How to crack this Meilink safe

I bought this Meilink safe at auction. Sadly, the safe is locked and the combination is not available.
http://goo.gl/N2Nwcc
(Fortunately, at the same auction I bought a very nice Mosler safe with a secret lockable compartment that is open).
Before I scrap this Meilink safe, I want to crack it open to see if perhaps there is gold or diamonds or some such inside. I have a acetylene torch, forklifts, etc.
I am not interested in spending big money on locksmiths, safe crackers etc and I do not care to preserve the mechanism. This is a light duty safe and it weighs under 300 lbs.
Any quick ideas of what I can do with it without wasting too much time. Torch it from the bottom?
i
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On 3/20/2014 10:42 AM, Ignoramus10422 wrote:

As for myself, I never teach lock defeating on a public forum. Crooks could be reading.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

http://www.fireking.com/mk_home.html
--
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If it's a "fire safe", and not a security safe, it's easy as heck to get into. Just peel off the sheet metal, crush the gypsum insulation, and cut with anything you like to get the box inside open.
There's nothing 'secure' about a fire safe, because they aren't designed for that.
Even if it's a security safe, unless it's a high-end one, the door bolts can be cut pretty easily. It's unusual to find heat-sinking bolts in an inexpensive safe. (and even then, oxy-acetylene can cut the copper inserts, with some time and gas)
The whole idea of a 'hardened' safe is to make it take too long for a crook to feel comfortable staying on the job. Someone who has time and no fear of cops or discovery can get into almost any safe with common tools.
Lloyd
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On 20/03/14 22:39, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Yeh. Jist gie it some laldy.
-- Peter F
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On 2014-03-20, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

Lloyd, thanks. I will try.
Now what about this safe:
http://www.empiresafe.com/uploads/0000/0174/TRTL_Round_Door_Money_Safes.pdf
(the top picture, with dual key interior door)
This is the Mosler I was talking about buying along with the above mentioned Meilink.
I bet the inside compartment is very hard to get to!
i
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Ignoramus10422 wrote:

http://www.empiresafe.com/uploads/0000/0174/TRTL_Round_Door_Money_Safes.pdf

Ugh, this one looks VERY hard to get into through the door. I'll bet it is easier to go through the side on a safe like that, at least if it is a 5 number combo, which with all the other features it is likely to be.
Jon
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too bad it's not cold out anymore. you could fill it with water and let it freeze.
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On 3/20/2014 12:15 PM, Cydrome Leader wrote:

Just truck freight it to some place cold?
--
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Christopher A. Young
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We had the perfect winter here in Chicago for fun activities like that. Could have just left it outside with a tarp over it for a couple days.
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Call the DEA and tell them there's a joint inside.....
--
A host is a host from coast to snipped-for-privacy@nrk.com
& no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
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On 20/03/14 14:42, Ignoramus10422 wrote:

It looks more like a fire safe for protecting documents in a fire rather than a safe for valuables to me.
Which means torching it from the bottom will take a lot of time and gas, and will likely destroy any interesting contents.
Dropping it a few times from a great height onto concrete or similar, or running a forklift into it, may break the Ming vase or anything else breakable inside, but should not burn any bearer bonds, diamonds (yes, they burn), money etc..
You pays your money and you takes your chances ...
Shouldn't be too hard to crack though.
I think there is also a very quick technique with a forklift which crooks use, but I can't remember it.
- Peter F
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On 20/03/14 17:48, Peter Fairbrother wrote:

Peter,
I remember an old OU IIRC film and it showed the burning of diamond but they said the activation energy was so high the diamond needed to be heated white hot with the likes of an OA torch and then placed in liquid oxygen where it did burn. I know you're a chemist so maybe you know if there's more to it.
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On 20/03/14 20:36, David Billington wrote:

Short version:
Carbon in any form will burn in air at above 800C or so, which is within normal flame temperatures.
Above about 650C diamond actually burns at a slightly lower activation energy than graphite or amorphous carbon, though the difference is very small and temperature-dependent.
However diamond and graphite present nearly atomically-smooth surfaces to the air, and amorphous carbon doesn't. In the middle of these smooth surfaces the activation energy is quite a bit higher, and the temperature has to be above about 800C - while at the edges, and for the larger surface areas of amorphous carbons, the required temperatures are lower, perhaps 450-500C.
And of course the hotter it is, the faster it burns. LOX is cold, and it will cool the carbon as well as reacting with it, so it helps to have the diamond red-hot when it enters the LOX. Not so important with a large diamond, but people don't burn large diamonds in LOX very often.
Also diamond conducts heat better than anything else (except graphene) - and by quite a lot, it has about 5 times the thermal conductivity of the next contender, pure silver - so burning small lumps of it in LOX is a bit atypical.
-- Peter F
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On Thu, 20 Mar 2014 09:42:26 -0500, Ignoramus10422 wrote:

Richard Feynmann, in his memoirs, has a very amusing chapter about safe- cracking (he was the unofficial safe-cracker for the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, which he started mostly by playing jokes on his buddies).
The VERY FIRST thing you do is call the manufacturer and ask them if they have a default combination when they ship the safe. Most safes with combinations that can be changed ship with the factory combination, and many people (particularly if it's a fire safe) don't bother with changing it.
Try it. If it works, I'm a freaking genius. If it doesn't -- well, then I'm no worse off than I am now, right?
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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After that, hire a safecracker off craigslist:
http://blog.sfgate.com/cityexposed/2014/03/09/safecracker-wanted-for-25-percent-of-treasure/
Excerpt:
Wyatt, 51, is a man with time on his hands. He defines himself as a marginally employed computer repairman, a tinkerer in all things mechanical and an unrepentant coffee-shop slacker. He learned everything he knows about safecracking from a 34-page PDF document he found while doing a Google search on "safecracking for the computer scientist."
[...]
Rodgers recently bought a mid-century home in the Upper Castro neighborhood, which came complete with a 1-ton antique safe that prevented him from parking his car in the garage. He was offering 25 percent of the unknown contents to any person who could open the safe. The only catch was that the safecracker had to haul away the cracked safe when the job was done.
[...]
At 10:22 a.m., Wyatt cried out, "I got it!" Rodgers came running over just as the several-hundred-pound door fell off the safe - a contractor had removed the hinges in a previously failed attempt to get in.
Wyatt's reward was indeed 25 percent of the air in the safe. Apart from that, nothing was inside.
Still, Wyatt had a giant grin on his face as he held the inner workings of a lock like a shiny piece of gold. His curiosity had been quenched.
Elijah ------ no word how Wyatt, on his bicycle, was getting the safe out of there
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Ignoramus10422 wrote:

Looks like it might be a 3-number combination. If so, it shouldn't take very long to try all combinations.
Some time ago one of our kids locked my wife's ipod. Their punishment was to have to go through all combinations until they unlocked it. Didn't take them very long, working in shifts.
Jon
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On Thu, 20 Mar 2014 09:42:26 -0500

<snip>

First off I would try forcing a large, 6 ft or so pry bar in between the door and side. Maybe use a small sledge and some cold chisels along the same edge to gain some room for the big pry. It really depends on how many bolts are in the door, how long they are, how well anchored... But I think a big pry bar will bend/spring the side away for you to gain entry :)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Well, I got it opened. Details and photos here:
http://www.machinerymoverschicago.com/blog/How-to-Open-a-Meilink-Safe/
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Ignoramus23598 wrote:

Well, that's spectacularly boring! Or, did you lift out the 3 Kg of gold bars before you took the picture?
Jon
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