Model Power N-Scale wheel flanges too large

I recently purchased several 'Model Power' brand N-scale heavy weight passenger cars. I discovered the wheel flanges are too deep for running
on Atlas code-55 track. The flanges bump on the cross ties. I contacted Model Power and was told their wheels are made for "standard N-scale track" which I suppose is code-80. They don't make any replacement wheels for code-55. The only solution I can think of is to turn down the flanges in a lathe or chuck them in an electric drill to file them down. However I'm not sure if they will run properly through turnouts after doing this.
I'd appreciate any advice for this problem.
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
To be honest, I have not tried them in the MP trucks. The MP cars have a PRR specific truck and I swapped them out for MT passnger trucks - then put low profile wheels in them. Atlas has metal low profile wheels with 2 different axle lengths....
Jim Bernier
D&Hfan wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't bother cutting/turning down wheels on rolling stock; you would only do that on a locomotive. Replacement wheelsets or whole new trucks (Micro Trains) are the answer here. Some trial and error with other wheelsets will find something that works. As far as loco flanges, some Life-Like diesels are too large but all other recent stuff should be fine. And NorthWestShortLine now makes replacement wheels for LL diesels.
-John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What *I* did was replace the trucks with Micro-Trains six-wheel passenger trucks.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
D&Hfan wrote: I recently purchased several 'Model Power' brand N-scale heavy weight passenger cars. I discovered the wheel flanges are too deep for running on Atlas code-55 track. The flanges bump on the cross ties. I contacted Model Power and was told their wheels are made for "standard N-scale track" which I suppose is code-80. They don't make any replacement wheels for code-55. I'd appreciate any advice for this problem. ---------------------------------------------------- I replaced my Model Power heavyweight wheelsets with either Precision Masters (now Red Caboose) wheelsets and/or Micro-Trains Low Profile wheelsets. These come with various length axles. I don't recall the part numbers.
Red Caboose: http://www.red-caboose.com /
Micro-Trains: http://www.micro-trains.com /
BTW, you'll be happier anyway since the Model Power wheelsets (both the one piece plastic and the metal ones) aren't very free rolling. The early metal ones had off center axles and didn't perform well.
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad: http://www.billsrailroad.net Brief History of N Scale: http://www.billsrailroad.net/history/n-scale Resources: Links to over 600 helpful sites: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bills-favorite-links Bookstore: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bookstore.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the info'. How critical is the axle length between the points? These 'Model Power' ones are about 0.565"
Bill wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
D&Hfan wrote: Thanks for the info'. How critical is the axle length between the points? These 'Model Power' ones are about 0.565" ------------------------------------------------- Of course, the wheels are always the same distance apart (if they're in gauge).
The best bet would be to find the identical length axles if you can. Precision Masters made wheelsets in a variety of axle lengths but when Red Caboose purchased PM, I believe they discontinued these.
You might find a hobby shop that has a stock of the old PM wheels. They came in a neat plastic box that could be used as a steel coil cover on a flat car.
It's only the tips of the axles that vary. I found that as long as the wheelset stays in the truck frame without falling out, you shoud be ok.
If you happen to get some wheelsets with axles that are a little bit too long, you can ream the axle seats in the truck frames slightly with an X-Acto (or similar) #11 blade. I've done that a few times successfully. Don't overdo it though since there's no turning back!
You don't want the car "wandering" or "galloping" on the track! The older Model Power metal wheelsets with the off-center axles would "gallop."
If you ream too large of a "seat" for the axle, the car will "wander."
I hope you know what I'm trying to say here.
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad: http://www.billsrailroad.net Brief History of N Scale: http://www.billsrailroad.net/history/n-scale Resources: Links to over 600 helpful sites: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bills-favorite-links Bookstore: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bookstore.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
D&Hfan skrev i

