I'm Stuck: Auto Lock Problem (With URL for Pics!)

You're lucky. Automakers LOVE rivets in door assemblys.
Bolt them. To rivet them you need a large riveter not the little inexpensive ones available in all the hardware stores. Use Grade 8 i.e. six ' marks on on the head, hardware if you want.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
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If the lock will turn back to the lock position normally then your problem is in the lock cylinder assembly.
You may have a wafer which is a little bent. Not being able to turn back to accessory usually indicates that something in the lock cylinder is not lining up properly. The sidebar in the lock and the corresponding groove in the cylinder wears with use on the side associated with turning toward "On" making the lock a little sloppy and therefore more tolerant when a wafer is not perfectly lined up but the lock is not turned to accessory nearly as often so the lock is less tolerant when turning that direction. To get the key out. Try gently turning slightly side to side while simultaneously wiggling the key vertically in the keyway. Using some light oil in the keyway would likely help too.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
You're right it will usually be a popalock car opening or tow service that shows up. Not to say that SOME people who work for those kinds of services are not highly competent at what they do before somebody like Marty the tow truck driver gets offended and accuses me of being an elitist snob SOB.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
I doubt you'll have much problem. Common sense and looking at the marks or lack thereof they left on the parts should help you out.
And the bolts for one of the
It's probably just a light thread locker. Orange or Blue in color? You don't really have to reapply it but if you want to it's a couple bucks a tube from any auto parts store. Nail polish or plain old paint on the treads will also lock them in place when dry.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
your POINT? the IGNITION LOCK can STILL be out of park, as far as ITS concerned.. thats ANOTHER thing ENTIRELY.
And I also tried turning the steering wheel to both extremes, to see if
this a tilt wheel? there is a lot of mechanism in there and something could have slipped a bit little adjusting needed maybe... PLUS, are you running a HIGH amp, audio amp through the ignition switch DIRECT?
--Shiva--
Reply to
--Shiva--
First of all you need to learn to read a thread. I never claimed 23 years experience just like I never said most of the other things you have attributed to me.
WD-40 does not gum up anything. The dust that clings to it MIGHT, somewhat, in time as with any light oil, however as everyone else with even the slightest grasp of the obvious has already realized the OVERRIDING CONCERN is removing the key.
I'm not going to get into a which lubricant is best debate since it's been done to death and there will always be as many opinions as there are products.
Of course you simply state your opinion backed up by nothing whatever and fail to even bother to make any suggestion of your own. Which is almost certainly for the best.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
Which of course never happens because the coating is VERY THIN. Much less than the tolerances in the lock.In reality on an older lock a liberal dousing with the stuff will actually INCREASE effective tolerances because it will wash out accumulated dirt and debris.
It doesn't take a CML to read
Good luck getting the graphite in with the key in place......
Use WD-40 on your boat motors........ And no apparently you don't
So far I wouldn't take your word for anything. You don't even know enough to charge what your time is worth, once again that statement assumes you are any good, a big assumption. Also of note most locks don't need ANY lubricant. I have seen more Ford locks fail due to the gummed up factory grease than any other cause.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
You see.......... there you go making rediculous presumptions. I worked in Chicago as a Locksmith for 12 years, 2 years in South Carolina and in Australia since 1986. You can share stories about Grandad till your hearts content.... but that will still not make WD-40 anything other than a water displacement formula designed to displace water from boat motors and other items subject to the weather. If it leaves a residual effect it is not designed for parts with fits and tolerances. Many, many things are used wrongly in our daily lives............. the wise move is to learn enough to make changes when better options become available. CRC, for example, is purely a spray lubricant that lubricates metal parts and leaves no residual water protection. It does displace water but it doesn't coat the item.... WD-40 acts as a lubricant for a short time up and until the lubricant has evaporated and the residual is all that is left. I'm guessing that you both are aware of the fits and tolerances of incremented pins in their brass(mostly) chambers?? Can a build up of sticky resin really be a good thing. Is this just a case of your attempts at improving your call-out perdentages for the sake of sticky and poorly performing locks??.. or is it just a case of old dog-new tricks syndrome?? For years locksmiths used slim-jims to open most cars in the USA............... police still try. Do you?
mechanisms...
