N&W 2-8-8-2 - question

Can someone please tell me what consists this engine would most likely
have pulled. Also, what other railroad(s) would this N&W engine have
potentially done busines with at an interchange?
Thanks So Much!
Matt
Reply to
Matt & Kathleen Brennan
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2003 15:39:02 -0500, Matt & Kathleen Brennan
wrote:
Coal, coal and more coal. Perhaps some general freight as well.
Not sure that I completely understand the second part of the question, but N&W interchanged with these roads as well as some others. B&O, C&O, NYC, Southern, L&N, Virginian, ACL, SAL
Captain Handbrake
Reply to
Captain Handbrake
On the other hand, 6 of the USRA versions were sent to the Northern Pacific to alleviate their power shortage... I got one of the P2K 2-8-8-2s in Undec and changed it to be a NP loco....
:D
Kennedy
Reply to
Kennedy (no longer not on The Haggis!)
During WWII N&W sold some Y3s to someother railroads among them ATSF and UP. ATSF used them for helper service on the mountain pass grades and then sold them to Virginia RR. Paul
Reply to
res0xur8
Yeah, they sold them to the Virginian, and then they ended up back on the N&W. Well, would have if any survived long enough to go through the merger. :) 'till later....
-- Andrew Cummings | snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
Reply to
Andrew Cummings
What did the "V" use to replace them?
Reply to
res0xur8
: What did the "V" use to replace them?
I believe the "V" was merged with the N&W.
Reply to
KTØT
Train Masters, I believe.
Reply to
Mark Newton
Yeah, Train Masters, aka Fairbanks Morse H-24-66s. I'm not sure that any of the 2-8-8-2s lasted until the end (aka, N&W merger), but I know the FMs did. And the N&W used them up until the 70s, and a little into the 80s. 'till later....
-- Andrew Cummings | snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
Reply to
Andrew Cummings
Could a Union Pacific [purchased] 2-8-8-2 be used to haul a Pacific Fruit Express [PFE] train?
Thanks! Matt
Reply to
Matt & Kathleen Brennan
Could a Union Pacific [purchased] 2-8-8-2 be used to haul a Pacific Fruit Express [PFE] train?
Thanks! Matt
Reply to
Matt & Kathleen Brennan
Unlikely. Kratville, in "Motive Power of the Union Pacific", comments that although the N&W Mallets were received in good condition, their frames were too light for fast service on the UP. He states the N&W locos first worked the Butte line, but later were generally restricted to Rock Springs coal mine work. It's possible one may have served briefly as a helper on Sherman Hill, so you might put an ex N&W Mallet in front of a Big Boy on a reefer block to go up your helper district. But I'd doubt the N&W locos were ever the sole power on a loaded UP reefer train. GQ
Reply to
Geezer
The locos were mostly used for coal service but could also handle the regular freight. The locos were slow and couldn't keep up with the speeds desired by some roads so you'd want to use them for heavy trains that didn't go very fast. The boilers are somewhat small for doing anything fast and was the reason why they went so slow - they couldn't get enough steam produced to go more than about 30mph with a load.
-- Bob May Losing weight is easy! If you ever want to lose weight, eat and drink less. Works evevery time it is tried!
Reply to
Bob May
Good Evening All,
I suspect the size of the drivers also had much to do with the speeds at which they ran. Bob Rule, Jr. Hatboro, Pa.
Reply to
EBTBOB
Actually, it was the back pressure in the low-pressure system which slowed them (and all other true Mallets) down. N&W came up with the bridge-pipe front end and combined that with larger piston valves to free up the front end and get the modern Ys working up to 40-50 mph.
David Thompson
"The humans founded America, mastered the nuclear forces, and destroyed the original Mars about thirty thousand years ago." "So George Washington was there when they split the atom?" "Could have been."
-from "Triumph of the Terrans", copyright 24L1042
Reply to
James D Thompson
I'd like to see any of the modern N&W engines fitted with a Lempor front end - then they'd go! :-)
Reply to
Mark Newton
The N&W replaced the steam with diesels very quickly and at a later timeframe than the other railroads did. Because of the late date of the conversion, the makers of the diesels could provide the locos quickly as they had the reserve cap. to do so. It was kind of sad how fast that the steam disappeared from the tracks. There really wasn't even any bit of overlap or reserving of steam to cover the diesel operation.
-- Bob May Losing weight is easy! If you ever want to lose weight, eat and drink less. Works evevery time it is tried!
Reply to
Bob May
N&W dieselized very fast. The decision was made about the time they were looking at the Virginian. The banks would not loan them money against their steam engines. They would loan then money with diesels as collateral. It appears that the steamers(no matter how modern they were) held little value other than scrap by that time. N&W went on a diesel buying spree, and could not get delivery fast enough so split the orders between EMD and Alco. N&W got into the diesel game so late that they leased 'E' units from either SAL or ACL for passenger service, and put brakeman 'dog houses' on the J's tenders so they could be used in freight service.
Jim Bernier
Bob May wrote:
Reply to
Jim Bernier

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