Re: NAR Board of Trustees

snipped-for-privacy@mac.com (James Duffy) wrote:


Yes but in a narrow tunnelvision way they are already set on with no significant changes from outside input.

Nothing stopping you from supporting him financially with donations. It is legal.

Jerry
--
Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
Opinion, the whole thing. <mail to: snipped-for-privacy@gte.net>
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I'm afraid that if Jerry were to win the election, he wouldn't be as honest and trustworthy as he is on RMR.
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pause....
ROTFLMAO!!!!!
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ADD/ADHD is usually inherited from one of the parents.
Phil Stein
On Wed, 9 Jul 2003 23:09:49 -0400, "shockwaveriderz"

Phil Stein
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Not really.
The problem with video games etc.. IS however the fault of the PARENTS not the kids in most cases.
we live such "busy" lives (grrr blah) that it is easier and lazier to just plop the kid in front of a tv with a new $40 game every other week than it is to actually go outside and PLAY with them or into the work room and BUILD something with them.
I see it EVERY SINGLE DAY and it SICKENS ME.
My kids will learn what it is to play for REAL before they will even know what a VIDEO game is and then if they want one its a trade. 1 hour of video game time must be paid for with 1 hour of HANDS ON REAL time (whether that be playing ball with the boy in the park (if that is still legal by the time I have kids) or building a doll house with my daughter etc..
It not that parents lack attention skills it that they have too much of their attention in the WRONG places.
Chris Taylor http://www.nerys.com /
wrote:

Model
in brainwashing them.....

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Tell that to the MDs that do research on it.
Phil
On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 07:39:24 -0400, "Chris Taylor Jr"

Phil Stein
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tell what to them ?
Chris Taylor http://www.nerys.com /
wrote:

succeeded
anyway?
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Oh shut up, Chris. You're talkin' out yer ass. You have no children, and to sit there at your keyboard and blab about "how you're going to do it better" just happens to anger me and most other parents who have actually raised children.
Steve
wrote:

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default wrote: > Oh shut up, Chris. You're talkin' out yer ass. You have no children, and > to sit there at your keyboard and blab about "how you're going to do it > better" just happens to anger me and most other parents who have actually > raised children. > Steve
Thank you. I struggled hard to come up with a better response.
For the record, I have two children 12 & 14. My son (the 12yr old) is a Star Scout about to make Life. He expects to make Eagle before he turns 15. He plays Hockey and he swims (talk about two completely different sports!). He spends a LOT of time with his friends, playing street hockey, basketball, swimming, etc.. He loves video games. He's probably not happy with me because I will not let him own "Grand Theft Auto". He is an 'A' student. My daughter's passion is swimming. She also like crafts. She plays the clarinet. She has recently become interested in photography (film, not digital). She doesn't like video games much, but she does like computer games (the whole SIM line in particular). And she watches a lot of TV. She is also an 'A' student. Neither of my children are on medication.
I'm not trying to brag, if I was I would have gone in to much more detail. I only list the high points to show that I have a little experience in parenting. I haven't finished the job yet (if you ever do) and I know the next few years can be just as challenging as the first few ones were (a child's basic personality is pretty much defined in the early years). While sometimes I complain about other people's kids, I've learned that I shouldn't criticize them unless I've walked in their shoes (if even then). Mr. Taylor, when you have equivalent parenting experience under your, er, well, what ever, then you can brag about what a good job you've done. Until then, do as Steve said.

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On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 07:29:19 -0500, default wrote:

The thought of Chris actually breeding isn't one I'd like to contemplate. I think prolonged Usenet sessions are a *good* thing for some people, in a Darwinian sense....
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True.
--
Jerry Irvine, Box 1242, Claremont, California 91711 USA
Opinion, the whole thing. <mail to: snipped-for-privacy@gte.net>
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If you ever met him in person, you'd realize that this is scarier than you think, but not very likely.
    Bob Kaplow    NAR # 18L    TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD"         >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD! <<< Kaplow Klips & Baffle:    http://nira-rocketry.org/LeadingEdge/Phantom4000.pdf www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org
Save Model Rocketry from the HSA! http://www.space-rockets.com/congress.html
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Chris Taylor Jr wrote:

BS. No parent is chaining their kid to a chair and shoving a bag of Cheetos in his face. Parents take their cues from the kids themselves, trust me, I have 3.

Chris, I can't count the number of teams that I coached for my 3 kids: soccer, baseball, roller hockey, softball. The only thing that they had to do was demonstrate a desire to participate.

