The perils of "search & replace" in documentation.

I was looking at a "Model PL09564 PLUG-IN POWER MONITOR" on the web and printed out the product manual (one page), which I happened to
have in my jacket pocket when I was browsing in Maplin later that day and came across the same product labelled "Model 2000MU-UK PLUG-IN POWER MONITOR", which I bought.
The two products' sheets are the same except for such substitutions as
Congratulations on your purchase, and welcome to Prodigit 2000M Plug-in power monitor.
Congratulations on your purchase, and welcome to PL09564 Plug-in power monitor.
and the captions under the figures ("Figure 1 2000M Front Panel"; "Figure 1 PL09564 Front Panel"). Both of them even have the same "Funcion [sic] Configuration Table".
However, the one from Maplin is rated for "Altitude up to 2000m", whereas the other is rater for "Altitude up to PL09564".
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Fortran: You shoot yourself in each toe, iteratively, until you run
out of toes, then you read in the next foot and repeat. If you run
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wrote:

Hahahahahahaha! Form the PLeiostene period.
For a large database "replace all" is fine but chancy.
For as few changes as were in there, the guy should have stepped through them one at a time.
Still better than the old chinese translation motherboard manuals used to be.
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------080806080809090802000700 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit
A firm I worked for in the 90's wrote specifications for PUBLIC SAFETY agencies. Somehow the proofreader's Word spellchecker program decided to replace PUBLIC with PUBIC throughout the document. Worse yet, the document was used as a basis for some other clients work.
JackShephard wrote:

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Joe Leikhim K4SAT
"The RFI-EMI-GUY"©
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On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 20:59:10 -0400, **THE-RFI-EMI-GUY**

You're "that top post guy".
You forgot the apostrophe in "client's", dope.
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message wrote:

Aaah, but it might have been " clients' "
John
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On Thu, 07 Jun 2007 21:01:25 -0700, JackShephard

And you forgot the hyphen in the compound modifier "top-post" and apparently never learned where to place commas in relation to quotation marks, moron.
HTH. HAND.
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wrote:

I agree about "top-post", but you'd better check up on the differences between the US and the UK in punctuation conventions concerning quotation marks, Kevin. Although I live in the US, I have adopted the UK convention myself. It's more logical than our standard.
Bill
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On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 20:30:27 -0400, Bill McCray

I agree. I do the same thing. In all the years I've been posting in alt.usage.english and alt.english.usage no one's ever commented on this being wrong or different.
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Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
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tony cooper wrote:

Either they have you killfiled, or they're so distracted by your inconsistent use of whitespace after periods ("full stops" to the non-native English speakers) that
OHHH!!!! SHINEY!!!!
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Nothing inconsistent about my use of periods. Bang the thumb twice on the spacebar after the period at the end of a sentence. Conditioned response to learning to type in high school on a manual typewriter.
No space after the mark in a newsgroup name. Nor should there be.
Periods are also a "full stop" to a native English speaker if that native English speaker happens to be from the UK.
OBaeu: What is the mark called in a newsgroup name? It's read out as alt dot english dot usage, but is there a name for it other than "dot"?
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Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
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No cluons were harmed when tony cooper wrote:

Fred. As in, "At this company, you can name your salary. I've named mine 'Fred'."
Or maybe subcategory sepatator.
Mark Edwards
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Handful of straw! HANDFUL OF STRAW!
Thanks, Don
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When the English get all smug about how we spell color wrong or pronounce aluminum wrong or don't know how to use "shall" and "will" properly I just want to punch their smarmy English teeth down their condescending English throats.
But when it comes to punctuating in the proximity of quotation marks, they've got it right and I cheerfully defected to the enemy years ago.
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- Doctroid Doctroid Holmes
It's too confused to make sense, so let's make nonsense.
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That's weird cos I get the same reaction when people generalise wildly by lumping all of us in with 'the English'. Please rephrase. "When an English person ..." or "When a person from England ..." will do nicely.
By the way, I don't imagine anyone's really ever told you that you pronounce 'aluminum' wrong or indeed that you spell 'color' wrong. What other pronunciation or spelling is there? Of course, you do spell 'aluminium' and 'colour' wrong but that's not important right now! ;c)
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That's weird because I have no recollection of ever having lumped "all of you", whoever that plural you might be (I seem not to be very successful at reading your mind this morning) in with "the English".

Your lack of imagination is not my problem.
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- Doctroid Doctroid Holmes
It's too confused to make sense, so let's make nonsense.
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Doctroid wrote:

^^^^^^^ whomever

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wrote:

Wrong. I'm sure the kind folks in a.u.e can explain why. Or the unkind ones.
BW
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"whomsoever"?
Dave
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It's not the clock that slows the hour The definition's plain for anyone to see
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David DeLaney wrote:

Wrong again. The relative pronoun is in the nominative (or subjective) case, and therefore "whoever", because it's the subject (or predicate nominative, if you think of the clause as inverted) of the dependent clause in which it appears: "whoever that plural you might be." The entire clause is a noun clause in apposition to (or modifying) "all of you".
The general rule, of which this is an instance, is that the relative pronoun "who" takes its case form from the clause in which it appears, without regard to how that clause is used in the sentence as a whole. Hence:
1. Give it to whoever finishes first.
but
2. Give it to whomever you select.
Lots of people use "whoever" in the second example, even though it's technically incorrect, but there's no justification (aside from ignorance) for "whoever" in the first.
--
Bob Lieblich
To whom it's all perfectly clear (except when it isn't)
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Robert Lieblich wrote:

Now I'm wrong. It's "whomever" "whomever" "whomever" in the first that is inexcusable. Pardon me while I moisten a noodle for some self-flagellation.
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