OT My second electric bike

https://www.flickr.com/photos/27532210@N04/
Assuming it works... The structure holding the drill is two pieces of aluminum flatbar and eight bolts. Bought a long, mountain bike seat post
to help reinforce the aluminum tube. Besides being longer than usual, the seatpost is 2/10 of a millimeter greater diameter than it's supposed to be, it's a very snug fit into the shaft. The simplicity and functionality of the drill holder is hugely better than the first bike. Barely tightening the bolts and it's a very sturdy fit. Some superglue might be added where the flatbar meets the tube, and maybe some hot melt glue to the drill handle area.
Next and last is making the trigger controller. On eBay, somebody wraps a bike handgrip cable around the drill and then around the trigger. But it might be done simply by connecting the cable sleeve to the trigger and securing the end of the cable just beyond the trigger (towards the back of the drill).
Someday, adding a spring to the drive train would be useful. As is, power must be engaged carefully.
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Pictures have been added. So far, so so. Have taken it around the block a few times, and taken it about 2 miles to and from the store. The DCD995 gearcase makes more noise than the DCD780. It's more powerful and top speed is higher. The gearcase seems to get warm easily. I'm using Park Tool grease in the gearcase. Strangely, there seems to be no slapping/banging against the freewheel pawls when throttle is applied. This time I'm using a derailer for the chain tensioner instead of using a homemade semi-rigid chain tensioner. But I don't understand how that stops the banging when the sprocket catches up to the wheel speed. Maybe it has something to do with the brushless motor. Whatever, if it is as it seems to be, that's great. Still to be determined is top speed, miles per amp hour, and durability.
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On Thu, 5 May 2016 03:05:13 -0000 (UTC), John Doe

Dude, you are almost at the same level as Skybuck Flying.
You could have saved pennies in a piggy bank and gotten together enough for a hub motor AND a battery by now.
You'll be lucky to get a 200 foot range with that at 3 miles an hour.
An old 50s style automotive generator configured as a motor would do better. I made a go-cart with one back in '72.
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On Thu, 5 May 2016 03:05:13 -0000 (UTC), John Doe

You should try whale oil.
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On Thu, 5 May 2016 07:40:28 -0000 (UTC), John Doe
You are just pissed because I properly pegged you as being even more stupid than the group invading Skybuck idiot is.
What you did is not a metalworking craft, nor is it electronics, dipshit. Go the fuck away, boy.
Nor is it a viable method of propulsion for even a single human.
You are so stupid, you likely do not even know what a sun gear is.
And you are a stupid Usenet top posting retard, AND you are a stupid Usenet group adding dumbfuck.
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On Fri, 10 Jun 2016 13:09:41 -0000 (UTC), John Doe

I'm writing a magazine article about cordless power tools. I'd like to use one of your photos (or maybe you'd like to shoot one just for the article) and a few lines about your experience. I need it by early next week.
Interested? If so, send me an email to my business email address, which is snipped-for-privacy@techgenmedia.com
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)&*Version*=1&*entries*=0
I housed the shunt in a plastic conduit tee fitting. The separate ground power and sense leads are necessary. It does NOT read reversed current.
--jsw
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On Fri, 10 Jun 2016 16:05:41 -0000 (UTC) John Doe

Might be pricey as it's Fluke, but there are probably cheaper ones out there. http://en-us.fluke.com/products/clamp-meters/fluke-381-true-rms-clamp-meter.html
https://www.google.com/#q=current+meter+with+remote+display
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http://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/a-look-at-the-uni-t-ut210e/
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I don't think that one has a remote display, though. JD would like to have the display on the handlebars, but does not want to extend the wire on the bike to get there.
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It displays voltage as ##.##V, current to #.##A with decent accuracy, plus power (Volts * Amps) to 0.1W and the accumulated energy in Watt-hours since the last reset. The Watt-hours consumed in a mile, divided by the battery voltage, gives you the Amp-Hours used. http://www.rapidtables.com/convert/electric/wh-to-mah.htm
--jsw
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wrote:

