Round Wings

I want to do some round wings aircraft.
So far I have the MAI Avrocar, the Special Hobby Sack and the Mando
Models Discoplane.
Anybody know of others and 1/72 kits of them?
TIA
Tom
Reply to
maiesm72
Loading thread data ...
Thanks Pat.I had already added the Sword Vought V-173 and Pegasus XF5U-1 for a total of five on hand.Now to seek out a Fine Molds XF5U-1. Actually I need two, one for a friend.Happy modeling,TomOn Feb 11, 11:15=A0pm, Pat Flannery wrote:> snipped-for-privacy@netscape.com wrote:> > > Anybody know of others and 1/72 kits of them?> >
formatting link
ones that probably never existed:
formatting link
> Pat
Reply to
maiesm72
The details in the Unicraft kit of the BMW Flugelrad I V1 state that the single prototype was built in 1943 and made a maiden flight between August and September of the same year from the Czech airfield of Prag-Kbely.
Does anyone know if this actually took place? I want to do models of round wing aircraft, but I'm sticking to those which reached at least the prototype stage, not paper projects. Of the six that I have so far only the XF5U-1 never flew.
TIA,
Tom
Reply to
maiesm72
I don't know about models, but I have been collecting patents, NACA papers, and anything else I can find on circular airplanes. If anyone wants anything, ask. The best stuff seems to be from Zimmerman who was responsible for the V-173.
Mike
Reply to
mholt
In all likelihood the whole Flugelrad story is a complete fabrication; as you go back in time, things about it become just a rumor, and over the years more and more details are added to it, like the Loch Ness monster and Bigfoot stories. Supposedly, it was based on this technology:
formatting link
completely forgot this wonder, which although there is no model of it available, has to be seen to be believed, and did indeed get built, at least as a subscale prototype. Behold René Couzinet's RC-360 Aerodyne in all of its glory:
formatting link
was to be lifted by rotor blades around its periphery, and driven forward by a jet engine under its belly. The rotors are spinning here:
formatting link
at rest here:
formatting link
's a close-up of the rotors:
formatting link
as I might, I have never been able to figure out the principle this thing was supposed to use to generate lift and control itself... it appears there are two sets of rotors at two different levels on both the top and bottom sections of the saucer, and that the top and bottom probably counter-rotate to cancel out the gyroscopic effect. Here's more on it, from the USAF Air Intelligence Digest in 1956:
formatting link
project, in a warped form, could be responsible for the Flugelrad story also, as the layout is very similar...besides which, Couzinet did some work with the Germans in occupied France during WW II.
Pat
Reply to
Pat Flannery
I'm a diehard fan of two wings and round engines, but round wings and two engines? Hmm....
-- Message posted using
formatting link
information at
formatting link
Reply to
Disco58
My interest in round winged aircraft was begun several years back when I stumbled across one stored in the rafters of a garage/shed that was once a hanger. All that was left was the wood and canvas "rotor" which would have been attached to a DH.4. The lower wing was shortened, but left in place, as were the tail unit, landing gear, engine and cowling. The circular device was attached to a shaft between the cockpits.
As the aircraft picked up speed the "rotor" began rotating, creating lift. An autogyro, right? But wait. As the speed increased the "rotor", which was cut into a spiral, expanded like a De Vinci airscrew, giving tremendous lift. Cool, huh?
I have photos of the thing and copies of the patent. It never made it as far as being attached to an aircraft as the arrival of slats and flaps ended the need. The inventor, Marin County's first Sheriff, went on to become the first county fish and game officer as well. He patrolled from Stinson Beach where his hanger was/is. On one occasion he exchanged gun fire with poachers in West Marin.
After this batch of round wings I may attempt Selmer's odd machine.
Cheers,
Tom
snipped-for-privacy@some.doma> > >I'm a diehard fan of two wings and round engines, but round wings and two
Reply to
maiesm72
According to the ancient Doug Rolfe book, "Airplanes of the World", there were a apparently number of fairly successful flying disks going back to the pioneer era (pre-WWI) like the Kitchen "Doughnut" (circular biplane wings with central circular cut outs), Cedric Lee's Disk craft (monoplane), and the Miami University "Flying Saucer" (parasol disk wing). Contact me via email at braungart (at) verison (dot) net if you'd like scans.
Reply to
The Old Man

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.