Ship Finishing Observation - Why Rarely Weathered??

pj wrote:


Zincs were coomon on all warships of the era, usually to provide sacrificial anodes near the props and rudders. Regardless of how smart the German engineers were, they did not always have the materials needed to do the jobs how they should have been. Even the USN cut metallurgical corners on some things at the time because the sheer amount of material needed.

Yes, just like we did when ships came into dryodock for refit or repair.

It's still generally overdone byodellers.
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Ships on standard brass pedestal displays look really stupid if weathered heavily. Either on keel blocks with a grungy/slimy drydock base or at sea on a "water" base and weathering them makes sense.
The relatively "unweathered" style is referred to as Admiralty or dockyard style and the only "weathering" that is appropriate is a subtle dark wash and *maybe* a very subtle drybrushing to make detail pop. It's not really weathering since it is simply an artistic technique to enhance the detail, not to show the effects of weather per se.
Now if we could just get some of the aicraft guys that produce the plastic equivalent of Tammy Faye Baker/drag queens on a Friday night overweathered/enhanced/subtle as an apple peel wrapped around a cubic foot of DU to head weathering school to stop and learn SUBTLETY, all would be right with the world.......
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