Britain's answer to knife crime

I can believe that though it's not a case in the UK yet that I'm aware of. My chainsaw has proved quite useful and hasn't bitten me but I treat it with the respect it deserves. A guy I know said we do have some similar regulations such as the abrasive wheel regulations which means he has to change the wheel on his workers angle grinders as he has done the abrasive wheel safety course. His point though was that anyone can go down the local DIY shop and get a 9" angle grinder and use it with no training. Hopefully they don't end up in A&E, affectionately known as the Black & Decker ward.
Reply to
David Billington
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If the OSHA/safety guys ever watched me running a chainsaw they would have a coronary on the spot. The first thing I did on my new saw (30 years ago) was take the STUPID shield off the tip. The tip of a chainsaw is what makes it SO useful, but you also give it the up most respect. Ground all the *&^@# anti-kick tooth nubs off my electric chainsaw too.
I would say I use the top of the blade 1/3 of the time and the bottom 2/3. Especially while limbing the smaller stuff.
Always take a break when you get tired, that is when I am most likely to do something stupid or not have the stamina to make the saw obey...
Reply to
Leon Fisk
tend to ally
Think of Kalifornia :-)
Just because these things come up, doesn't mean that they have any significant effect in the grand scheme of things. By comparison, there was a report on the BBC website today that 50% of teachers think that junior schools are too safe and that paying too much attention to safety harms the kids' ability to think for themselves. There is intelligence mixed in with the lunacy.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
I use a 4' Sandvik bucksaw.had it for about 25 years now, doesn't get used that often here in suburbia, but it's better than any electric chainsaw. Dad used to sell Jonsered back in the era when they made descent chainsaws.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
And don't even think of using it after six or more "Daddy Pops" Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
Here is one to go with it:
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Reply to
Michael Koblic
Hey, back in the 60's as a pre-teen I carried a knife. One that I had bought with my own pocket money in an ironmongers. How the hell else were you expected to sharpen your school pencils and whittle bits of wood? :-|
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
I still carry one. I don't understand how a grown man can make his way through life without a good pocket knife.
On two occasions, I've forgotten I had it as I was about to board a plane. Fortunately the security people recognized that my little knives were just an oversight on my part and they allowed me to go buy an envelope and some stamps, and mail it to myself at home. (My checked luggage was already on the plane.) I wouldn't let a bone-handled Case or a Buck Cadet get away. I would have stayed home instead.
-- Ed Huntress
Reply to
Ed Huntress
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85 out of 1000 is a problem in their eyes? Seems when I was growing up, just about everyone had a knife.
I've pretty much carried a knife all my life... though admittedly the Leatherman I've carried for the last 7 years might qualify as a "knife" only on a technicality... but I'd be naked without it.
"The one that got away" was a Buck engraved with name, unit, dates of service, I got when I left the 3d ACR. Actually, I didn't "lose" it so much as it was stolen. :-(
Reply to
Steve Ackman
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I carried Camilus electrician's knives most of my life, from the start of junior high school, on. I made several flights with one in my pocket, as well. I simply opened both blades and let them see they were barely sharp enough to strip wire, wile telling them I used them every day in my work to strip wire, and as screwdrivers. They just said, Ok, and handed it back to me.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Have you carried one on a flight since 2001? I always carry a pcket knife, except when flying...
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
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!978, going through security in the nations capitol, I had two questionable items in my brief case (besides my photo card which allowed me access to any area on the airport including the bonded storage for in flight refreshments). One was a multi point screwdriver(~1 1/2" long bits) and a 12V., ice pick like, circuit tracing probe. Guess which was confiscated as being on the prohibited list, while the other was permitted since it was classed as "test equipment". OTOH, a couple years latter, I was called in to regional office during a site visit after a shopping expedition. On approaching the check in screening point, wearing the above mentioned photo card, I made the comment - "You won't believe what is in that brief case" (I was prepared to have them ask the airport manager to hold it till I came back the next week for my vehicle), The response was "In that case I won't look at the X-Ray! Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
I really would rather not ;)
Reply to
Wes
Or use a broken bottle.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
That's probably to discourage people from working. Germany likes to have the highest unemployment rate of any place with tap water that's safe to drink.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
"Michael A. Terrell" wrote in rec.crafts.metalworking:
To quote one of Alistair MacLean's characters (in the book "Bear Island") "I've often found a bottle of Scotch to be a great leveller".
The character had just knocked out one of the villians by clobbering him with a full bottle...
Reply to
RAM³
Indeed. Or a large nut on a 6" piece of rope, or a ......
Lots of ways to bash, slash, gash and stash people.
None of which are "weapons"
Gunner
"Lenin called them "useful idiots," those people living in liberal democracies who by giving moral and material support to a totalitarian ideology in effect were braiding the rope that would hang them. Why people who enjoyed freedom and prosperity worked passionately to destroy both is a fascinating question, one still with us today. Now the useful idiots can be found in the chorus of appeasement, reflexive anti-Americanism, and sentimental idealism trying to inhibit the necessary responses to another freedom-hating ideology, radical Islam"
Bruce C. Thornton, a professor of Classics at American University of Cal State Fresno
Reply to
Gunner Asch
You forgot 'Staple' with an 'Arrow T-75'. ;-)
I had pretty good results using my can on some punk, too. Its been over three years since I took him down after he assaulted me, and people still laugh when his name is mentioned. They still call him 'Pretzel Boy', because I had him on his knees on the ground with his left arm twisted behind his back, and I was leaning down to cut off his air. It was a fair fight though. He was one third my age, six inches taller, and thought he was the meanest SOB in North Central Florida. He just didn't count on an old man taking him down, in front of his little group of thugs. :)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
That's ok, as long as he doesn't waste a bottle of good Scotch. :)
A hot soldering iron does a pretty good job, too, if you make sure to burn a hole in something they might miss. I had a drunk barge into my room in the barracks one evening, and threaten me. I asked him to leave, and he started screaming for me to stop working on someone's stereo, and give him my tools, then yelled, Give me that !@#$%^&* soldering iron, right now! I asked, This one? Then I lunged at him, and missed him by less than an inch. He did a standing broad jump, backwards into my wall locker, and slammed his head into it. Funny thing is, he never came back to bother me after that. :)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
I have yet to demonstrate how I remove unwanted "growths" from the vicinity of my front door using a gas powered "weed whacker" The young lady who wanted me to buy an alarm system called the local constabulary after I offered to show her my "staffordshire" alarm system (resident puppy is a Bichon Frise) and Winchester "anti theft equipment". Apparently she needed help in the laundry department. The responding officer was totally amused. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller

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