Heaviest R to R weathering yet?

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The message from Robt P contains these words:
Needs weathering. It looks as though somebody has heard the story that drivers used to use an oily rag to wipe the cabside to find out the number, and they've done that to an "ex-works" loco. The numbers were visible through many years of grime - seems to me that the Golden Rule has been forgotten. Golden Rule? Look at the photographic evidence. Here's a photo:
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(It's not my photo, so it won't be there for more than a couple of days). Notice that despite the grime the number is still clearly visible and hasn't needed the oily rag treatment.
Another point about the model: Why has the BR totem on the tender been cleaned with an "oily rag"?
Nice model. Looks like a bit of thought has gone into it, but not enough. Shame, really.
Reply to
David Jackson
IIRC, wiped clean numbers were quite a regular feature on freight loco's. Tender emblems, less so.....
Cheers Robt P.
Reply to
Robt P
I like the wiped clean bits too (I'll make a note!), but it looks to me exactly like someones pointed an airbrush just above the middle driving wheels and pulled the trigger.....
I get me coat..
Richard
Reply to
beamendsltd
On 23/05/2007 15:54, Robt P said,
I think someone has confused "weathering" with "spraying it all brown". You would have thought that if Hornby were going to do this then they might have looked at some photos, or at least read Martin Welch's book.
Reply to
Paul Boyd
beamendsltd wrote in news:38a397e74e% snipped-for-privacy@btconnect.com:
....
No don't.
I think that it looks awful, as others have remarked some fool has simply oversprayed the entire model with a sigle colour then painted on a bit of water staining ... it looks sh one t.
There's an art to weathering.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
Perhaps they were taking inventory and needed to know which railway company it belonged to? :o)
(kim)
Reply to
kim
That's probably exactly what they did do to it!
But it's an art that takes time and money and skill, whereas this was done by someone on a production line, being paid about 50p an hour. If you want realistic weathering you will have to pay more than £6.50 for it.
Fred X
Reply to
Fred X
"David Jackson" wrote
I don't ever recall seeing a dirty steam loco during the BR era which had its number cleaned in this way - although I'm not saying it *never* happened. As a young spotter in the 50s and 60s I remember often being totally unable to read the cabside number and had the rely on the smokebox numberplate for identification.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
In "Power of the Jubilees" there's a colour picture of an engine at St Pancras which has had its number cleaned in this way. It looks very much like a patch transfer applied to a model. I expect the same picture is somewhere on the internet by now.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
"kim" wrote
There's a couple of images in that book which would confirm the practise, but there are dozens more where this clearly has not occurred. I'd be inclined to suggest that the latter was the norm.
I've got an O-gauge model of an L&Y Pug 0-4-0ST which has been weathered in just that way, but I'll still claim it was not an everyday event.
John.
Reply to
John Turner

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