Will they run together?

(I posted this on the Yahoo! Group The HO Scale Model Railroad Club, and got no response, so I'm reposting it here.)
I picked up several new locomotives a short time ago, and even though
they're the same make and model, they have drastically different speeds. In your experience, have new locomotives smoothed out and started to run the same speed as they got broken in, or is the speed of the locomotive pretty constant throughout its lifetime?
Puckdropper
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says...

Some do, some don't. It's not that simple, sadly. Usually, the ones I had ran faster or slower out of the box, and stayed that way. They always got slightly faster after they broke in though. If the mechanism was really bad, they either burned out, or became much faster once the gears wore smooth. I had a couple of N Locos that were so bad I had to take them totally apart and clean the molding flash or burrs off of the gears to unbind them. One had a mechanism that used a shaft with a gear that was supposed have a shaft that went through a gear, and that gear was supposed to be spun by a worm gear on one side, and then it was supposed to turn the wheels by turning the gear in the center of the shaft. When I got the loco, it barely moved and the front truck gear was so tight on the shaft, it bound it up almost to the point of not letting it move.
The brass gears were pretty crude, and the hole in the one wasn't really round, it was egg shaped. The only way I could make the hole round was to make it bigger. I silver soldered the hole shut, and drilled a new hole slightly small, and used string with polishing compound on it and "lapped" the hole until it was exactly big enough to spin freely. Only took me two tries to get the hole exactly center. It really wasn't worth the effort. It was a POS, and never ran very well. It was one of the infamous made in Italy locos made by Lima.
BDK
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BDK wrote:

Thats a lot of work, reboring gears. I have a *honkin big* floor mounted drill press and dont like to do it even with the correct ol.
I've come to the conclusion that for any re gearing or gear repair, Northwest Short Line is my new best friend.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com says...

I had one of those little drill presses they used to sell, and clamped the gear down with adhesive tape to keep it from getting gouged up, and just missed it by about 1/32" the first time. The second time I nailed it. But I should have done what I was going to do, and eventually had to, make it into a dummy in the first place. It was a fine dummy unit. I used to stick it on the back of my 2 Con Cor PA-1s, one painted that yucky NYC green, the second, after it was scratched, in PC black, and then the dummy, in what the box said PRR Tuscan Red, but was actually an odd brown. Paint was done well, but it was flat out the wrong color.
BDK
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A better tool is a lathe. It's really pretty simple with the right tool.
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Bill Kaiser
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On 2/19/2008 6:49 PM BDK spake thus:

There's always that old trick of filling the gearboxes with toothpaste and running them for a while to lap the gears. This helped a lot with my Roundhouse Shay kit.
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snipped-for-privacy@but.us.chickens says...

Yeah, I did that on some of mine, but that one had so many hunks of brass on the teeth areas of the gears along with the hole issue, I had to take them all apart. I saw one on Ebay last year, it looked like it was new, but he said it barely ran.
BDK
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go add that comment to the "MDC HO and HOn3 Shays?" thread! It will be useful there as well...
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Does that still work? I used to do it, but new toothpastes seem to be much less abrasive than the ones from years ago.
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Bill Kaiser
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On 2/21/2008 8:26 AM snipped-for-privacy@mtholyoke.edu spake thus:

Worked pretty well a couple of years ago for me; I think I used Tom's (of Maine) hippy-dippy organic stuff.
You could always mix your own lapping compound with something like rouge, rottenstone or another fine abrasive.
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How about using Soft Scrub as a lapping compound? It is more abrasive than toothpaste.
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Frank Rosenbaum
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On 2/21/2008 11:46 AM Frank A. Rosenbaum spake thus:

Sure, that might be just the trick for such gears as are found on the Roundhouse Shay, which need lots of grinding down.
Once again, Frank, could you *please* fix your newsreader posting settings? Everything below your reply above gets cut off as part of your sig. It really can't be that hard to do. (I see you're using Microsoft Windows Mail 6.0.6000.16480.)
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If he wouldn't top post, there wouldn't be an issue. {;^)
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On Fri, 22 Feb 2008 08:48:04 GMT, "Brian Smith"

Agreed. I don't know why people started doing it this way on the internet. Back in the good old days of the BBS (Bulletin Board Systems), the quotes always came first followed by the replies...much easier to follow along with the thread. But for some reason when people started participating in the same type of online text discussion groups on the internet, they for some reason seem to want to move the quotes to the bottom.
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It's truly annoying having to read their response, then having to scroll down to see what they were replying to in the first place.
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On Fri, 22 Feb 2008 22:46:49 GMT, "Brian Smith"

They way most people used to do it was quote a few key lines from each section of a previous post, then comment on that themselves, then if they had more to say about another part, they'd quote that part, then post their comments following it. Very easy to read.
I notice that people do the same thing in email. I always reply below anything I am qouting, but inevitably when I get replies that include quotes, the new message is always at the top. It may not all be the fault of the person replying because I've noticed most email programs put the cursor above the quote. My own email software EUDORA PRO does this, but I always scroll down.
The other thing that kills me is how people leave all the headers from a million previous forwards in there too. Or they quote the entire previous message just to give a one sentence reply, instead of just the key section of the previous message.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

That's the default these days, but you can change that. Even in Eudora, IIRC. Look under the preferences/options for composing mail.
IMO, the default should be to place the cursor below the quote. But I suppose some "focus group" told MS etc that they didn't like scrolling down. One of the side effects of this stupid default is that people send ever lengthening e-mails, wasting bandwidth. In a year or two, after streamed video becomes commonplace, bandwidth will be precious again, and your ISP will charge you by the GB.
I think a carefully snipped reply shows that my correspondent took my maunderings seriously enough to compose their comments, rather than just typing.
BTW, my previous email client PMMail, which I can't use anymore since Bell Sympatico moved us all to a Hotmail proxy site, allowed you to highlight the part you wanted to quote before hitting reply. Very handy at times. Wish Tbird had that feature.
HTH
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wrote:
*trim*

*snip*
One argument I saw for placing the cursor above the quote is that you're starting in a perfect place to trim and snip the reply. That way, you don't wind up quoting someone's 5-screenfull long set of instructions just to say "Thanks for posting it."
Mozilla Mail (or it's predecessor Netscape Mail before AOL took over) would let you select where it puts the cursor.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

It could be but some people seem to be too lazy to snip the qouted text.
In most replies there is far too much quoted text, and qouting text from more than the last posting is senseless.
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Venlig hilsen/Best regards
Erik Olsen DK
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It is indeed.

It's amazing that some people will take the time to reply, but not the little bit of additional time to do it correctly and make their response easier to follow.

Trimming the post to which one is responding to, is the polite and proper method to employ. Doing so makes anyone reading your reply understand exactly what you're saying in relation tot he post you've replied to, without having to jump all around the place in an attempt to follow the train (pardon the pun) of thought.
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