Wire-rope winding drums

Hi all,
I've looked around (Google, Machinery's Handbook), but can't find the
answer:
I am running an endless wire rope (stainless steel throttle cable, about
1.5mm dia) with a powered wheel ("drum", "capstan", whatever) to drive
it. Now I am sure there are somewhere formulae giving the proper drum
diameter, & size & shape of the groove for a given rope.
Can anyone point me at these?
TIA
Reply to
David R Brooks
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Machinery's Handbook has the information you need. At least in the 20th Edition and earlier. Good luck.
dennis in nca
Reply to
rigger
Check in Machinery's Handbook under Mechanics and Strength of Material (27th edt. page 379)
Andrew
Reply to
AndrewV
My Handbook is the 25th Edn. Has anyone a reference into that? TIA
Reply to
David R Brooks
I have seen cables like that in copiers (I think) Seems they were wrapped around a flat drum with shoulders. They were wrapped at least twice around the spool for less slippage.
Reply to
daniel peterman
I have the 21st and 26th editions. Both have a section on wire rope. In the 26th the groove dimensions are given in a chart on page 360 in the chain section. In the index it is called the "drum score dimensions" or something like that. The chart is not the same as the 21st edition. I believe it's a mistake in the 26th. Anyway, for 3/8" rope, which is the smallest listed in the drum score chart in the 21st ed., the pitch is 7/16" and the radius of the groove is 7/32". So that gives you some idea of what you will want for your 1.5mm stuff. But if you look in the wire rope section of the book you will find all the info you need for drum sizing. The drum diameter is a compromise. The larger drum gives longer rope life and the smaller drum is cheaper, will spin faster, and result in shorter rope life. Look in the index under "wire rope" and you'll see the section pages. ERS
Reply to
Eric R Snow
Next time you get near a carnival, look at the drive mechanism on a Tilt-A-Whirl. It uses an endless cable driven by a two groove capstan and a two groove idler/tensioner. Simple, neat and effective...
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Foster

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