Salvaging Components---Where Do YOU Get Them?



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table and

ballscrews, etc, at

Where did the Hospital surplus stuff come from ? A dumpster ? Formal sale ? Thanks !
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There is usually one salvage company in any area that handles hospital salvage. A friend had that affiliation with most of the local ones. They would call and he would haul. Anything. He and his help removed X-ray machines to cabinets, beds and chairs. He would usually pay them a few bucks based on minimal salvage value minus labor. Contact one of your local hospitals and talk to the plant management or controller offices. Respectfully, Ron Moore

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hospital
ones. They

X-ray
a few

your local

Thanks !
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In regards to hospital salvage, you may find this interesting....
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060730/ap_on_he_me/recycling_medical_devices&printer=1 ;_ylt=Ahq3_8HeqpJkEmujq4LvIzVa24cA;_ylu=X3oDMTA3MXN1bHE0BHNlYwN0bWE-
Recycling medical devices raises concerns By LINDA A. JOHNSON, AP Business Writer
For eight months during his infancy, Sean Van Duyn gagged, retched and vomited daily. Now 6, the Winter Haven, Fla., boy still can't eat or drink by mouth, instead being fed by a permanent tube in his belly.
Beset by multiple medical problems in his first months, the boy had to have a breathing tube inserted through a hole cut in his neck. The gagging began and continued until his mother, Susan, discovered the tube was misshaped at the end and had been poking the back of his throat the whole time. The tube was replaced, but by then Sean's developing brain was programmed not to swallow; he still cannot.
The family alleged the injury occurred because the plastic breathing tube's tip had been bent during "reprocessing" - cleaning and heat sterilization - done at an Orlando hospital even though the tube was labeled for single use only. They won a confidential settlement from the hospital.
The case has fueled the debate over the safety of reusing surgical blades, forceps and other medical devices. The practice was routine until a couple decades ago, when stronger plastics enabled manufacturers to start making devices designed for single use to cut costs and prevent infection spread in the era of AIDS.
Then hospitals, and eventually specialized companies, started "reprocessing" single-use devices, cutting device costs by about half - without patients' knowledge.
Federal regulators say reprocessing is safe, but original device manufacturers say they can't guarantee recycled products will work correctly - and that they are wrongly blamed for malfunctions and patient harm caused by reprocessing.
A federal law taking effect Tuesday, requiring reprocessors to put their company name on recycled devices as well as the packaging, could help determine who's at fault when problems occur. For devices too small to mark, detachable stickers could be transferred to the patient's chart.
"That's like a 'Sue Me!' sticker," and may not be used much, said Josephine Torrente, a lawyer and biomedical engineer who consults for device manufacturers.
Dan Vukelich, executive director of the Association of Medical Device Reprocessors, argues reprocessed products are totally safe because each item is inspected before being shipped.
The device makers and their trade group have been lobbying legislators in several states for bills that protect their interests - and patients. The battle has a big - and fast-growing - financial stake for both sides. Device makers saw combined revenues jump from $48 billion in 2001 to $71 billion last year; reprocessors went from a combined $20 million in 2000 to $87 million in 2004.
Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Ethicon Endo-Surgery is suing the biggest reprocessor, Ascent Healthcare Solutions, for trademark infringement over reprocessing its single-use devices.
"It is impossible to reuse them," said Robert O'Holla, J&J's head of regulatory affairs for medical devices, because they are not designed to be taken apart for cleaning. Yet J&J gets complaints from customers about problems with devices showing excessive wear or bleach on them - signs of reprocessing.
Ascent Healthcare's regulatory chief, Don Selvey, said only about 2 percent of medical devices - a category that ranges from MRI machines to reading glasses - are now reprocessed. He said his company's processes reduce chances of "viable organisms" surviving on devices to one in one million.
Reprocessed devices are soaked in sterilizing solutions, disassembled, blasted clean with a fine powder, reassembled and inspected, then packaged, sterilized and resealed. On average, they're reused three to six times.
"It is as safe and effective as a new device if they meet our requirements," said Larry Spears, compliance chief for medical devices at the Food and Drug Administration.
Since early 2004, when reports of problems with medical devices were first required to note if they had been reprocessed, the FDA has received 13 reports of patient deaths and 421 other trouble reports, including 130 involving serious patient harm, although some may be duplicate reports.
Reprocessors say they must meet stringent FDA standards after first proving they can safely clean and sterilize each type of device. But the manufacturers main trade group, the Advanced Medical Technology Association, notes about half of the reprocessors' applications for reprocessing of individual devices were rejected by FDA, a sign of the difficulty of properly cleaning complex devices.
Rep. Tom Davis, a Virginia Republican who chairs the House Government Reform Committee, said Friday he plans a fall committee hearing to examine the issue.
"It is unclear to us at this time whether FDA is able to accurately track how often something goes wrong because a device meant to be used once was instead reused," Davis wrote in a statement.
Congress also has asked its investigative arm, the Government Accountability Office, to update a June 2000 report which concluded more oversight is needed. GAO is unsure when it will begin investigating.
Ken Hanover, CEO of the seven-hospital Health Alliance of Greater Cincinnati, said his hospitals have used reprocessed devices for about eight years without a problem.
"There's far more risk of medication errors in a hospital than of a problem arising with a reprocessed device," he said, adding that his hospitals "probably" would honor patient requests to have only new devices used on them.
Children's National Medical Center in Washington, on the other hand, doesn't use reprocessed devices, said surgeon in chief Dr. Kurt Newman.
"We want to use the safest and most sterile equipment," he said.
University of Pennsylvania bioethicist Arthur Caplan has "qualms" about the practice, particularly because patients don't give informed consent - required when deviating from the standard of care raises safety or efficacy concerns.
"I just think people ought to know what's going on," Caplan said.
Susan Van Duyn, Sean's mother, agreed.
"If anybody can learn from the tragedies with Sean, it's worth telling" his story, she said.
___
On the Net:
Advanced Medical Technology Association: http://www.advamed.org
Association of Medical Device Reprocessors: http://www.amdr.org
pogo wrote:

