OT - Electric Chainsaws Any Good?

Was wondering if an electric chainsaw would be worthwhile for cutting logs
into fireplace length (power is nearby). My old gas saw is cranky and a
little worn out so need a replacement but the allure of less noise and no
gas/fumes/hard to start etc. seems compelling.
Any suggestions appreciated...............
Laurie Forbes
Reply to
Laurie Forbes
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Electric chain saws do work, but are slower than the gas powered ones.
For small diameter wood I use a circular saw that I made. Just a 10 inch dia. blade on a belt driven mandrel. 1.5 hp motor. No tilt or blade height adjustment. It is not all that quiet ( I wear ear muffs ), but quicker than a chain saw for small diameter stuff.
Dan Laurie Forbes wrote:
Reply to
dcaster
I have a small one for "light" trimming which works well for green wood up to about 6 inch dia.
I've found that with dry wood, it doesn't seem to work nearly as well. But it is quiet and extremely convenient!
Ace
Reply to
Ace
I do use a chainsaw occasionally, but not enough to make it worthwhile to buy one. Much more economical to rent one from United Rentals ($20 for 4 hours) when I need it. They keep it maintained, fueled, etc and the saws they have are much better than any I could afford to buy. All my garden tools are electric (lawn mower, weed wacker, rototiller) so the effort of keeping gas and oil around for a tool I use maybe twice a year isn't worth it. My point is that you might be better off renting a better gas saw than buying a new electric one.
Reply to
woodworker88
I've used an electric chain saw for years as a second saw, and as long as its sharp it will cut thru anything in the blade range. and yes its slower, but you get what you pay for. And is handy to just plug in and go. gary
Reply to
Gary Owens
I purchased a Stihl E20 eleven years ago...don't know if they are still made, but mine is every bit as strong a cutter as my Stihl 026. It pulls 15 amps.
F46
Reply to
f46
Laurie I'd say get ye to the saw shop. Ask the experts and try one out. Avoid the warehouse stores. I use one for limbing and such and to do a bit of trimming in the woodshed if some pieces are a bit to big for the stove. I would not even consider using it for any large amount of work. What is your definition of a log? Around here it is something on the order of 30-40" in diameter. An electric saw ain't gonna do it on something like that. lg no neat sig line
Reply to
larry g
I borrow my neighbor's electric on the rare occasion I need a chain saw. It works OK. It is possible to infer you are female, just by looking at your first name "Laurie" and so I will add, make sure when you're looking at one, that your hands are big enough to reach both the trigger and the little ~!@#$%^&*() button they make you push. My neighbor (a 75YO woman) does not have hands big enough, so when she has to cut up fallen branches, etc. she calls me. I figure fair enough, she lets me borrow the saw anytime I want.
Best way to own a chainsaw is to not own one, to have a neighbor who does. Get the chain sharpened occasionally, be the one to run for bar oil, always bring it back when you say and they'll happily loan it to you and then you don't have to store it! (ref. earlier threads on insufficient shop space ...)
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
"Grant Erwin" wrote: (clip) Best way to own a chainsaw is to not own one, to have a neighbor who does. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ So your advice is, talk your neighbor into buying a chain saw?
Electric chain saws are very convenient, quiet and smoke-free. You can run one at night without waking the neighbors--you can run one in the garage without smelling the place up. They vary widely in price and quality. A good professional Stihl will perform just like a gasoline-powered saw, and will cost just as much. A little plug-in Remington won't do much work, and probably won't last long. For your needs, something in between will probably be the best choice.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Thanks to all for their helpful suggestions.
The "logs" I work with are pretty small stuff (up to about 8") and are aspen poplar so should be pretty easy to cut, even for an electric saw I hope. Volume of cutting isn't all that large either.
After reviewing everyone's comments, I think I'll try it........
BTW, I'm of the male persuasion so don't let the name mislead or entice you :)
Laurie Forbes
Reply to
Laurie Forbes
Laurie, I found a $40 Remington 14" electric chainsaw at Home Despot a decade ago and bought it. I do so little sawing that I'm still on the same chain and gallon of oil, but the quiet little beast still keeps on tickin' for me. I've cut maybe a cord worth of wood in all that time so it has definitely paid for itself.