According to the Red Caboose web site the axle lenght is .563in so they should fit well.
You may also consider the Intermountain 33" metal wheel sets, I just measured the axle length on some to 14.15mm or .557in. I have converted two Red Caboose flat cars using Micro-Trains trucks but I still have the Red Caboose trucks and the Intermountain wheel sets fit well.
The Intermountain wheel set axles are too long for Micro-Trains trucks and will not turn freely. M-T wheel sets axle length is .542in or 13.8mm.
--
Faithfully
Erik Olsen
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
D&Hfan wrote: Thanks for the info'. How critical is the axle length between the points? These 'Model Power' ones are about 0.565" --------------------------------------------------- I found the original Precision Masters boxes and I had two sizes. The #1125 are .553" and the #1135 are .563". The package states that the #1125 are for Bachmann and Con-Cor. I might have used those. The #1135 are for Con-Cor freight and Kato. I might have used those.
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad: http://www.billsrailroad.net Brief History of N Scale: http://www.billsrailroad.net/history/n-scale Resources: Links to over 600 helpful sites: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bills-favorite-links Bookstore: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bookstore.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm beginning to wonder if replacing these wheels (six/car) is going to cost almost as much as I paid for the cars. I'm still tempted to turn down the flanges. It looks like I would have to remove only a few hundredths of an inch. I don't have a lathe but I think it could be done with my drill press. I noticed that the part of the wheel that sits on the track (hub?) is smaller on these MP wheels than other brands, so they must turn faster. Does this mean they and the truck bearing holes will wear faster?
Thanks again for the help.
Bill wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
D&Hfan wrote: I'm beginning to wonder if replacing these wheels (six/car) is going to cost almost as much as I paid for the cars. I'm still tempted to turn down the flanges. It looks like I would have to remove only a few hundredths of an inch. I don't have a lathe but I think it could be done with my drill press. I noticed that the part of the wheel that sits on the track (hub?) is smaller on these MP wheels than other brands, so they must turn faster. Does this mean they and the truck bearing holes will wear faster? ---------------------------------------------------- I wouldn't worry about the wheels wearing out. I have some old Bachmann cars that have been on the tracks since 1969 and the wheels have never worn out. I believe the trucks are Delrin or a similar engineering plastic that will probably last forever without wearing out.
As for turning down the flanges, I'd sure give it a try if you think you can do it. That'd be the easiest way.
I don't have a drill press. What I'd probably do would be to slip one wheel off the axle and put the axle in a variable speed drill (or electric screwdriver) and turn it against a sharpening stone. I have a chuck for my electric screwdriver (Micro-Mark sells these). I'm too careless to use my Dremel for a job like that.
It's unfortunate that Atlas didn't make their code 55 track compatible with existing equipment.
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad: http://www.billsrailroad.net Brief History of N Scale: http://www.billsrailroad.net/history/n-scale Resources: Links to over 600 helpful sites: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bills-favorite-links Bookstore: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bookstore.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe Ellis wrote:

Oops - I owe you one; should have read all the thread before replying to Bill. By his logic we'd still all be running O-27 tubular 3 rail.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
E Litella skrev i

Micro-Trains have started including low-profile wheel sets with cars. Those wheel sets are ok even though they are plastic.
I'm in the process of converting a string of Intermountain reefers and box cars. Even though they come with low-profile plastic wheel sets the quality is not that good so I exchange them for Intermountain metal wheel sets.
It's not just a question of flange height but also the quality must suffice. We also need cars to come with body-mounted compatible couplers. It's an awful lot of converting as it is.
--
Faithfully
Erik Olsen
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
steve caple wrote: Oops - I owe you one; should have read all the thread before replying to Bill. By his logic we'd still all be running O-27 tubular 3 rail. --------------------------------------------------- Yep! <g>
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad: http://www.billsrailroad.net Brief History of N Scale: http://www.billsrailroad.net/history/n-scale Resources: Links to over 600 helpful sites: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bills-favorite-links Bookstore: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bookstore.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Corelane wrote:

Nothing, if what you want is the look of the toy trains you remember. But I remember envying friends who had American Flyer because there wasn't that stupid third rail right in the middle, and the stuff generally looked more train like and less toy like. Of course the "ties" sucked on both . . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
steve caple wrote: should have read all the thread before replying to Bill. By his logic we'd still all be running O-27 tubular 3 rail. ------------------------------------------------- Steve, are you trying to tell me that <<O-27 tubular 3 rail>> isn't the de facto standard for model railroading any more? <G>
Things are sure changing fast these days!
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad: http://www.billsrailroad.net Brief History of N Scale: http://www.billsrailroad.net/history/n-scale Resources: Links to over 600 helpful sites: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bills-favorite-links Bookstore: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bookstore.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe Ellis wrote: If you use a low-speed device like a power screwdriver to turn the metal Model Power wheelsets, try using a grinding stone in a Dremel as well. Odds are the screwdriver won't turn fast enough to do the job well. The combination should make the job fast and easy... not to mention not build up as much heat on the wheel. -------------------------------------------------- A great idea, Joe! Thanks. Part of what needs to be avoided is heat buildup since the Model Power metal wheels have plastic inserts.
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad: http://www.billsrailroad.net Brief History of N Scale: http://www.billsrailroad.net/history/n-scale Resources: Links to over 600 helpful sites: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bills-favorite-links Bookstore: http://www.billsrailroad.net/bookstore.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bill wrote:

The wheels on these MP heavy weight passenger cars appear to be all metal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not likely, otherwise they'd short out the layout. There's an insulator in there SOMEWHERE...
--
Joe Ellis The Synthetic Filker TesserAct Studios
Please Note: ALL email from hotmail.com is deleted UNREAD
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe Ellis wrote:

Of course you're right. There is a black plastic insulating hub on one wheel of each axle. I must have had a senior moment. I keep forgetting these model trains run on electricity. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.