G gauge mechanisims?

Hi all, (well at least anyone interested in model railways in G gauge)
I want to build a rail mounted pick-up truck based on one of the 1:24th
scale diecast vehicles.
There are a number of proprietry mechanisms available which could possibly be used, but none that I can inspect first-hand as there are no model shops stocking G gauge within driving distance.
Mechanisms that might do the job: - Bachmann track cart/jigger. - Bachmann 2 axle tram. (trolley) - Bachmann 44 tonner. - Bachmann Shay trucks. - Hartland mechanisims. - Aristocraft Diesel truck. - LGB mechanisim.
Taking off an axle should be easy enough to create a single axle drive and a wheel diameter of 31mm (1 1/4") should be about right. A narrow width over mechanisim would be handy to fit it between the Ute frames.
I assume the Bachmann jigger would be too cheap and nasty to consider but what about the rest for reliability robustness and suitability?
Regards, Greg.P.
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(snip)

I don't have experience with all of the mechanisms you mention, but offer the following: o I currently have a Bachmann trolley laid up because of a split axle drive gear - apparently the plastic used is not tough enough, or the interference fit of the gear on the axle is too tight overstressing the gear o Cheaper Bachmann, particularly the earlier versions 4-6-0's are very cheap and not very durable - I've had to repower with BBT mechanisms o I recently acquired a Bachmann 3-truck Shay, and it is very high quality o I have one LGB loco, a 2-6-0 and it is very well made and durable. It came with track slider shoes which are a big help for outdoor operation - I use it to pull my track cleaner car before operating the other locos o I have a couple Aristo Alcos, and they have very reliable and durable power trucks - unlike Bachmann, the Aristo design allows one axle to pivot relative to the other for better tracking, although that would not be to important for your single axle application
Have you considered making a drive? My local hobby shop has a couple replacement LGB Buhler motors with worms on the shaft and some replacement LGB geared wheelsets in its old parts box that could be had for a song. It would seem that a simple "U" shaped bracket to mount the motor and align the worm to the axle would suit your needs and might fit better up under a truck chassis. Good luck, Geezer
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Geezer wrote:

It's a relatively common problem, caused I believe by pressing the gear onto the axle before it has gooled sufficiently.

I guess I'll find out, I have an old one and a new one for building new superstructures on.

The trucks are offered separately, I guess for upgrading first production series models.

I have an 0-4-0 but it cost so much that I'm reluctant to dismantle it just for the mechanisim.

That sounds good! Nowadays I always make two axle locos with a rocking axle for reasonable track current collection.

That's probably the best way to go but the only gears I've found so far are HO and perhaps not robust enough. It had struck me that by the time I've shelled out for LGB or NWSL motor and gears I could have bought a complete proprietry model and have a whole stack of spare bits in my junk box - it also struck me that I'm going to need a much bigger G scale junk box than for HO! =8^)
Regards, Greg.P.
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I really like LGB stuff, because it has proven itself quiet and smoot running. However, the replacement mechanisms I have seen in our hobby shops is always at least two axles. For a pickup truck, you really need something that powers just one axle.
Here in the Northwest of the USA, one can find products from these guys: http://www.nwsl.com/pdf%20prod%20list/pdf%20prod06.htm
But of course you would have to order from overseas to get them. I doubt any NZ stores stock their stuff.
--
-Glennl
The despammed service works OK, but unfortunately
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Wolf wrote:

Do any O gauge mechanisms exist these days?
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Greg Procter wrote:

[...]
Try North west Short lines (www.nwsl.com) for starters. haven't studied the bits and pieces in detail, but IMO you could start with one of their O scale mechs.
HTH
--


Wolf

"Don't believe everything you think." (Maxine)
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Wolf wrote:

Good point - I've used their HO products for several decades and now read their G/I section but didn't think to read the Ogauge section - Duhh!!
Regards, Greg.P.
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