Metalworking content

Got a new, oversize y axis gib for my bridgeport yesterday. Fitted it,
cut the notch for the gib adjusting screw, drilled for oiling, and it's
working. Now working on cleaning the X axis scale, already did the Y.
I'd like to paint it ( the mill), but the thought of all the dust from
sanding the thick epoxy paint don't sound like fun. Anyone know if those
oscillating head tools scrape paint very well? I need an excuse to give
SWMBO why I need one. If I get permission, I'm gonna get the top of the
line Bosch.
Reply to
Steve Walker
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Just uploaded some pix to mwdropbox.com.
Solid1 and solid2 (JPG format).
If I was rich, I'd be doing this for recreation, it's my craft, and it's metalworking, but for now, I work to get paid.
Reply to
Steve Walker
Did you blue it up and scrape away material from the middle area so that the only surface in contact is an inch or two at each end ?
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
Nice to see real metalworking.
Nice work! But I'll bet that Steve downsizes those images. They are way oversized. 2560x1920 is massive overkill.
And both are all lower case names except for the extension, FWIW. If you're going to put one of them at the beginning of a sentence, put it in double quotes to resist the temptation to capitalize it.
That's O.K. It is nice work anyway. CNC machine did it?
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Damn. More work. I wondered why the one I replaced was worn only on the ends. (the gib screw slot was broken)
Reply to
Steve Walker
Damn, Sam, That's what it am. It's a subcontracted government job, they didn't want to build a deep draw die for just 2 pieces.
I don't know who originally said it, but "you are that......damn......good!"
Reply to
Steve Walker
Yeah, they came from work's camera, many more MP than mine. My camera images are usually about 750K in size. Also explains the upper case file extension, my camera is lower case. I didn't check anything before uploading.
No, metal chisel, stones, and sandpaper.
Spoiler alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Seriously, yes, a Mazak Nexus vertical.
Reply to
Steve Walker
Thanks, I had a pretty strong hunch, because of the notch area...
--that is a relatively large, thin-walled piece, the material alone representing a significant cost--it takes many years of skill and accumulated specialty knowledge to sucessfully manufacture items of this nature out of raw stock..
Nice work...

Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
Works well, just make sure you still have a good amount of contact area at both extreme ends of travel if the gib is longer than other dovetail (resulting in overhang)
While this does not affect accuracy at first, it allows for the gib to be re-adjusted as it wears, due to the fact that most wear occurs at the ends; once it's finally worn down to the point where there is full contact along it's entire length, scrape away the middle area once more...if you do not, then eventually what happens is you will only have contact in the middle area, further tightening of the gib at this juncture, causing the mating dovetail to undergo excessive wear at the mid-travel area.
Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
Which is why those of us who either fix machines, or regularly have them fixed..put the vise on the table in 3 locations. Right, Middle, Left.
Using them for a year or s in each location tends to equalize the wear across the full travel over time.
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
Nice big pile of chips at the end of the cycle eh?

Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
That's all you have to say about the parts? Not, how did you hold it? What problems do you encounter machining a part like that, etc? Think you could make that part Gummer? What would you machine first? What do you think would be problem areas? No... fuck all that: you want to make some dumb ass comment on chips. You are incapable of learning precision machining. Go drink some more Mountain Dew and keep poisoning yourself, dickhead.
Reply to
Jonathan Banquer
[ ... ]
Well ... the cleaning and checking of the machines is complete. Most of the machines came out fine -- after de-surface-rusting and re-lubing. The drill press pops the GFI as soon as it starts to rotate. Likely water in the small VFD mounted on it, as the motor is well sealed. I can't dig into that to fix it until the walls are re-insulated and re-drywalled. (Adding outlets while I am about it. :-)
Lots of tool holders (30-taper and 40-taper as well as Aloris style) need de-rusting -- or replacement. All the end mill sets (normal, two angles of dovetail, and Woodruff key cutters) will need to be replaced, as well as drill bits -- but waiting about ordering these until I have a place to put them.
Currently waiting through paperwork to get the check from the insurance company turned into cash to pay people. Had to get it signed by the credit union, and the mortgage company wants to hold onto it and handle disbursements themselves.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
At least you are making some progress. Keep us informed, and let us know if you need to replace the computer you used for CNC. I'm sure something can be found, unless you want to spring for a new, industrial grade motheboard with EISA slots.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell

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