$3 gas is here!

Dave Grayvis wrote:


What??? That's insane.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Ya' can't rebuild it either, You have to replace it with a new engine. (or one with less than 40k.)
But the good news is, They sell the used engines overseas, including the USA.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

They also limit the horsepower a production car can produced. IIRC it's something like 320 bhp. However It's been broken regularly by pretty much all japanese car manufacturers.
Ted Novak TRA#5512 IEAS#75
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writes:

Isn't also against the law to have a car with more then one exterior color in Japan??? BTW, I have never had a car with under 40,000 miles on it.
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Jason Hommrich wrote:

Never heard that one. It makes some sense though, I mean you wouldn't want to confuse tourists and foreign travelers into thinking that You were a taxicab or something.
Most of the vehicles I have owned have had more than one exterior color, although none of them came that way new.
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They were probably imported from Japan :)
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It's not against the law; there's a sort of 'tax' that starts to go up a whole lot once the car reaches about 40,000, though. Once they hit 60,000 miles (100,000 kilometers) the tax is high enough to keep most people from driving them. The tax is based on age, size of engine, and a few other factors. Once they hit the magic 100Km, you may have to pay to get rid of it.
So, while not illegal, it most certainly is discouraged financially. I bet the US car manufacturers would buy a *lot* of politicians to get a law like that passed here <g>.
From an article about buying a car in Japan:
(http://www.globalcompassion.com/buying-car.htm )
"Sixth, and last, "Sha'ken" (mentioned just above) must be paid every two years on older cars. The amount of Sha'ken goes up depending on the size, engine size and age of the vehicle. During the Sha'ken process certain repairs must be made, and it can get very expensive. On the other hand, it helps insure that your vehicle is well maintained, so you're much less likely to have it breakdown in between. However, the fact is that as cars get older, Sha'ken becomes more and more expensive. Eventually, if the car stops running well or reaches a certain age (even though it's still a good car), you may have to pay a fee just to get rid of it. This is the reason why there are so few older cars in Japan. When cars hit about 60,000 kilometers (maybe 40,000 miles), people start to get rid of them. You'll find very few cars on the road with more than 100,000 kilometers (66,000 miles). Many of these used cars are shipped to other countries, like Australia and New Zealand, where people love the endless supply of cheap, slightly used cars from Japan."
--
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On 5 Sep 2005 22:57:44 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Well, taxes [ :-( ] could have been imposed to stabilize the price of gas at the pump. Katrina is short time blip, and a force of nature. The Iraq war is a major long term reason for high oil and gas prices, and is force of the Bush administration.
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Alan Jones wrote:

So the fact that U.S refineries don't have enough capacity to supply the demands of the domestic market has nothing to do with it? You mean if we withdrew all our troops tomorrow the capacity problem would go away?
I find it ironic that people claim we went to war because of oil and then blame oil prices on us going to war. If we went to war for oil, wouldn't that lower the price?
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Who is responsible for this. Can you say reformulated gas. Some of the old refineries could not make it and had to be shut down. So take your pick Bill Clinton who made it law or the tree huggers who pushed for it. You can also thank them for over 20yrs with out a new refinery.
Dennis
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D&JWatkins wrote:

And did I hear it takes upwards of 6 years to get a permit for a new refinery? No wonder no one wants to build one. We need to invest in domestic energy. That means drilling in the ANWR and getting new, modern refineries online in a timely fashion.
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Dave Lyle wrote:

Yep, not to mention all the NIMBYs who want gas but think refineries should be in someone else's city/county/state.

Amen!
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

There's plenty of waste land in this country to put a refinery, or 20. Problem is there is no pool of talent sitting in the waste land to run the thing. No people, no refinery. Now where there are plenty of people is where they WANT the refinery, problem is that isn't waste land.....well not if they don't build. The refineries in this area have taken entire cities, brought the blight and destroyed the landscape. For a refinery to be built in your backyard you have to write off the land it's built on and everything downwind and down stream for a couple miles. You can buy a house in Marcus Hook for about $20,000, the same thing 10 miles up the road is $250,000.........now why would someone want anything like that in their back yard?
It's not terribly hard to figure out.
Chuck
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On Wed, 07 Sep 2005 20:07:45 GMT, Chuck Rudy

That's the same Catch-22 that a lot of industries suffer from. Airports are a good example, too. Thing is - you put industry X somewhere, people will congregate around it for the jobs. Eventually, you get people moving there because it's become a Nice Place to Live.
However... when the industry that started the growth wants to expand, the residents protest against it. They forget that they owe the existence of their community to that industry.
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Perhaps we could build 5 new refineries on the land currently owned by 5 supreme court justices.
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6 years for a refinery permit is nothing. How long did it take the last nuke power plant to go from applying for a permit to online power generation? And how many have been built in the last 3 decades or so?
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I'm confident that if/when it is profitable and low risk, they will be built.

Yes, and we are. I think we should be conserving domestic oil and importing all the foreign oil we can get, ideally all of it, for vehicle fuel use. For "energy" I favor other means.

I'd prefer to exhaust foreign oil supplies first. Then too, I suspect that the US may eventually have to sell all or part of Alaska to pay its debts and other obligations, and mucking up ANWR could adversely effect the sale price.
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Alan Jones wrote:

Like nuke plants, one purpose for all the regulations and permit hassles is specifically to make it UNprofitable. You can thank the liberals/environuts for this. Same with all the lawsuits everytime someone tries to build something useful like a refinery or power plant -- they figure if they can't stop it outright, they can at least make it too expensive to build.

Good idea, at least on its face. On the other hand, we need at least some domestic oil to help keep the price of the foreign stuff down. Without it, they'd really have us over a barrel. Also, if we wait until the foreign sources dry up (physically or politically), it could take too long to get domestic oil into production.
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On 6 Sep 2005 22:42:03 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Not quite. If you can't properly build a profitable safe secure nuke plant, you should not build a profitable unsafe nuke plant.

I was referring to the increased use of modern wind mills. But now that we have a nuclear waste depository and sky high petroleum prices, I'd expect to see more interest in safe environmentally friendly nuke plants.

You sound like you want to have your cake and eat it too. The SPR and untapped US oil in the ground will tend to keep the price of foreign oil down, but not by much. What will keep the price low is increasing foreign production, and decreasing consumption by countries bidding against us for the same oil. This can be addressed in part by our foreign policy. For example, don't piss off oil producing nations or their leaders, and for God's sake keep war out of those regions. Try to keep other oil importing nations from becoming cash rich. E.g. maintain a balance of trade with China (or even unbalanced in our favor).

Not a problem. The problem is waiting (physically and politically) for foreign sources to dry up before US reserves dry up.
Alan
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Alan Jones wrote:

Who said anything about building unsafe nuke plants?? The lawsuits and excessive regulations are intended to make all nuclear power plants unaffordable, regardless of how safe they are.
t
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