A different method

While doing some trackwork on my Ntrak module, I had to remove and replace some track. The track pried up and left the ballast in place
nicely, and reinstallation was as simple as pressing the track back into the ballast and respiking.
One area, however, was a little more difficult. The tie strips had come undone from the rail, at a point critical for proper gauge. I found I was able to use any ties from my flex track to place these ties back in the ballast, and then attach the rails with some track spikes and super glue (CA). As a result, I've got my mainline fixed, and a newfound appreciation for my handlaying skills.
What struck me most in this whole process was how easily the track came up from the ballast, and how well it fit back in. After respiking, the track was as good as new.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course it depends a bit on how strong a mixture of glue you used to put the track down with. I'm afraid some of mine is nearly unremovable.
--
-Glennl
The despammed service works OK, but unfortunately
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

...and probably the type of glue as well. I'd guess that normal water based glue like Elmer's wouldn't stick well to the plastic and that it might be that your ballast was pretty much holding things together. I used some construction adhesive and I pull the rails off of the ties before the ties let go. One thing that I think about with any building project... how hard will it be to take apart if I ever need to?
dlm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yep, that's what I used. The track is held in place by spikes, the ballast with glue. It makes things more easily repairable.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I guy my track down with a 50/50 white glue and water mixture. When I had to remove some to change turnouts, I just sprayed it with water, waited a while, and lifted it off. My question is..........when you say you spiked it down, do you really mean the L shaped rail spikes, or just the straight little brads through the center holes in the ties? I have never been able to find a commercial spike for hand laying HO rail that looks anything close to scale, let alone N scale spikes. I was thinking of cutting / grinding office staples to see if I could come up with something the right size.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've been using the N scale rail spikes, the black ones. Usually with standard track I just put them in the middle holes and be done, but I've used them in hand laying and repair too. To me, they're not significantly bigger than the "spike" on the tie strips anyway.
I can see though, where you'd see them as too big. Prototype spike heads are only an inch and a half or so by two inches and the commercial ones are much larger.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.