which material

quel matériau protège le nez de la navette spatial de l'échauffement se produisant lors de la rentrée dans l'atmosphère?

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (wuying) wrote:

Vous obtiendrez beaucoup de réponses en posant la question en anglais. Je vous laisse le plaisir de la traduction et de la rédaction....
Pour vous aider à trouver une réponse facile par vous-même:
essayez "shuttle nose cone material" avec www.google.com
J.J.
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jacques jedwab wrote:

Or use fr.sci.*
Michael Dahms
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wrote:

I should probably not recommend the fr.sci.* line of NG: I have never seen such restrictive set of charter guidelines. Intentions are commendable, but "l'enfer est aussi pavé des meilleures intentions".
J.J.
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Translation: What material protects the nose of a space ship against the heat of re-entry.
Dwayne
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Dwayne wrote:

The Space Shuttle nose is an "Advanced Carbon-carbon" laid up of two dimensional carbon fiber in a carbon matrix and the surface layers of this has been converted/infiltrated to/with Silicon Carbide. The Silicon Carbide protects against oxidation by converting part of itself into viscous SiO2. LTV developed the process in the late 1960's and early 1970's.
The space shuttle nose is blunt because that keeps the heating rate down, and that is vital because there is an upper limit to the protection of the SiC materials.
It can be thought of as a variation of the SiC type heating elements, the prototype was perhaps called something like Glowbar. They could be operated a long time in air at temperatures over 2000F.
The reentry trajectory of the Space Shuttle is adjested to keep the nosetip within an acceptible temperature range. And similar remarks relate to the wing leading edges. The limiting temperature on Shuttle reentry could be limited by either the wing leading edge or the nosetip, and this is beyond my experience.
Lots more detailed information can be attained by a google search on "Space Shuttle Thermal Protection Materials" or substitute "Nosecone" or substitute "wing leading edge". After the recent shuttle loss, there are even more reports on the carbon/carbon materials used.
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"wuying" wrote in message

Il n'y a aucun matériel. Béryllium (Galileo) Norcoat Liège (bois poudre plus epoxy) (Huygens, Beagle 2) et beaucoup d'autres matériaux ont été employés. Il dépend de l'énergie de l'orbite d'entrée.
-James Garry (ex of Interim HoToL, ex of Huygens, ex of Beagle 2)
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X(
Bah! Non, Galileo n'utilize pas Beryllium (mes apologie), c'etait une resine phenolique.
C'etait le "Mercury" navette , pas Galileo, où le Berylliumn a été employé (pas sur le nez, mais sur la base, comme un 'heat sink' pas un 'ablator')
-James Garry (sans caffeine)
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