Haas vs. Fadal

I thought I'd separate this from the other thread.
We are talking to Fadal tomorrow. The main point of comparison seems
to be the box ways vs. linear rails in Haas. One argument I heard is
that Haas seems to be far more popular here (Southern California).
In general --and, without starting a war-- what should I know about
both of these machines and the respective manufacturers that might aid
in making a decision.
Thank you,
-Martin
Reply to
m
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Linear ways can easily be replaced and with minimal downtime whereas with box ways the worn parts basically need to be re-manufactured.
So is anal sex or at least that's what Ive heard.
I'm always pleased whenever one of my competitors decides to get a Haas.
Reply to
Bipolar Bear
============ It is always a good idea to have your second thoughts first.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
For whatever reasons (quantifiable, gut feeling or otherwise) fairly well certain in my own mind that they become less of a threat at exactly that instant in time.
Reply to
Bipolar Bear
Today I was told by a Haas operator that Fadals need to be re-indexed by hand every day if you turn them off at night.
True?
Reply to
m
True only if the machine isn't sent home before turning it off. Fadal users with even just a little bit of clue do it out of habit. And that's only with the Fadal control. With a Fanuc control, it doesn't matter.
And manually referencing the machine (Fadal control) is pretty much a no brain operation. Line up the reference marks manually, enter the CS (cold start) command, and 30 seconds later you're ready to machine.
This is a total non issue in a machine comparison IMO.
Reply to
Black Dragon
Martin:
True. But all you have to do before shutting it off is type in SETCS (means set cold start) then HO (means Home), then ENTER - the machine will then go to the cold start position. Then the next morning it's already at the cold start position. It becomes an automatic shut off procedure.
Reply to
BottleBob
type in SETCS
OK. Makes sense.
Thanks,
-Martin
Reply to
m
Both companies are suffering huge losses in sales these days. Haas has/is laying off hundreds of workers. That said, Haas has deeper pockets to stay afloat. The Fadal facility here in Chatsworth is shutting down new machine manufacturing in March (moving back east to parent company facility). Maybe better Haas service (more HFO's). Don't know. At the price points of those machines, it's like Ford or GM (maybe bad example to use automakers...)
-- Bill
Reply to
Bill
Given what is going to happen with taxation in California it might actually be absolutely brilliant to move manufacturing out of the state.
-Martin
Reply to
m
With Gene Haas its always been about not paying taxes.
Reply to
Bipolar Bear
Indeed
Reply to
Gunner Asch
I skipped the meeting, but the Memos showed that Gunner Asch wrote on Fri, 20 Feb 2009 23:28:05 -0800 in alt.machines.cnc :
It may have been just coincidental timing, but Colorado just spent 90,000 to send a "please come to Colorado, we love you" message to Southern California. Some of it was targeted valentines to CEOS, They report a couple inquiries already.
pyotr
-- pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
I would pick the haas control for ease of use.
Reply to
vinny
I'd be there in a hot minute if the work scene would improve there. As one who kayaks, skis, and mountain bikes... I could really like it there!
-- Bill
Reply to
Bill
HAHAHAHA....way too true.
Reply to
zymrgy
You think its going to get better here in California? This is like the Titanic.
Dave B
Reply to
Dave B
I skipped the meeting, but the Memos showed that Dave B wrote on Tue, 24 Feb 2009 17:32:13 -0800 in alt.mach>
Not quite. The Titanic was an Accident.
California is self-inflicted. -- pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
---------------- You may find this oped of interest.
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Unlike many of the WSJ oped pieces lately, this one resonates with me. What do our California participants think? Accurate? California is unique only in that it is first....
FWIW - In retrospect, the sinking of the RMS Titanic and resulting loss of life may have not been planned to occur where and when it did, but the conditions for the disaster such as knowingly providing less life boat capacity than the number of passengers/crew carried and the SOP of proceeding full speed ahead in areas of dense fog to keep to schedule were sure to result in a disaster sooner or later. If it hadn't been a collision with an iceberg, it would have been a collision with another ship.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee

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