Aerial photos - better than Google Earth / maps

This may not be news to most of you, but I have just discovered
Micro$oft's answer to Google Earth, and it scores a few points over its
rival.
Firstly, the maps (like Google Maps) and 3D (like Google Earth) are
integrated so you can switch between the two.
Secondly, and more importantly, you can switch to viewing the
un-manipulated source images. Because these have not been twisted to
remove the natural perspective of the shot, the whole resolution is
available, providing far more detail. The upshot is that there's enough
detail to make out railway features such as signals, gantries and even
individual sleepers.
Here's an example :
a quiet Preston station, where a Pendolino is just visible poking out
from under the canopy, and a 57/3 in the north bay (can't quite make out
the number ;-) )
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that's a long link, so it will no doubt get wrapped, but I'm sure you
can fix that.
The down side to all this is that you need to install it on your PC
(like Google Earth), but it's worth it IMHO.
Adrian
Reply to
Adrian
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???? i'm pretty sure I've neve rinstalled anything to use local.live.com. There are certainly areas of the country which are covered by much higher resolution photos on there than Google Earth, much of Hants & Dorset for example.
Reply to
airsmoothed
However there is not any universal level of coverage on any of these systems across the entire British Isles therefore it is potluck as to whether you get good definition or a blurry mess like Rolf Hariss's paintings....
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Reply to
Bob
"Bob" wrote in news:WJaji.129033$ snipped-for-privacy@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk:
Google ... clear picture that allows me to identify the car on my drive, and on one memorable instance see myself in my own back garden (just).
M$ ... I can make out a grey ribbon that is probably the road outside my house.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
In message , Chris Wilson writes
Google - I can see all of my garden railway
M$ - I can only see phases 1 & 2 of my garden railway, the photo is so old that phase 3 is not included.
Some joins are atrocious, see Proctor yard near Duluth USA (sorry, can't give you grid reference (latitude & longitude) as M$ doesn't give them, whereas Google does.
Reply to
Jane Sullivan
Jane Sullivan wrote in news:cutL8ViUUWjGFAq$@yddraiggoch.demon.co.uk:
...
That's a point, google appears to update every few months, M$ image is at least 18 months old+ (as noted via cars on drive and outside house)
As an aside it's not until you look that you (a) appreciate how many folks in SE London have swimming pools and (b) just how many homes look near identical in a lovely part of the world just outside of Bromley. :-)
Reply to
Chris Wilson
Chris Wilson wrote in news:Xns9964EDD919702ulmbritwarcouk@62.253.170.163:
...
(I used PSP to magnify the image!)
Reply to
Chris Wilson
Not everywhere. It's still showing a row of historic buildings near me which were flattened by the council three years ago. I'm only sorry Google Earth didn't exist 40 years ago.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
)
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You just got lucky. Where I live the M$ image is just as out of date and blurry as the Google one.
MBQ
Reply to
manatbandq
Looking at east Leeds, Neville Hill Depot has Stored class 141`s are there ( long gone now ), And Midland Road Depot isnt there yet ! Kindest regards Simon Judd
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Reply to
Simon Judd
It's like the fad for "wonder foods" and tabloid statistics. People will believe something is the best thing since sliced bread, based on the flimsiest of evidence, with no attempt to verify the facts for themselves.
MBQ
Reply to
manatbandq
It looks like it's pot luck which system is best in your area. In Preston, the resolution is good on both systems, but the ability to see the raw, undistorted images makes all the difference on the M$ system. Also, a very recent update to the Google aerials results in a change of image set right across the middle of Preston station, and the two don't even allign properly.
For Lancashire, there is the Mario Maps which include 1940s aerials, which are very interesting.
Adrian
Reply to
Adrian
Bolton doesn't appear to be in Lancashire anymore? I'm sure it was last time I was there. It must have moved.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
Both systems tend to be better in urban areas, and the coverage is good for both in Preston except Google now has a change of image-set right across the middle of the station, which is quite nasty.
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Adrian
Reply to
Adrian
Excuse me! There's no need to be pompous about it. I never said it was "the best thing since sliced bread" or anything vaguely close to that.
I just pointed out that M$ has clearer, higher resolution images available than Google. I believe that the area I am looking at is covered by both M$ and Google at their highest quality, so my comments are at least as valid as anyone elses.
For your information, I am not a tabloid reader, and treat claims about "superfoods" with healthy scepticism.
Adrian
Reply to
Adrian
Kim
I come from Bolton (in fact I'm there now!) and I can confirm that Bolton is NOT in Lancashire, in the same way that Old Trafford (home of the Lancashire cricket team) is NOT in Lancashre. We have been part of Greater Manchester for many years now, although as far as the Post Office is concerned, the change never happened.
The boundary is between Horwich and Adlington (Chorley).
Adrian
Reply to
Adrian
Greater Manchester is a metropolitan county in North West England which has a population of 2.55 million.[1] Greater Manchester came into existence as a metropolitan county in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972. The county consists of ten metropolitan boroughs, including the City of Manchester and the City of Salford.
Greater Manchester County Council was abolished in 1986, and so its districts (the metropolitan boroughs) are now effectively unitary authorities. However, the metropolitan county, which is some 496 square miles (1276 km²),[2] continues to exist in law and as an administrative frame of reference.
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Reply to
MartinS
In message , Adrian writes
Post Office, or Royal Mail?
The Royal Mail postcode checker shows a Bolton address, quite correctly, without any mention of Lancs or Manchester. The Bolton News (local newspaper) still shows an address in Bolton, Lancashire.
Reply to
Graeme
Some individuals and businesses stubbornly cling to postal addresses as they were before reorganisation in 1974, and even refuse to use Postcodes. Some new counties (e.g. Humberside) later got changed back. I believe that Royal Mail no longer requires the county, as long as there is a valid Postcode.
Reply to
MartinS
PS Bolton was still in Lancashire c 1966 when someone counted 4,000 potholes in the roads.
Reply to
MartinS

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