The meter's microcomputer stores the accumulated energy value in nonvolatile memory so it doesn't need to be powered continuously. I plugged mine into the nearly dark solar panel a few minutes ago, without a load, and it still shows 1041Wh from when I discharged a battery through it last winter.
The only real electrical consideration is to be aware that the thin wires to the display are directly connected to the battery and could burn if shorted to each other or the frame. I made the connections at the conduit tee fitting that encloses the shunt with in-line fuseholders similar to these: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
--jsw
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On Fri, 10 Jun 2016 17:29:21 -0000 (UTC), John Doe

The fact that you are oblivious as to this BASIC electronic principle proves you should not be in this group.
BASICS is the group you should be in, and you barely qualify for that one.
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    [ ... ]

    "This group" happens to be two newsgroups. It is cross-posted. The newsgroups header is:
=====================================================================Newsgroups: rec.crafts.metalworking,sci.electronics.design =====================================================================

    He started out discussing this in rec.crafts.metalworking and I don't know whether *he* added sci.electronics.design to the newsgroups list, or whether someone else added it, expecting it to be a better place to get the needed information. If the latter, he may not even have noticed the addition of your newsgroup, just as *you* did not notice rec.crafts.metalworking was part of the cross-posting.
    You could add the basics newsgroup to the Newsgroups header, and result in even more vituperation -- especially from those who do not notice the other newsgroups.
    And -- you could add a "Followup-To: " to the headers, which would make only the replies to your articles go to the named newsgroup(s), and other replies would still be cross-posted as before, so it is a loosing battle.
    Yes, a good shunt down at the motor/battery interface to measure current, and two more leads for the voltage across the motor should allow display of everything he wants. (Actually, three leads would suffice, if done right) But if routed up to the handlebars, while light gauge wire would do nicely to carry the voltage signals up to the meter on the handlebars, I would advise fuses in all wires, in case they get pinched together. (I don't know whether anything is grounded to the frame, but a pinch which cuts through the insulation could get exciting if the wires run along the frame near his thighs.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I tried three leads so I could exchange the shunt connections with a DPDT switch to read current in the Charging direction. The backlight draws enough current to significantly offset the sensed shunt voltage, which is only 75mV full scale, and 75uV at 0.1 Amp. It really needs separate power and sense wires.
--jsw
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On 6/10/2016 9:56 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

Yes, the shunt has to have a separate high current path with no terminals in common with the sense leads, but also the meter power should not run on the sense wires to limit the meter reading its own power draw since the sense voltages are so small. When I looked at the diagrams for the various modes of wiring none show sharing of the sense and meter power leads.
--

Rick C

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I didn't have a 3PDT switch handy to try, so the DPDT proved the concept despite the sense voltage error. A 3PDT switch would cost about as much as a second meter anyway. Separate meters for charge and discharge will totalize the energy in and out of the battery separately while a single meter with a reversing switch will add them together, which isn't very useful.
I settled on a 100A Bayite meter to monitor discharge and a 20A one to monitor charge. The 100A one is on a long cable so I can see how much battery power the inverter's loads draw as I turn them on and off, the 20A one on the charger whose constant output doesn't need watching. Both show the battery voltage. They aren't as informative as the industrial datalogger I installed on an experimental electric vehicle but they are good enough for home projects.
A possible fault condition with the reversing switch is the B- contact open and the meter's operating current trying to pass through the sense leads, which might overload the input clamp diodes. http://www.analog.com/library/analogdialogue/archives/49-10/esd-diodes.html
--jsw
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Gave us:

Of course they do. Where have you been for the last several decades?
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Gave us:

You're an idiot. I have several down in the lab right now and also have current clamps for levels above what the baseline meter can handle.
You are batting -1000, child.
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On Sat, 11 Jun 2016 19:05:34 -0400, DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

ans those current clamps read DC?
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