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I'm in Oklahoma City. Our "home" is a 3/4 mile trip to the largest surplus location. I think my wife failed to consider that when we bought this building. Respectfully, Ron Moore http://members.cox.net/mlogical We haven't updated it in a while.

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largest surplus

this
I just took a look at your website ... Man - what do you do ?!?!?
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We have a computer business, or it's had us, for over 20 years. That's what the office area is. My wife is a fiber artist as I'm sure you saw on the site. The machinery started as support for some gun stuff I do but kind of got a life of its own. And then, stuff just comes along, sometimes and I have difficulty saying no to a deal or free stuff with practical value. I've got to reevaluate that, at some point or get really busy on eBay. Respectfully, Ron Moore

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Living in a warehouse surrounded by "GOOD stuff"....sounds like heaven on Earth for those of us who love to build "stuff". ;<)
TMT
Ron Moore wrote:

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On Fri, 28 Jul 2006 12:05:51 -0700, Too_Many_Tools wrote:

There are some thrift stores where I live that sell used computers for between $5 and $15. They range from 486's to Pentium III's, as well as old Mac's. Most of these machines work, but I don't need old computers, so I buy some for salvage parts. In a couple of lucky cases, I've been able to use some of the parts to repair broken music synthesizers. They also get millions of power supplies, cables, and such junk there. I once picked up a pretty nice bench power supply for a few dollars, and I got an oscilloscope too once, some scientific calculators, etc.
And here's a sort of negative answer ... When I was a teenager I had a string a terrible, frustrating jobs. One of them was doing inventory in a warehouse for electronic and mechanical parts. There were thousands of neat little parts in this place and my job was to keep counting them. I also had to pull the parts that were discontinued. So one day I'd pulled a whole bunch of these nifty little things -- motors, LEDs, connectors, etc. -- and I asked the supervisor where they were going. "We incinerate them when they're discontinued," he answered. "Incinerate them? Well, can I take them if you're just going to burn them?" I asked. "No," he answered without explanation. I remember thinking what a big, stupid dufus this guy was, and how I'd never get anywhere with him, but I went ahead and asked him why I couldn't take them. "Because they're patented," he said. When I pointed out to him that this had nothing to do with anything, he turned around and shouted in a booming voice to the guy who dealt with the incinerator, "Hey, Joe. We've got some discontinued stuff here. Come get it and make sure it burns."
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Hamad bin Turki Salami wrote:

Maybe they hadn't yet paid a royalty on the parts that came due upon use or sale.
he turned

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That makes a great deal of sense. What were they manufacturing? Stereos with Dolby, perchance?
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Maybe he was just an asshole.
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" Maybe he was just an asshole."
This is the most likely reason.
Many people, especially in positions of minor authority, are real works of art.
Just be thankful you could find another job....and other surplus.
TMT
Cydrome Leader wrote:

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    The surplus stores which used to be around back in the 1960s and 1970s have all shut down.
    I used to pick up lots of Army surplus when I worked nearby at Ft. Belvoir, but that surplus place has been shut down.
    So -- most things now come from hamfests and swap meets.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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they shut down because the military sells their stuff through govliquidation.com. A real gold mine at times.
i
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

and those are dying too. A lot of people blame eBay, but there are other forces as well.
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You are right on that....I used to go to hamfests all the time....now I hardly bother.
TMT
Rich Osman wrote:

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What hamfests are in your area?
Andy
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    Well next weekend (not this one) is one at Berryville VA. This     is the one hamfest at which you can actually get a nice ham     dinner. :-)
    There is one in February which used to be in Vienna VA (my home     town), but is now at a nearby community college. (This is sadly     decreased in size, thanks to the loss of a regular location.)
    There are several at Timonium MD (West side of the Baltimore     Beltway.
    Several at Howard County, MD
    One at Manassas VA.
    One in Frederick MD.
    One at the Gaithersburg MD fairgrounds (back there after several     years wandering from place to place, and it is now sadly     shrunken compared to the prior years at Gaithersburg.
    There may be others which I forget,
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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