Reply to
nice2cu
He can't grasp the concept that something can displace water and act as a lubricant. It isn't surprising because he can't grasp the concept of a difference between a regular and after midnight rate or keep up with who has posted what. Hell he probably doesn't even know where his own keys are right this second. Hey wait a minute.......where are my keys................LOL.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
I would plan on replacing the cylinder anyway unless there is something obviously wrong with that key. Something is causing it to bind the key in place. Unless that's corrected you are going to need another cylinder or you'll have the same problem next time you put the key in. And yes there is a real chance of bending a wafer so that the lock will no longer work, one may already be bent. Your problem could also be caused by excessive dirt and debris and/or wear in the lock, but usually those problems cause a lock that won't turn not one that retains the key.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
Are you really this dense or are you trolling us? ALL lubricants leave a residual effect. That's where the lubrication comes from.
It still leaves a residual effect or there would be no lubricant effect after use.
Do you think before you post? Of course it does. Once again if it didn't THERE WOULD BE NO LUBRICATION RESULTING FROM ITS USE. An example of something which by design does not coat the item it's used on i.e. leave residue is brake cleaner. It also has no lubricant properties.
Which still provides some lubrication while not attracting as much dust.
No. But it's irrelevant since WD-40 leaves no such thing.
Is this just a case of your attempts at improving your call-out
That's because for years slim jims worked well and without damage. Designs change. There are still cars on the road where a slim jim works great. Most of them are decades old and they are fewer and fewer in number.
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
According to the manufacturer, WD-40:
a.. CLEANS: WD-40 gets under dirt, marks and grease making it easy to wipe away. It also dissolves adhesives, allowing easy removal of labels, tape, and stickers
b.. DISPLACES MOISTURE: Because WD-40 displaces moisture, it quickly dries out electrical systems to eliminate moisture-induced short circuits. Turn the power off before you spray
c.. PENETRATES: WD-40 loosens rust-to-metal bonds and frees stuck, frozen or rusted metal parts
d.. LUBRICATES: WD-40's lubricating ingredients are widely dispersed and hold firmly to all moving parts
e.. PROTECTS: WD-40 protects metal surfaces with corrosion-resistant ingredients to shield against moisture and other corrosive elements Interesting history of WD-40 from same site:
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Reply to
Aegis
is CRC available thru my suppliers? no.. Could I get it somewhere? probably..
how is it at removing dirt from ignition locks?
how cold and wet can it stand?
TFE (think thats the name) or Tri Flo is a lubricant that is better in SOME circumstances than WD 40. but I got a lot of humidity and DIRTY air in my area that it is sufficient to keep some exterior building locks cleaned out. --Shiva--
Reply to
--Shiva--
I'm sorry .... I won't go on pretending you're a locksmith. It's not worth my time to continue trying to make a point here. If you can't put your fricken ego aside for 2 minutes and actually learn something then you are a bloody half-wit. I can now see why you charge so much when you actually get work................... jobs are probably far and few between. I hope you bathe your kids in WD-40 for all I care. Whn ever you learn to master the art of reading, things will probably become much clearer for you............... good luck in all your endeavours.
Reply to
nice2cu
LOL I thought you were pretending to be one.
It's not worth
I'm deeply wounded. You've already made it clear your time isn't worth much.
If you can't put your
You've already lost the whole argument many times over so it's understandable you would resort to name calling rather than address any specific point. It's your best course of action at this point. Congratulations for realizing that.
I can now see why you charge so much
Because I have a life and want to have the time to live it.
So if that were the case is it a bad thing for me to work half as much as you and make the same money?
I hope you
There you go again. I didn't say anything about using the stuff as a homeopathic remedy. I have no opinion on that. I do on the other hand think you should learn to read and comprehend. Fat chance that will happen I know.
What would you know of the art of reading? You can't even figure out what poster to respond to or who said what. On top of that you are a top poster. Try to stop doing that. It's difficult enough for anyone to figure out what you are babbling about at any given time.
Well I know you have to go. There is a drunk with no money waiting to stiff you on your cheap labor.
LOL
Reply to
Putyourspamhere
I would agree that Armor All might not be a lubricant of first choice, but there is a reason motorcyclists don't use it on their seats. It meets the definition of lubricant if it reduces friction.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf
Or not if the reason the key won't turn back has nothing to do with the lock cylinder key relationship. As someone earlier suggested the transmission interlock may be suspect.
Reply to
Roger Shoaf

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