Using JB Weld on a chair?

Greetings and salutations

After a dozen years or so, my desk chair has become hazardous. I didn't know you could crack an eighth inch steel plate, just by sitting on it. But - I managed, somehow. This is the plate which mounts the connector from the stand up to the chair bottom. Mostly it got the left-right stresses as I shift around reach for stuff, but I knew there was a problem when I leaned forward, and it "leaned" with me.

So, JB Weld. Advertised as being "able to fix anything but a broken heart", how it is for handling the sort of stresses of a twisting plate?

And how does it handle stress fractures and failure?

tschus pyotr

It is either JB weld or I find someone with a welding kit. Or go hit the yard sales, etc.

-- pyotr filipivich. Discussing the decline in the US's tech edge, James Niccol once wrote "It used to be that the USA was pretty good at producing stuff teenaged boys could lose a finger or two playing with."

Reply to
pyotr filipivich
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You might have a chance if you use the J.B. Weld to glue another plate to the existing one. But I would probably use some bolts.

Dan

Reply to
dcaster

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"Strength 3960 PSI"

Steel varies, 50,000 PSI is a good SWAG.

I'd use this to justify buying a 120V MIG welder and taking a night class in how to weld, mostly to learn how to recognize and correct mistakes since they aren't hard to use, but controlling molten metal takes practice whether it's steel or solder. Mine repays its cost with every rust hole repair on my vehicles.

-jsw, sitting in an office chair modified into a recliner.

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

Depending on the crack....

Drill a small hole to prevent the crack propagating further.

Drill a hole or 3 along the crack and put a 1/4" gutter bolt with a washer either side in the holes. Might stop it flexing.

Reply to
Kennedy

Weld it or toss it , JB ain't gonna hold . I had a chair like yours , the plate at the top of the gas tube cracked in half - in fact that's why the chair was tossed . Welded it a total of 3 times before other parts gave up , but I still have the black leather it was covered with . Might need it some day !

Reply to
Terry Coombs

If you cracked an 1/8" steel plate, JB weld isn't going to do much better. I would either fab up a replacement plate (if it is simple enough), or weld it back together. 1/8" is in the range that you can stick weld, and you can find used stick welders pretty cheap. When you're done, you can deduct the cost of a new chair from the cost of the stick welder for even more savings.

Jon

Reply to
Jon Danniken

You beat me to it. Any stress that cracks steel plate will demolish a glue joint. I like JB Weld and use it a lot, but I would not consider it for this.

Michael Koblic, Campbell River, BC

Reply to
mkoblic

JB weld seems to have a tensile strength of about 4,000 PSI. Mild steel has a tensile strength of 52,000 psi and a yield strength of about 44,000 psi, depending on temper.

Reply to
John B.

I wouldn't trust it in that application.

Geeze, Pete. It's steel, WELD IT! Take a 12-pack over to any welding shop at 4:45pm and the guys will fight to take the job. Piece of cake/duck soup.

Reply to
Larry Jaques

It'll do the job - for 10 minutes, or a week.

Reply to
clare

I hace a cracked pintle hitch, should I repair it with JB weld?

i
Reply to
Ignoramus32163

"Ignoramus32163" wrote in message news:Da6dnYe_abF3wgfOnZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com...

Did you run out of duct tape?

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

Duct tape did not help, I need something stronger, JB weld is on my next-to-try list.

i
Reply to
Ignoramus32163

That or superglue, eh?

Reply to
Larry Jaques

Try it on the toilet seat

Reply to
Ignoramus32163

Gunner Asch on Thu, 12 Jun 2014 05:30:48 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

A couple, but I have half the one guy's kit in my shed (the rest is "in storage").

-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."

Reply to
pyotr filipivich

"Terry Coombs" on Thu, 12 Jun 2014 07:33:42 -0500 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

Good point. I figure that if I toss it, I'll probably salvage the seat. The cat likes it, anyway.

-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."

Reply to
pyotr filipivich

Larry Jaques on Thu, 12 Jun 2014

18:11:10 -0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

Does the quality of the beer have any bearing on the quality of the weld?

Crap, if this had happened last month, I'd have taken it to the weld shop on campus and had one of the students get some practice.

(Did that years ago in tech school when the saw blade "skewed" and I needed the kerf refilled - in Aluminum.)

-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."

Reply to
pyotr filipivich

John B. on Fri, 13 Jun 2014 06:33:18 +0700 typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

Soooo - JB Weld if I want to hold it together until the end of the month. Otherwise, not really worth the effort.

-- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."

Reply to
pyotr filipivich

Just pile up the glue 11 times thicker.

-?

Reply to
Jim Wilkins

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