There's nothing stopping kids from going outside, grabbing a couple of buddies and playing football or baseball. From what I can see, the problem lies with both parties. Parents should boot their kids outside like mine used to do saying "Go outside and get some of the stink blown off of you". ;-)
Mark Simpson NAR 71503 Level II God Bless our peacekeepers
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I am sorry I disagree. I have SEEN with my own eyes dozens of kids etc.. in the scenario I describe.
I have seen kids who WANT to do this or that but can not because the parent simply does not have the time for them so they buy them video games (or worse do not have the time AND do not buy them video games)
I have watched kid after kid with whatever attitudes toward activities because at home their are no activities.
No time to take them to the park or on a hike or camping. No time for wood crafts or other hobbies.
Video games are easy.
the KID is not legally old enough to make these kinds of decisions and for damned good reason. nature tends to take the path of least resistance. you might have to make them initially do more active things (although most are more than willing if not eager if started young)
your telling me when your kids were 3 years old they wanted nothing but video games ? how about 4 ? how about 5 ? 6 ? on and on. at some point they will get stuck into whatever pattern they were brought up into (most of the time)
once they get over 10 etc.. they now do not want to do more active stuff if they have not done much active stuff before. (path of least resistance)
I MIGHT give my kids a video game after than pass 10 years old. MAYBE.
I Have no doubt you are a fine parent. I have no doubt you have fine kids. I hope I am a good parent when I become one.
but your scenario does not alter or change the reality of what I have seen with my own eyes (ok eye)
I worked with other kids throughout jr high and high school and afterwards. I saw it every day.
I have seen dozens of families with young (under 7 or 8) kids who want nothing more than to go outside who have no interest in "nintendo"
they want to run play with their friends.
but after being told no time. have to work. etc.. (and in some cases this is reality they really do have to work) or 'm too tired. they resign themselves to playing video games to pass the time.
then when they are older and ABLE to go out on their own to some extent they no longer have the desire or passion to. they are now resigned to sit in front of a damned screen and play video games.
This is the of society to a point but to parents since they MAKE society.
I hope I can do my part to break this trend. I can only try.
Kids are born as a blank slate. they are what YOU and Society make them into for the most part. YOU and Society program their core with only few exceptions.
Chris Taylor http://www.nerys.com /

not
just
it
BUILD
know
video
that
time
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Chris Taylor Jr wrote:

Wrong again, Chris.
I used to believe the 'blank slate' theory (even though looking back at my own childhood, that should have disproved it). But then I had kids.
Each kid has their own personality, interests, metabolism, etc. You won't change that (much), and if you DO change it, you will permanently damage them to the point where they'll end up in therapy. In other words, if you try to 'force' a naturally introverted kid to be an extrovert, or vice-versa, it won't work.
That's not to say that parents don't have responsibility in raising kids, they do! But, the parent's job is to get the child to reach their greatest potential, STARTING WITH the tools the child was born with, and then moving on from there. While you won't get a natural introvert to be an extrovert, the good parent can help the naturally introverted child be slightly less introverted, to where they are at least accepted in the 'norm'. The same holds true for most other characteristics.
I have two kids. They are very different people, and their personal traits (many of them) were evident from birth. Some of these are physiological, some are psychological, but they are ALL very real. On the physiological side, for example, I have one kid who MUST get a great deal of sleep to function, and another who can get by with virtually none. On the psychological side, one child is very laissez-faire about getting schoolwork done, the other is almost compulsive. And there is no correlation to IQ about this, either.
There are certain things you can learn about by viewing others, Chris, and there are some things that are so all encompassing that you have to experience them to speak knowledgably about them. Raising kids is one of those things...
David Erbas-White
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David Erbas-White wrote:

<snip good post>

Something else I've noticed is that each child also inherits traits from each parent. Of my three kids, each has characteristics of me and of my wife, in different combinations. As a totally unscientific example, my wife is a picky eater, while I'm not. One child is picky, the other two are not.
They each grew up with the same household rule: "you have to try it before you can say you don't like it". They'll all try new foods, that's a learned behavior. One is much more likely to not want it again, although there's no way to predict ahead of time who will and will not like it.
Ted
--
"We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately."
Benjamin Franklin
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R Ted Phipps wrote:

Agreed in full, but it's also difficult to tell how much is 'genetic' versus 'environmental' (being picky about foods is a great example). I, for example, have an extremely severe eating disorder, and we went to great lengths during the kids' formative years to not have the kids exposed to it. Thus, they have not 'learned' that behavior. But, they definitely have different characteristics (from both of us).
What makes it worse (in the learned behavior department) is you can never tell whether kids will want to 'emulate' or 'reject' certain behaviors. For example, both of my kids have 'rejected' my behavior as a rocketeer... <G>
David Erbas-White
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On Sat, 12 Jul 2003 10:14:32 -0700, David Erbas-White

Lord know SOME of it's definitely genetic. I've got the curse of parents everywhere, a child just like her father. . . .
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = Mark B. Bundick mbundick - at - earthlink - dot - net NAR President www.nar.org
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My father went one step further. He always wanted me to have a child that would do to me what I did to him. Sadly he never got to see his wish.
Insanity is heridetary: you get it from your kids.
    Bob Kaplow    NAR # 18L    TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD"         >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD! <<< Kaplow Klips & Baffle:    http://nira-rocketry.org/LeadingEdge/Phantom4000.pdf www.encompasserve.org/~kaplow_r/ www.nira-rocketry.org www.nar.org
Save Model Rocketry from the HSA! http://www.space-rockets.com/congress.html
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A parents job is to screw their children up as little as possible....the good parents are those that screw their kids up the least......
shockie B)
proud parent of a minimallly screwed up daughter.....
wrote:

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