the shop, including a very aggressive, thin tape for mounting work on the mill that cannot be clamped -- but never for anything that must fit tight to its mating surface.
LLoyd
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