Folwer 2-6-4

Having seen the new Hornby 2-6-4 tank, I was sortof unimpressed with how
plain it looks? Were they are plain as this? i.e.. it looks like how I
remember the body from 20 years ago, very little in the way on "bits" stuck
on individually aka superdetailing of late. The chassis looks great and the
one I saw working ran very well, but is it just a plain Jane?
I am trying to convince myself I want one!
Reply to
piemanlarger
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"piemanlarger" wrote
Thought you idolised EVERYTHING LMS Si???
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Personally I'm not impressed with the weathered version, and I'm convinced they would all perform even better with a tad more weight.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Unfortunately since constructing my 12 ft x 9 ft boards and starting work on the layout, once I realised around 5 coach trains would be max I developed gwrisallitis and have been buying small dogy tank locos since! Yes, my 8f is superb and will be on there doing some thing but the duchess (x2) and royal scot expresses are bound for club night use I fear! I want a fowler, but keep comparing it with my st4 tanks, to which there is no comparison!
Reply to
piemanlarger
The message from "John Turner" contains these words:
Having seen your pic, I agree that "ex-works" isn't how they should look. It needs a severe attack of weathering. I would imagine that there's more than one photo in your collection which shows them in "proper" condition...
Reply to
David Jackson
piemanlarger
I too wanted a Fowler and was very much looking forward to this realease, assuming that it would be to the same standard as the recent Black 5 and 8F. Sadly it isn't. It is nice enough, but just not quite good enough for me to buy it. The Black 5 and 8F can be superdetailed with a modicum of effort, but the Fowler would need a fair amount of work to bring it up to the same standard. I think I'll settle for building the Gibson kit (which will also give me the option of a Stanier "limousine" cab!)
-- Enzo
I wear the cheese. It does not wear me.
Reply to
Enzo Matrix
"piemanlarger" wrote
I'm not quite sure where you're at here Si? I've made some comparisons with several photographs of the prototype and they look pretty reasonable to me. I'm just trying to find a picture to show that some didn't have rivetted side tanks.
Apart from lack of weight and the need for some extra detailing, I'm more than happy with my loco.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
"John Turner" wrote
There are some excellent illustrations of Fowler 2-6-4T 4P tanks in "An Illustrated History of LMS Locomotives - Volume Five: The Post Grouping Standard Designs" by Bob Essery & David Jenkinson published by Silver Link Publishing (ISBN 0 947971 39 4).
Whilst I have not attempted to compare the model with the prototype's dimensions (no drawing to hand) it does appear to be a pretty faithful representation. In producing 42355 Hornby have correctly represented the version with smaller cab lookout and (what I assume are) welded side tanks.
Detail may be sparse, but the only glaring omission I can see is an accurate representation of the cylinder drain pipes.
The livery also seems to be accurate; even the lining on the footplate valence is authentic and proved my initial doubts to be unfounded.
Nice one Hornby - really nice! :-)
John.
Reply to
John Turner
"John Turner" wrote
I've now added about 85g of lead flashing inside the tank sides of the Fowler and have to say it has transformed the running. Any hint of hesitation at slow speeds has disappeared and performance through points has improved out of sight.
It's ironical that the *very* heavy class 50 diesel has been provided with traction tyres, but the lightweight 2-6-4T has surprisingly (but quite pleasingly) had them omitted.
I've got to admit that I *really* like this loco, which with this simple modification now rates in my book as second only in the Hornby range to the exceptional 8F 2-8-0.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Strong words! Its not that I dont like the Fwler, just it looks devoid of detail. It may be an accurate model, but it looks boaring! I suspect I will end up with one, but I will also pick up a clean std 4 to go with both my weathered ones. As for hornby, for me its 8f,Merchant Navy, Q1, Black 5, W/country, then maybe Fowler. That is until I have my 9f converted to loco drive and sort out the 3 mile gap between the Britania tender and loco, its so wide by the time the fireman has carried the coal between the two it had turned to diamonds!
Reply to
piemanlarger
What is lead flashing? Any idea what it is called here in the usa at Home Depot for example? Thanks Rob
Reply to
Rob
"John Turner\
Traction tyres?
Ya gotta be kidding?
-- Cheers Roger T.
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of the Great Eastern Railway
Reply to
Roger T.
"Rob" <
Home Depot?
North America?
In the UK they use, or used to use, lead for flashing. In North America lead used for flashing is very rare. These days your flashing is more likely to be plastic or tar paper.
Lead flashing = sheet lead.
BTW, never shop at Home Depot, they're useless for most things. You're much better off going to a building supply store, which Home Depot isn't.
-- Cheers Roger T.
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of the Great Eastern Railway
Reply to
Roger T.
"Rob" wrote
It's thin sheet lead which is used on roofs to aid waterproofing them.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
I added 75 g of weight to my tank sides, do you think it would have looked better on the inside!!!! Also added a no 22 smoke unit failry easily, just a bit of drilling in the chimney needed. Anyway, as you say it perfomes superbly. Dont know what make of otor Hornby are using latley but they run superbly from a dead slow crawl to a probably too hiogh a speed. Handled 7 "unweighted" Bachmann mk 1 with ease. Now to turn various shades of brown and black!
Reply to
piemanlarger
"piemanlarger" wrote
Stupid boy! ;-)
John.
Reply to
John Turner

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