Just another Bachmann rumour.......

From a friend who's been talking to senior personnel at Barwell.....
nudge/nudge/wink/wink.
LNWR Super D (G2) 0-8-0
Cheers,
Mick
Reply to
newbryford
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"newbryford" wrote
Wouldn't totally surprise me with there being a recently restored preserved example, but I can't see it being a massive seller.
Would I have one? Maybe, but by no means a certainty.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
"John Turner" wrote
It would seem to be a well-regarded loco among some modellers who like hardcore dirty freight action, but then again, that doesn't translate to high street sales. I look forward to MRJ's review crew getting their hands on it - they seem pretty thorough (and often positive) about recent RTR and there appears to be an LNWR element among them - some kitbuilt Super Ds have appeared in their pages over the last few years. It would at least look better on the average "don't care about authenticity, I just buy what I like" layout when paired with the ever-popular private owner coal wagons, in a way that nothing in BR livery ever will. Its low-speed hauling capacity (motor, gearing, adhesive weight) had better be up to the job!
Tony Clarke
Reply to
Tony Clarke
"John Turner" wrote in news:ebj1ch$g75$ snipped-for-privacy@newsreaderm1.core.theplanet.net:
I would without a shadow of a doubt
Reply to
Chris Wilson
In message , Chris Wilson writes
Me too, especially if it is low-geared and will pull over 50 wagons up a 1 in 75 incline.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
In message , Enzo Matrix writes
Yuck! There are far better locos to produce first, like a 42XX/5205 2-8-0T and 72XX 2-8-2T for starters.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
butbutbut... Just imagine all the different liveries you could use for a Claughton.
You could have it in black or red or... well... black again... ;-)
Reply to
Enzo Matrix
Yuck! There's enough Great Western rubbish available. There isn't a single LNWR loco as yet.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
Oh great some these for us Great Eastern people. Would be in if Bachmann and Hornby noticed that are actually Railways in the East of England.
Not asking for mush just a J15 and a K1 !
David
Reply to
davidcharlesworth
"Tony Clarke" wrote
My problem is that I model east of the Pennines, and they didn't work in the area that interests me during my era.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
The message from Jane Sullivan contains these words:
Preferably in N-gauge.
Yebbut I don't model the Gas Works Railway!
Reply to
David Jackson
In message , Enzo Matrix writes
And look at the liveries you can't have it in, like "BRITISH RAILWAYS", BR early crest and BR late crest.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
Didn't the Super D share the same boiler as the "Greater Britain" class... a unique 2-2-2-2 which, if the separate valve gear were set incorrectly could slip and remain stationary with the front drivers going forwards and the rear in reverse.
What an opportunity for DCC...
David
Reply to
chorleydnc
No. The original 3-cylinder compound 0-8-0s did use the GB boiler (complete with combustion chamber half-way along the barrel). They were the A class, IIRC. A larger boiler (without combustion chamber) went onto the four-cylinder compounds, some of which got a larger boiler and became 2-8-0 compounds. Later the 3-cyl and 4-cyl compound 0-8-0s were rebuilt with 2 inside cylinders and boilers like the 4-cyl compounds (these may have all formed the C class - I'm working from memory here!), while some got bigger boilers still to form the Ds. New-builds of Ds with superheaters became the Super Ds. The boiler of the super Ds were a lot bigger than those of the original compounds.
Not independent valve gear: Earlier Webb compounds had separate sets of valve gear for HP and LP (which had its own problems) but from the Teutonics on he used a simple slip eccentric for the LP gear. Problem was that occasionally when backing onto a train the slip eccentric would remain in the back position, and if the HP cylinders couldn't move the train forward enough to reverse the LP gear before the HP exhaust hit the LP cylinder.. well, you had a problem.
Nice opportunity for sound: I've read a description of a Webb (3 cyl) compound starting away with "a faint whistle from the chimney, followed by a series of immense, wide-spaced cracks" as the LP cylinder kicked in..
Reply to
Andrew Robert Breen

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