If you have much wood to cut, you'll have to weigh the higher cost and better durability of a new gas model against the cheaper, shorter-lived electric model.
If I were cutting a couple cords a year, I'd definitely buy a good gas model. Since I'm not, the little electric works nicely.
Before you buy a new one, talk with the local chainsaw repairman. He might be able to put (and keep) yours in shape for a lot less money and hassle.
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Reply to
Larry Jaques
| Was wondering if an electric chainsaw would be worthwhile for cutting logs | into fireplace length (power is nearby). My old gas saw is cranky and a | little worn out so need a replacement but the allure of less noise and no | gas/fumes/hard to start etc. seems compelling. | | Any suggestions appreciated............... | | Laurie Forbes
I have a good friend who's a very good carpenter and he uses one a lot. Great for trimming framing out in situ. I especially liked its use one day while sitting out on the end of a 4 by 14 piece of parallam beam trimming the end off at a cant. Kinda scary leaning over and cutting, but it was the only thing that would have done the job. I've seen roofers use one to cut the plywood to fit. He laid the wood down, did a visual of where the cut should be and zipped through it in place. Beat the hell out of a worm drive, and he didn't have to bend over near as much. I can't recall if that one was gas or electric, though.
Reply to
carl mciver
My father in law has one that just won't die. He put in a sprinkler system in his yard with one by cutting two rows through the grass and dirt for each pipe. It was down right funny to watch. He also wires it to the end of a swimming pool pole to cut branches off way up in the trees.
Reply to
Sunworshipper
Electric chain saws are convenient, so long as you can reach your cutting area with a cord, but they're for cutting lighter limbs, I'd say up to about 3" or so. You can cut bigger diameters, but you'll notice a lack of power and extra wear and tear when cutting larger wood. They're also lightweight and easy to handle. I had a Homelite and it was a fair saw, but the parts were very expensive. For this reason, I would buy a different brand next time.
Gary Brady Austin, TX
Reply to
Gary Brady
I bet he doesn't live here in New England....That saw would have been toasted by rocks before it went four inches.
The reason Horace Greely said "Go west young man" was because he was telling them to get away from the (expletive deleted)s rock laden New England farmlands.
And FWIW, I've had a 16" McCullough electric chain saw for about ten years and it's served me well for yard work and making firewood out of small trees, up to about 8" diameter. A 100 foot cord puts it anywhere on my lot. Very convenient.
Jeff (In Red Sox Country)
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
Leo, I've checked Stihl's web site and they do not list an electric under their "professional" category. They do however list three electrics under a separate category, the MS 140, 180C and 220Q. Are either of those what you are referring to??
Laurie Forbes
Reply to
Laurie Forbes
for what it's worth, I have the Sthil 220Q with a 20 inch bar - it's a great saw. I got it after running through a dozen sears and poulon electric saws (the best lasted about 45 minutes, the worst was broken out of the box), all failed due to a nylon gear stripping off of a steel shaft. the Sthil is 20X the price, but it has lasted -
Reply to
william_b_noble
I have a Stihl 290 with a 20" bar for serious cutting plus a pair of Remington Electric saws (10" and 14" bars) for lighter stuff. Electric saws work great for 2"-3", ok at 4" to 6", pretty wimpy at 8". They are also much safer (if anything is!) for pruning while working off of a ladder. No need to climb a ladder with a running saw!
Keep in mind that the Remington saws are designed to last for about 6 hours of actual cutting time. The gear reduction is actually a nylon gear. I have picked up several at garage sales for $1, usually have a blown up aramature.
Laurie Forbes wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
agree on the little saws - the Sthil that I have though will cut through 36 inch or more stumps (because that's how I use it, to split them in half to make bowl blanks, etc), and it will do it in rip or cross cut mode and not complain - and it won't quit after 6 hours either.... oddly the stihl has a lower horsepower rated motor than the cheaper saws that don't last as long - I guess those Sthil horses are better bred or something.
Reply to
william_b_noble

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