Which way do you prefer



Of course it is. Cats aren't people. Mine are front- declawed, and go in and out. They don't stray far, but they love to climb trees and catch prey (that they bring me as gifts). Then, when they're tired, they come in and sleep. One's over 15, and one's 11....so it's not like I've shortened their lives. Of course, we're in a semi-rural mountainous area, and I wouldn't recommend this in town.
Kris
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Where I live, if you let the cat outside, you may never see it again. We have red fox and cyotes. We already lost one that way. It wasn't pretty.
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I"ve had success in training both my indoor and outdoor cats, but I do think they're happier when they're allowed to go outside. Even if their life would be shortened, they're much happier during their lives.
A
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Me, too...if they're happier, they "listen". Mine don't get on the cupboards or tables, have certain places they can sleep.....and generally are quite adult about the entire thing. Unless they're outside, then they revert to nature. Neuter them, and that's most of the battle.
Kris
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I've had cats for close to 40 years and they really CAN be taught. The nature of the cat has a lot to do with it, though. A sharp "NO!" usually gets the desired results. However, they can be pretty hard-headed.
I have 3 indoor/outdoor cats and 2 strictly indoor (they decide) -- all "fixed." I don't expect the world from them and they never let me down. ;-)
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Angrie.Woman wrote:

From the cat's point of view, the trains sure look like prey.
--
Many thanks,

Don Lancaster
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Don Lancaster wrote:

From a cat's point of view he would make a great dummy load capable of dissipating heat and still have a 1:1 VSWR at 5.8 Ghz pushing 1.75kw. The only anomaly we did find is the impedance is closer to 75 ohms instead of 50.
Rita
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So you TRAIN your cats. Very punny.
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wrote :

give
Problem solved - they are now outdoor cats. :O)
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On Wed, 25 May 2005 23:27:12 GMT, "Kris Baker"

My cats NEVER go outside. I live in a high-traffic neighborhood, there are coyotes, etc., in the area, and a railroad right at the fence where about 85-100 trains a day pass by. Not to mention human beings who mistreat cats (and other animals as well).
I have visitors over all the time, the cats will come out and look at them, but never bother them, unless the visitor beckons the cat to come closer.
Maybe it's just a matter of experience and car in handling cats.
BTW, I also volunteer at a cat shelter. Whenever we have a "problem cat" there, guess who they call on to try and relax it....I'm also the only guy there, too.
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Best to handle cats by the tail. By the way, did you know that the frequency of pitch in a cat is a linear function of the velocity at which you spin them? :Oo
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wrote :

Try taking the rolling stock off the layout and upping the voltage a bit (say about 100VDC). Wait until the cat appears and take an inexpensive car you don't mind sacrificing and propel it by hand. Let go and watch the cat get a BIG surprise when it runs across the track to swipe at the car. :O)
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Keep the rolling stock. Sell the cats.
--
Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
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Have a LARGE male cat, about 25 pounds, that owns every horizontal surface in the house, except the kitchen counter and the train layout. Not tough to teach them what's wrong. He ignores the trains going around and around. Now, the two miniature Dauschunds we have just love the trains, and if I put them on the layout the trains are chase toys, and the scenery goes flying.
Dogs come when called, cats say to leave a message and they will get back to you.
pickle wrote:

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I have three cats, they don't bother the layout.
Rule 1: If you aren't playing on the layout, put up the expensive bits.
Rule 2: When the cat plays with the layout, never, ever pay attention to the cat so that the cat can tell. EG: If they learn that jumping on the layout is a way to get you to pay attention to them, they will jump on the layout when they want you to do something for them. Spray them with water from a squirt gun (a little vinigar mixed in works well), or throw a towel at them when they aren't looking... what ever gets the job done.
Rule 3: Dogs have masters. Cats have staff. If the staff isn't working the way you want them to, you do something about it. Same with cats and their staff.
Rule 4: The cat is a.l.w.a.y.s. on the wrong side of the door.
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